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Rhodia Coating On A Colour Laser Paper


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I'm not getting very far in my quest to find the ideal plain laser paper suitable for use with a fountain pen!

 

I know that rhodia is a coated paper, and that this coating is what gives it, its great properties when used with aqueous ink used in fountain pens. It never feather or bleeds through, even with my wettest nibs like the Visconti Homo sapiens stub.

I realised that most colour laser papers are also coated but most seem to pale into insignificance when compared to rhodia paper. I've tried HP colour laser, staples laser, conqueror super smooth and conquerer bamboo, and mondi colour laser. Although all of these are coated as well, they all seem to feather mor than I would like.

 

After hearing so many great things about HP colour laser, I bought a ream and was quite underwhelmed and disappointed with how badly it feathers and bled through. I've ordered some Clairfontaine DCP, but anticipate it to have similar problems.

 

Any ides of what laser paper, available in bulk have a similar coating to that found on rhodia? Any idea of what rhodia is coated with?

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  • Moshe ben David

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What weight was your HP colour laser paper? I tried the 32 lb and 24 lb at a store and the 32 lb paper noticeably took ink better. No bleedthrough or feathering with my wettest nib, a Sailor Crosspoint which goes to BBB. And I kept colouring the same spot over and over again!

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Rhodia isn't as much coated as it's seized just right. Coating is more of what you'd find on shiny postcards and magazines. You really can't pick off what is in rhodia, as it's made with it through and through, unlike magazines that can have the shiny layer stripped off. And if you're looking for what seizing they used, good luck. Even if you found it, and could apply it to paper in any decent amounts, I doubt you would let a laser printer eat it.

 

HOWEVER... I have found a paper by Georgia Pacific that doesn't feather/bleed through, and I have found some of their paper to bleed like mad. So, just got to go out and try a ton. I had to go through 5 brands to find one I could use.

Edited by Inkling13
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The only HP colour laser paper available here is 100gms/m2

100 gsm is between 24 and 28 pound bond weight. 32 pound paper is more like 120 gsm.

 

The sizing is what helps to make the paper less likely to absorb water. Calendaring the paper is another important factor. Calendaring is a burnishing process that further smooths and hardens the surface. Different papers are calendared to different extents. The most extreme calendaring leaves either a hard glossy surface or a linen texture. Linen finished and laid finished papers often have good ink properties largely due to the calendaring and sizing.

 

Fiber content makes a huge difference as well. Higher cotton content makes better paper. Some of the nicest letter stationery was traditionally 100% cotton. Such paper is lighter than all wood paper of the same thickness. It is more durable, and resists aging better. It is called ragg because the cotton used is waste fiber.

 

My ideal writing paper would be high ragg content paper with a laid finish. There used to be some ragg printing paper available that was used for letterheads. Most of what I see now leans toward fake parchment, though there is some plain paper available still.

 

I also rather enjoy using a good onion skin, though those have also become rare.

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Rhodia isn't as much coated as it's seized just right. Coating is more of what you'd find on shiny postcards and magazines. You really can't pick off what is in rhodia, as it's made with it through and through, unlike magazines that can have the shiny layer stripped off. And if you're looking for what seizing they used, good luck. Even if you found it, and could apply it to paper in any decent amounts, I doubt you would let a laser printer eat it.

 

HOWEVER... I have found a paper by Georgia Pacific that doesn't feather/bleed through, and I have found some of their paper to bleed like mad. So, just got to go out and try a ton. I had to go through 5 brands to find one I could use.

 

umm. Do you have specs describing which Georgia Pacific product?

Moshe ben David

 

"Behold, He who watches over Israel neither slumbers nor sleeps!"

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umm. Do you have specs describing which Georgia Pacific product?

That's the thing, I think it's generic, since I have purchased differently packaged, but same spec GP paper, and had different results. You just need to try them.

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That's the thing, I think it's generic, since I have purchased differently packaged, but same spec GP paper, and had different results. You just need to try them.

 

Usually the wrapper on the ream gives at least some info!?

Moshe ben David

 

"Behold, He who watches over Israel neither slumbers nor sleeps!"

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I've found Character 100gsm wove to be an excellent paper with a smooth finish, reasonably ink resistant and with no bleed-through with a fountain pen (I can just get it to show though with a very wet dip pen). I've only used the cream colour with fountain pens but the white should have the same properties. It's suitable for laser printing but is a bit expensive as it's a premium paper meant for letterheads.

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Thanks for all the info friends! I've just ordered some HP colour laser 120gms from Amazon. I'll keep you posted on how it performs.

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I'm not getting very far in my quest to find the ideal plain laser paper suitable for use with a fountain pen!

 

I know that rhodia is a coated paper, and that this coating is what gives it, its great properties when used with aqueous ink used in fountain pens. It never feather or bleeds through, even with my wettest nibs like the Visconti Homo sapiens stub.

