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Noodler's Flex Pen For Everyday Writing?


Davis19942003
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This may be a stupid question. I am planning to get a noodler's nib creaper for the next pen because it's inexpensive, I also know that the nib creaper can flex alot. But can I use it on everyday writing( quick notes, etc.)? If yes, what is its nibs size? Can I write fine lines with this pen? Thank you.

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I do not think you would find it problematic; while the Noodler's flex nib, like the FPR flex nib, can flex significantly, it only does so if you make a conscious effort. For normal writing it would give only a hint of line variation that actually adds to your writing. That said, it would also be easy to swap out the flex nib for a non-flex one, I found the Serwex #4 nib sold by FPR is a perfect fit.

No, I am not going to list my pens here.

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This may be a stupid question. I am planning to get a noodler's nib creaper for the next pen because it's inexpensive, I also know that the nib creaper can flex alot. But can I use it on everyday writing( quick notes, etc.)? If yes, what is its nibs size? Can I write fine lines with this pen? Thank you.

 

Flex nib fountain pens are very nice for casual writing. Flex calligraphy nibs, not so much. The two Noodler's flex pens I have make excellent everyday writers, and the little bit of springiness I get without trying to flex adds enough line variation to be interesting without pretending to be Copperplate. :-)

Mike Hungerford

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Definitely. I have two Noodler's Ahab Flex pens, one inked with Noodler's Apache Sunset and one inked with Noodler's Black Swan in English Roses. I don't hesitate to use either one of them for general writing.

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I use Noodler's pens all the time for regular writing. They write with a line that is slightly wider than fine. They do use a little more ink than other pens. However, they're awesome. My favorite is the Noodler's Konrad.

Proud resident of the least visited state in the nation!

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I am going to go against the grain a little here. I've had at least a dozen different Noodler's pens, and maybe one or two were usable out-of-the-box as everyday writers. Their ink flow is irregular, they tend to dry out easily, and they sometimes leak unexpectedly. If you plan to carry the pen around all day, with the possibility of it getting dropped or knocked around, stay with a safer pen in the same price range, such as the Pilot Metropolitan, or even Pilot Varsity. That's what I would do.

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Please, visit my website at http://www.acousticpens.com/

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I do use my Noodler's Creeper as a regular pen, and enjoy the variation I get from it without paying too much attention to flexing, but they aren't really great for every-day writers, just functional. If you want a flex pen, great and go for it, but be prepared to put up with a little bit of fussing and needing to pay closer attention to how you're writing (my writing pressure is becoming more even now that I'm aware of it).

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From the discussions, it appears that Noodlers imports Indian pens -- inexpesdive -- with a few modifications to the filling system. They often seen designed to be taken apart amd modified.

 

If you just want a plain old fountain pen, dependable, easy writer, consider the classic pens at both ends of the Great transition (from FP to BP):

 

- Parker 45: first successful cartridge converter, first component-pen, meaning the owner can unscrew every part and swap in another. Don't like the nib? Swap a broader or finer nib. Produced from about 1960 - 2007, never Parker's high end pen, but a work-horse that outsold all teh replacements Parker designed.

 

Key: In the '50s, Parker and Sheaffer, the world-leader pen companies, battled each other to produced a filling system that would allow a FP to compete with a ballpoint. The ballpoint was simpler to refill, cleaner. FP's used liquid ink -- a spill-threat -- and the market objected to opening a bottle, dipping, working a leavewr, wiping down the pen afterward, and people joked about ink spills and leaks.

 

By 1960, the cartridge converter seemed to be the best FP filling system. A user tossed the old cartridge and popped in the new cartridge with minimal leak/spill.

 

We started with Sheaffer cartridge school pens; moved to the P45 in junior high.

 

Lamy Safarai has the same system.

