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What Current Pen Has A Nib Like An Osmiroid?



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I would like to purchase a new fountain pen, not a dip pen, that has a nib like an Osmiroid nib from the 1960's that I used to use in Portland, Oregon. After much reading and reasearch, I bought a Scheaffer Viewpoint but the nib is much different. It does not give the same variation from thick to thin line that the Osmiroid tip did. I would appreciate it if anyone with specific knowledge of this matter could help.

Thank you

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I love Osmoroid nibs but haven't found any modern production pen/nib that is comparable. But why go for something new? The screw-in Osmoroid nibs fit in Esterbrook Js and both are readily available, and Esterbrook pens are of far better quality than Osmoroid pens which is what I discovered in Portland, OR in the 1970s. Something for you to think about...

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Hi,

 

Osmiroid made a lot of different kinds of nibs. Did your nib vary line-width based on pressure? Or was it the kind that made narrow strokes in one direction and broad strokes in another?

 

For the first type, you will need to find a pen with a flexible nib. For the second, a regular italic nib will do.

 

Dillon

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Dillon

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Look in English Ebay. I got a 6 nib set, EF, F-EF, M-F, M, B and BB in a set inexpensively.

Put them in your Estie.

As Dillo said, they made a lot of nibs. I have them listed in a small calligraphy book from them.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

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Thanks to everyone for your responses and advice.

Vintage -- the reason I am looking for something new is that my Osmiroid seems to have have flow problems. Runs too dry and I thought a new pen would be the solution. Maybe not.

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If you have flow problems, you've come to the right place!

There is lots of advice here but in essence, if your pen used to work it probably only needs a thorough flush through with clean water to remove any accumulated 'stuff' - little bits of ink that over the years can clog the flow a bit.

If ordinary water is not enough, add a little bit of detergent - the stuff for hand-washing dishes - followed by a thorough rinse. If there are still problems, add a bit of ammonia (though I've never tried this!), then a thorough rinse.

 

Another option is to try a 'wetter' ink. Tell us what ink you currently use and sit back and be amazed at the options ofr 'wetter' and/or 'drier' inks. Of course, they are all wet, but some flow better than others from individual pens.

 

Each one has its own personality!

 

And welcome :W2FPN:

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Antique -- thanks for the welcome and the flow advice. I have rinsed the nibs in water thoughly, and can try some detergent if you think it will work. I was hesitant on the ammonia, not wanting to ruin the nibs in an effort to improve them, and not knowing if ammonia can be used on all nibs.

 

Currently I am using Manuscript ink.

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Hi, Flipper.

 

Here are your options, in my view:

1. Try to get your Osmiroid serviced. It may need a new bladder at 50 years old, for example.

2. Get a "new" Osmiroid or an Esterbrook J and a set of Osmiroid nibs off of ebay.

3. Get another (more expensive but better quality) pen and have nib(s) custom ground to a crisp cursive italic.

 

Personally, I use Pelikan M6xx and M8xx, Conway Stewart and OMAS pens with custom-ground nibs mostly. When I want display-size script, I use Osmiroid B2, 3, or 4 nibs in Osmiroid or Esterbrook pens. You can have any one of several excellent "nibmeisters" grind a nib to your specifications. I have never found another nib that feels exactly like an Osmiroid, but many of mine have better thick/thin line differentiation.

 

BTW, what is your Portland connection? My first Osmiroid was acquired when I was a freshman at Reed College in 1961.

 

Happy writing!

 

David

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I used to use and Osmiroid as a kid in school (we had to). I remember it as being a scratchy little devil. As far as italic nibs are concerned I much favor the Parson's Itaix Italic nib or the Lamy Joy which is very sweet. Both of those are smooth and fun to write with. Maybe you could try them out thanks to someone you know who has one, or try one out at a pen shop.


 It's for Yew!bastardchildlil.jpg

 

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  • 1 year later...

