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Vintage Montblanc Choices For A Novice Collector - Help!


DevonEncinias
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Morning all!

 

I'm a novice fountain pen 'collector', have been writing with fountain pens for about a year and a half. I'm looking into getting a vintage pen. I've recently purchased a beautiful vintage Waterman's fine flex in robin's egg blue, which is beautiful. I'm now looking at a few choices in Montblanc. I'm looking for a really good flex pen in Montblanc, but I'm not familiar with Montblanc's number system. If anyone could help, I'd greatly appreciate it! Here are my choices:

 

Montblanc Meisterstuck 114 Mozart w/ M 14k gold nib, 585 engraved, very good condition - $259

 

Mid 1950s Montblanc 344 w/ EF full flex, solid 14c gold nib, 585 engraved, very good condition - $290

 

1939 Montblanc 332 w/ Oblique Medium #2 flex nib, near-mint condition - $265

 

Thank you!

 

- Devon

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  • jar

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Hi, welcome home. Pull up a stump and set a spell.

 

The 144 will have absolutely no flex.

 

The numbering systems changed slightly over the periods involved for those three pens but the first number remained constant; 1 was the Luxury line, 2 the Mid range and 3 the Economy, Student pens. The second digit in the latter two pens signified the filling system, in this case both 3 & 4 would signify a piston fill as they changed the numbering system between the flat top models of the 30s and the cigar shape models of the 50s. The final digit indicates relative nib size and size of pen. a "4" will be slightly fatter, longer and have a larger nib than a "2".

 

Now general rules. Don't believe everything said about "flex" in pen ads. Know the seller and how much that person knows about what flex really is.

 

Second, ask lots of questions about the condition of the pen, if it is warped, if the seals have been tested or replaced, about micro cracks, cap lips, inner caps condition, inkview window, original stampings one the piston knob or blind cap ...

 

Finally, there are lots of experienced fountain pen folk in Georgia. If possible get them to take a look.

 

My Website

 

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I second Jar's excellent advice. Take your time and know what you are buying.

" Gladly would he learn and gladly teach" G. Chaucer

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Okay, that makes sense. Thank you very much! I'll be scrupulous. Where can I find literature of the number systems and such on Montblanc? I'm interesting in knowing more about them! Is 'flex' dictated from nib to nib or model to model, generally?

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Okay, that makes sense. Thank you very much! I'll be scrupulous. Where can I find literature of the number systems and such on Montblanc? I'm interesting in knowing more about them! Is 'flex' dictated from nib to nib or model to model, generally?

 

 

Start here for general information.

 

Flex will vary from nib to nib. It will be more common in the 3xx level pens as they were sold to students who might actually use flex and was offered as an option across all the 3xx level pens. In general you are also more likely to find nibs made before the 60s more flexible than those made later but old does not necessarily mean flexy.

 

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I really doubt that there is any 34x full flex nib.

The 34x pens are good semi flex nibs.

 

From my perspective there is not much difference regarding to flex across the 50s 1xx, 2xx and 3xx pens, all semi flex (with slight differences).

Edited by Pterodactylus
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http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/xq90/842/h4g2.jpg

 

(Waterman 12 1/2 BCHR ..... Sailor Jentle Sky High)

(Montblanc 342 - EF ..... Private Reserve Electric DC Blue)

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Have to agree with the excellent advice of the guys above.

 

As you probably already know, there are variations on the definition of 'flex' and, if it is simply flex and flex alone that you are after, then I think Pterodactylus' last comment is worth bearing in mind.

 

When attempting to impress with flex, I reach for one of my vintage Onoto pens or a Waterman. However, if I am going to indulge in a wholesome writing experience - selfishly treat myself - I have a few vintage Montblanc pens to pick from :thumbup:

 

Pavoni.

Edited by pavoni
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After some questioning, I went ahead and purchased the MB 344. I also have what I believe is a Waterman's 52 on the way. I'll post a few photos of each. Thank you very much for all the advice!

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file:///Users/DevonEncinias/Downloads/$_14.JPG


file:///Users/DevonEncinias/Downloads/$_14-4.JPG


file:///Users/DevonEncinias/Downloads/$_14-3.JPG

file:///Users/DevonEncinias/Downloads/$_14-2.JPG

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