 

New Safari is about 30 USD; P45 on E$bay ranges from $10 - $20

Edited by welch

Washington Nationals 2019: the fight for .500; "stay in the fight"; WON the fight

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I have a Konrad and use it regularly for "regular" writing sessions.

Brad

"Words are, of course, the most powerful drug used by mankind" - Rudyard Kipling
"None of us can have as many virtues as the fountain-pen, or half its cussedness; but we can try." - Mark Twain

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I have used a "Nib Creaper" and its no longer sold non flex nib cousin as daily writers after getting both pens adjusted I found both tough enough for daily use with no problems as long as you don't treat them like "Bic Sticks". My only possible complaint could be ink capacity but only if I did not fill them daily. I have also used a Ahab, Ebonite Konrad, and Ebonite Areometric for daily writers. My favorite Noodler's pen for daily use is the Ebonite Aerometric followed by the Ebonite Konrad. While I like the Ahab especially for flex writing it does seem to do as well with the bumping around of day to day carry use but works great as a desk pen. One thing I have discovered about Noodler's pens in general is that the more you use them the better they write. My personal feeling is that machining opens up the pores of the ebonite used in the feeds of Noodler's pens and over time ink seals the pores of the ebonite. Additionally I have found that it is best only to clean feed when you have to and uses the gentlest method possible and avoid using an ultrasonic cleaner. I have one Ebonite Aerometric that I only use Noodler's Black ink in and other than an flushing the pen with cool water every week or two I done nothing with the in over two years except for write with it, no muss, no fuss and it writes perfectly.

They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety

Benjamin Franklin

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I have used a "Nib Creaper" and its no longer sold non flex nib cousin as daily writers after getting both pens adjusted I found both tough enough for daily use with no problems as long as you don't treat them like "Bic Sticks". My only possible complaint could be ink capacity but only if I did not fill them daily. I have also used a Ahab, Ebonite Konrad, and Ebonite Areometric for daily writers. My favorite Noodler's pen for daily use is the Ebonite Aerometric followed by the Ebonite Konrad. While I like the Ahab especially for flex writing it does seem to do as well with the bumping around of day to day carry use but works great as a desk pen. One thing I have discovered about Noodler's pens in general is that the more you use them the better they write. My personal feeling is that machining opens up the pores of the ebonite used in the feeds of Noodler's pens and over time ink seals the pores of the ebonite. Additionally I have found that it is best only to clean feed when you have to and uses the gentlest method possible and avoid using an ultrasonic cleaner. I have one Ebonite Aerometric that I only use Noodler's Black ink in and other than an flushing the pen with cool water every week or two I done nothing with the in over two years except for write with it, no muss, no fuss and it writes perfectly.

 

Oh yes, I 've heard that it's better to wash the pen before using it. Why do I have to do so?

Edited by Davis19942003
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Oh yes, I 've heard that it's better to wash the pen before using it. Why do I have to do so?

Inexpensive pens (and some more expensive ones, unfortunately) are not fully cleaned before leaving the factory to remove any residual oils or residue from manufacturing, and this can severely hamper proper performance.

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Inexpensive pens (and some more expensive ones, unfortunately) are not fully cleaned before leaving the factory to remove any residual oils or residue from manufacturing, and this can severely hamper proper performance.

I can't wait to receive my nib creaper now. Is it good to wash the pen with a bit if soap? Will it damage the pen?

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No, not for me because its nib writes Medium-Broad, too thick for me, I'll be ordering Goulet nibs soon, on the other hand it's very reliable writer with constant flow, best filling system I know of..

One boring blue, one boring black 1mm thickness at most....

Then there are Fountain Pens with gorgeous permanent inks..

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No, not for me because its nib writes Medium-Broad, too thick for me, I'll be ordering Goulet nibs soon, on the other hand it's very reliable writer with constant flow, best filling system I know of..

Does the goulet nibs fit the nib creaper? As I remember, the #6 nibs fit on Konrad and Ahab, I am not sure about the nib creaper.

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