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Parker 45 Warped Section (More Than Common)


Scycotic
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Hey,

 

So a while back I acquired two used Parker 45 pens, one with a 14k extra fine nib and the other with a steel Fine.

 

Unfortunately, the 14k nib seems to have been either worn out, or badly ground...it writes as thick as a Japanese M, and has such a tiny sweet spot that it's immensely difficult to use. A tiny bit off and the pen bites into the paper. I made sure the tines are aligned, and spread them a tiny bit to make it wetter which seems to have helped a bit, but it's still not very fun to use.

 

In addition, my other P45 kept getting ink all over the inside of the cap, as well as the section. I couldn't figure it out and packed away the pen for a while, and only took it out today. I had stored it cap off, but I now realize the whole section is warped, so the nib doesn't even point up anymore, it slants slightly.

 

At this point I'm considering just sticking the steel nib onto the section of the other pen (with a problematic nib), but it seems to be a bit of a waste...

 

Are there any easy ways to fix the 14k nib and/or the warped section? I'll try to post photos later.

 

Thanks!

 

edit:

 

Here are some photos!

 

http://i43.tinypic.com/295cs5u.jpg

 

http://i42.tinypic.com/rup8og.jpg

 

http://i41.tinypic.com/1y1t87.jpg

 

http://i43.tinypic.com/2guz91u.jpg

Edited by Scycotic
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I personally am 0-3 in XF P-45 Gold nibs. I haven't found a decent one yet. (Not that it's something I Look for.)

 

I also have the most issues with XF Estie nibs. I think over the years the XFs are more likely to be "pronged" even if that's just a micro-prong enough to knock them out of whack.

 

A good nib tech can reduce the width. If you really like the P-45 as I do, and have the 14k nib, to me it's worth the $25 to send it to Pendemonium for the reduction. Plus if you are specific enough with your request to them, you can have the flow, etc; set to your liking at the same time.

 

Some say spending that on a P-45 nib is crazy. I have probably 6 P-45 nibs that I paid Mike Masuyama around $30 each for their grinds. For around $50 I have a 14k custom nib in a sturdy, nice looking vintage pen. That works for me. (I figure it would cost $125 or so to duplicate this in a modern pen.)

 

IMO, it would be almost impossible to fix that hood.

 

The way that repair would be correctly done is to insert a mandrel into the hood and as the hood is heated, the mandrel going in forces the soften plastic back into straight. This is already a difficult job, the slope/taper of the hood pushes it IMO from really difficult all the way to nearly impossible to ever get straight. (I'm sure someone will correct me if I'm wrong.)

 

First you'd need to get the collector out from the converter end. They Can come out but I don't know if they were originally solvent welded in, adhesived in, or friction fitted.

 

Oh, and brand new hoods are around $10-15. (There are two kinds of P-45 hoods. Dimpled ones and one's that are going to Get dimpled. I tend to overlook that IMO one small genetic defect in the pen.)

 

Bruce in Ocala, Fl

Edited by OcalaFlGuy
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There is a large manufacturing variance in the old Parker nibs.

I have F nibs that range in measured tip width from that of a XF to a M.

So it does not surprise me that you have a wide XF nib, which would write similar to a F nib.

A Japanese M nib is similar to a Parker F nib.

And there you have it, your old Parker XF nib matches the Japanese M nib.

 

The old Parker nibs are not like the current nibs.

Unfortunately, that is just they way it is.

I wish my old Parker F nib was as smooth as my Pilot M nib, but it isn't close.

San Francisco Pen Show - August 28-30, 2020 - Redwood City, California

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On a 45 the nibs are not marked. The mark is on the feed. Net result is you can't always go by the markings as things get swapped.

San Francisco International Pen Show - The next great pen show is on schedule for August 27-28-29, 2021. If we all do what we need to do...you can Book your travel and tables and make SF 2021 the Return. 
 

 My PM box is usually full. Just email me: my last name at the google mail address.

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Thanks everyone for the replies.

 

 

I personally am 0-3 in XF P-45 Gold nibs. I haven't found a decent one yet. (Not that it's something I Look for.)

 

I also have the most issues with XF Estie nibs. I think over the years the XFs are more likely to be "pronged" even if that's just a micro-prong enough to knock them out of whack.

 

A good nib tech can reduce the width. If you really like the P-45 as I do, and have the 14k nib, to me it's worth the $25 to send it to Pendemonium for the reduction. Plus if you are specific enough with your request to them, you can have the flow, etc; set to your liking at the same time.

 

Some say spending that on a P-45 nib is crazy. I have probably 6 P-45 nibs that I paid Mike Masuyama around $30 each for their grinds. For around $50 I have a 14k custom nib in a sturdy, nice looking vintage pen. That works for me. (I figure it would cost $125 or so to duplicate this in a modern pen.)

 

IMO, it would be almost impossible to fix that hood.

 

The way that repair would be correctly done is to insert a mandrel into the hood and as the hood is heated, the mandrel going in forces the soften plastic back into straight. This is already a difficult job, the slope/taper of the hood pushes it IMO from really difficult all the way to nearly impossible to ever get straight. (I'm sure someone will correct me if I'm wrong.)

 

First you'd need to get the collector out from the converter end. They Can come out but I don't know if they were originally solvent welded in, adhesived in, or friction fitted.

 

Oh, and brand new hoods are around $10-15. (There are two kinds of P-45 hoods. Dimpled ones and one's that are going to Get dimpled. I tend to overlook that IMO one small genetic defect in the pen.)

 

Bruce in Ocala, Fl

 

Hm, yeah I'll consider getting the XF nib sent to a pro, for now I've combined the two pens to get a decent writer.

 

There is a large manufacturing variance in the old Parker nibs.

I have F nibs that range in measured tip width from that of a XF to a M.

So it does not surprise me that you have a wide XF nib, which would write similar to a F nib.

A Japanese M nib is similar to a Parker F nib.

And there you have it, your old Parker XF nib matches the Japanese M nib.

 

The old Parker nibs are not like the current nibs.

Unfortunately, that is just they way it is.

I wish my old Parker F nib was as smooth as my Pilot M nib, but it isn't close.

My Pilot nibs are definitely smoother, they're my EDC right now. I like the feel of the P45 in the hand though...

 

 

On a 45 the nibs are not marked. The mark is on the feed. Net result is you can't always go by the markings as things get swapped.

Hm, that's true. Although the tipping amount on the X nib is definitely less than on the F one.

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