I realised that most colour laser papers are also coated but most seem to pale into insignificance when compared to rhodia paper. I've tried HP colour laser, staples laser, conqueror super smooth and conquerer bamboo, and mondi colour laser. Although all of these are coated as well, they all seem to feather mor than I would like.

 

After hearing so many great things about HP colour laser, I bought a ream and was quite underwhelmed and disappointed with how badly it feathers and bled through. I've ordered some Clairfontaine DCP, but anticipate it to have similar problems.

 

Any ides of what laser paper, available in bulk have a similar coating to that found on rhodia? Any idea of what rhodia is coated with?

 

See if this review I did some years ago helps

fpn_1412827311__pg_d_104def64.gif




“Them as can do has to do for them as can’t.


And someone has to speak up for them as has no voices.”


Granny Aching

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  • 2 weeks later...

Some people have reported success with HP 24lb inkjet paper (not laser paper). I've never tried it personally, but I do have a ream of 32lb laser paper.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I actually asked Goulet pens what their printer paper was, they always write these cute little notes on my orders with fountain pens. They use 24lb HP laserjet paper (90g/m^2). It is not too fancy, but is certainly adequate, and much cheaper than my Rhodia, Clairfontaine, and Trimophe habit. It seems to take ink well and I wanted something I could print an essay or what ever on then correct with my fountain pen. It was $12.00 a ream. My work desk is currently covered in it so I can test pens as I fix them. I kept doing inane doodles on my expensive paper and needed to curtail my spending somehow. I use Diamine inks and love to fix vintage flex pens and it doesn't seem to feather for me.

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I use the 32 pound HP Premium Laser paper and find that it loves fountain pens. :)

How is shading on this type of paper, also is it the same type of paper in this link:

 

http://www.staples.com/HP-Premium-Choice-Laser-Paper-8-1-2-inch-x-11-inch/product_397160

 

Can you write on both sides? Do you think it'd be ok for letter writing to family ie not professionally? How does it compare to Clairfontaine?

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How is shading on this type of paper, also is it the same type of paper in this link:

 

http://www.staples.com/HP-Premium-Choice-Laser-Paper-8-1-2-inch-x-11-inch/product_397160

 

Can you write on both sides? Do you think it'd be ok for letter writing to family ie not professionally? How does it compare to Clairfontaine?

Yes, that's the right paper. You can definitely write on both sides--I've never seen any ink have any show through on that paper. It has great shading, as good as Clairfontaine or Rhodia. It's thicker than Clairfontaine, but the surface properties are fairly similar, at least in my experience. As an added benefit, it has a very good per sheet cost. I think I got a ream of this stuff shipped for $15 on Amazon once. The only downside is that if you had a large stack, it would be noticeably thicker than other papers. Personally I find that the thickness is a nice touch that helps distinguish your letters from the standard typed 20lb copy paper fare that is common these days.

Edited by chitinid
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How is shading on this type of paper, also is it the same type of paper in this link:

 

http://www.staples.com/HP-Premium-Choice-Laser-Paper-8-1-2-inch-x-11-inch/product_397160

 

Can you write on both sides? Do you think it'd be ok for letter writing to family ie not professionally? How does it compare to Clairfontaine?

That's the stuff!

 

 

fpn_1392086008__2014-02-09_201236a.jpg

 

lots of flexing and no bleed through.

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For those here in the UK, the very best laser paper is Staples 120gsm colour laser paper. I've tried clairfontaine DCP 100gsm and 120gsm, HP colour laser again in both 100 and 120gsm variants, and staples colour laser 100gsm.

The cheaper staples colour laser doesn't feather, and shows remarkable levels of shading as compared to the more expensive clairfontaine and HP offerings.

Splashing out a bit more, both the conqueror bamboo and super smooth also performed very well, though the bamboo might be a little too toothy for some.

 

I tried with several inks, including Diamine and Noodler's waterproof lines on all papers.

Edited by Sach
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For those here in the UK, the very best laser paper is Staples 120gsm colour laser paper.......

 

Sach

 

You've found a good 'un there. I've just popped into Staples with a few fountain pens and they gave me some sample sheets to try. It is brilliant to write on; feels like a quality paper, is smooth, bright white, absolutely no problems with feathering, bleed-through or show-through. Is reminiscent of Optik I think. Ink colours pop. It takes double-sided writing without the slightest problem. It is slightly too heavy at 120gsm for airmail letters, but it is perfect for local letters, daily writing, inserting into loose-leaf binders and systems, or for making into homemade journals. And at £6.49 for 250 A4 sheets I think it's a bargain.

 

It is such a contrast to my all time favourite Tomoe River, in terms of weight, handling and colour, but I think I could grow to like it just as much.

 

Thank you Sach for the tip.

 

ps

for those in UK, all Red n Black notebooks are 1/2 price in Staples at the moment, including the new business and 'Black' range. Same deal on Nu Elite, including a twin pack of 2 x A5 journals - I wiro (lined) + 1 casebound (plain), both with 120gsm, FP-friendly paper.

Verba volant, scripta manent

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