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Hello everyone,

 

I'm setting my sights on some larger pens. I think too much computer gaming at a young age made my hand a little sensitive, so I'm looking for something that manufacturers seem to reserve for their more expensive models - a girthier section. So I'm looking at (I have some credit on JM's site, so I'm choosing from their stock):

 

an Omas 360

 

a Sailor KOP

 

a Pelikan M1000

 

a Danitrio Takumi or Hakkaku

 

(and a Nakaya dorsal fin, maybe?)

 

and the recently released Bexley's OC 2014, which I can't yet buy

 

I had a chance to handle a 360, and I mean that, strictly: it was uninked. I found it very comfortable to hold.

 

The Sailor and the Pelikan have the appeal of those unique, enormous nibs. I generally prefer lighter pens, and the Pelikan is on the heavier side of these pen selections, but excellent balance, if it's there, can make weight less of a factor. The Pilot Custom 823 and Nakaya Desk Pen feel just fine, despite weighing 20+ grams uncapped.

 

Danitrio is relatively unfamiliar, but I like the shape of these two pens. I put a maybe on the Dorsal Fin because looking at the pictures it feels like the nib is just a little too small for the pen's proportions. Pictures dramatize everything, though.

 

So I'm just looking for thoughts on these pens. My goal is to obtain a pen that's highly comfortable and has the kind of nib qualities you might (ideally) expect from one of a manufacturer's premium pens. I like butter.

 

Thank you for reading :)

Edited by lightless

lightless

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Of these you've listed, I only have the Danitrio Takumi Hakkaku (octagon). The Takumi is my preferred size for my larger pens, very comfortable for me to hold. The Hakkaku is also good.

 

However, without actually being able to hold and write with your choices, it could be a difficult decision for you.

 

Because I really love my Danitrio pens (I've a few), of course I'd go for another in a heartbeat. I have a Nakaya Neo Standard, but I don't like it as much as my Danitrio pens, either. I'd recommend a trip to the Japanese regional forum for some more insights on these pens, maybe.

 

I had smaller Pelikans, and we just eventually parted ways, so I would not be one to choose Pelikan for myself. It wouldn't stop me from recommending a Pelikan to others.

 

I don't know about the Sailor or new 2014 Bexley.

 

If you really liked the Omas, and you already know how it feels, then perhaps that is the way to go.

 

I'm not going into nibs here, because whichever pen you decide on will have an excellent nib once "JM" is done fine tuning it just for you.

Scribere est agere.

To write is to act.

___________________________

Danitrio Fellowship

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Of the pens you have listed of which I have two, the Sailor and Pelikan, I like the Sailor better. If you want to take a little walk on the wild side with a large bold buttery smooth well balanced pen you should consider a Lamy Dialog 3. This pen is a BIG cap less pen with a twist mechanism that slides the nib smoothly out of the interior of the barrel while retracting the clip onto the shell. When the pen is twisted closed a ball valve shield moves in front of the opening to prevent the retracted nib from drying out. The clip lifts up and the fountain pen can be clipped into a pocket or bag. I like this pen over the Sailor and Pelikan.

Avatar painting by William-Adolphe Bouguereau (1825 - 1905) titled La leçon difficile (The difficult lesson)

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Of the pens you have listed of which I have two, the Sailor and Pelikan, I like the Sailor better. If you want to take a little walk on the wild side with a large bold buttery smooth well balanced pen you should consider a Lamy Dialog 3. This pen is a BIG cap less pen with a twist mechanism that slides the nib smoothly out of the interior of the barrel while retracting the clip onto the shell. When the pen is twisted closed a ball valve shield moves in front of the opening to prevent the retracted nib from drying out. The clip lifts up and the fountain pen can be clipped into a pocket or bag. I like this pen over the Sailor and Pelikan.

While the nib on the Lamy Dialog is very good, as are all thos gold nibs, I would advise against the Dialog as it is a very heavy pen and the balance is peculiar. It is front heavy.

I like that myself but lightless appreciates lighter pens.

 

D.ick

~

KEEP SAFE, WEAR A MASK, KEEP A DISTANCE.

Freedom exists by virtue of self limitation.

~

 

 

 

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Of the ones you listed I only have a OMAS 360 ... great pen/writer & stunning looks. It's one pen that certainly will get you a lot of attention/questions :D

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I have the Pelikan's younger brother -- an m800. And a bunch of Parker Duofold Centennials. The m800 is my preferred amongst these. I write with the cap not posted. Nib is in fact (for me) buttery smooth. By extension then I'd be inclined towards the m1000; you need to try it with some ink as this is such a personal choice!

Moshe ben David

 

"Behold, He who watches over Israel neither slumbers nor sleeps!"

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