Sorry for dredging this topic up

 

I've just got a Osmiroid 75, and it's Fine Italic nib is a revelation. Gives great thick/thin definition, whilst still being smooth enough for everyday writing

 

The body of the pen is a bit tatty, so I'll look to polish it up whilst also looking out for any nicer 75's and Esterbrook Js

 

As per the original topic question - is there a modern equivalent ? Previously used Lamy and Kaweco 1.1s, but they're thicker than the Fine Italic and don't give as much line variation. Italix offer a Fine Italic, but by their own admission it's more stub like.

Manuscript and Schaeffer offer pens with fine italic nibs, but they pen bodies don't seem to be as good as the Osmiroid 75 or Esterbrook J.

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If you want to try a "cheap" pen with a 1.1 italic nib to see how it goes for you, I would recommend the Manuscript Master, which is quite a step up from their calligraphy sets, and isn't made of the thin easily broken plastic.

It may not be a gorgeous looker, but it is solidly built (which isn't the case with their cheaper pens)

is very comfortable to use, and produces excellent variation.

The online stores sell them for around £22 but they are readily available new on ebay for between £7-£12. I paid £7 for mine and at that price.....a bargain.

 

In saying that, I'm currently on the lookout for one of the old Osmiroid 6 nib sets as well, as I narrowly missed one on ebay recently, but I don't want it to use the nibs in an Esterbrook, I want to use them in the pen they come with, and the nib variety is something that interests me.

I have a cheap calligraphy set which I really enjoy using and would like to make a step up in quality with regards to the nibs.

 

This is the Manuscript Master.

post-117767-0-21575100-1421763428_thumb.jpg

 

Regards

Ian

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If you want to try a "cheap" pen with a 1.1 italic nib to see how it goes for you, I would recommend the Manuscript Master, which is quite a step up from their calligraphy sets, and isn't made of the thin easily broken plastic.

It may not be a gorgeous looker, but it is solidly built (which isn't the case with their cheaper pens)

is very comfortable to use, and produces excellent variation.

The online stores sell them for around £22 but they are readily available new on ebay for between £7-£12. I paid £7 for mine and at that price.....a bargain.

 

In saying that, I'm currently on the lookout for one of the old Osmiroid 6 nib sets as well, as I narrowly missed one on ebay recently, but I don't want it to use the nibs in an Esterbrook, I want to use them in the pen they come with, and the nib variety is something that interests me.

I have a cheap calligraphy set which I really enjoy using and would like to make a step up in quality with regards to the nibs.

 

This is the Manuscript Master.

attachicon.gifmanuscript.jpg

 

Regards

Ian

 

Hmmm ... Does the Manuscript Master accept the italic nibs from the Manuscript sets with the more fragile pen?

 

David

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I'm not sure David, but I'll check in the morning, I don't want to wake the missus.

The front nib sections on the cheaper pens are made of plastic as is the pen body, but they may just screw onto the body of the master, which would be a bonus.

I believe the problem with the cheapies is that the plastic body tends to split, but the nibs are pretty good.

The master is a metal? Body, with a soft-grip rubbery covering and metal threads on the nib section and body.

If they do fit, buying the master and a 4/6 nib set would be a cost effective way of getting a decent pen and a load of different nibs to use with it.

 

Ian

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I'm not sure David, but I'll check in the morning, I don't want to wake the missus.

The front nib sections on the cheaper pens are made of plastic as is the pen body, but they may just screw onto the body of the master, which would be a bonus.

I believe the problem with the cheapies is that the plastic body tends to split, but the nibs are pretty good.

The master is a metal? Body, with a soft-grip rubbery covering and metal threads on the nib section and body.

If they do fit, buying the master and a 4/6 nib set would be a cost effective way of getting a decent pen and a load of different nibs to use with it.

 

Ian

 

Thanks, Ian. I can tell you are man of discretion and sound judgement. :P

 

I bought a 5 nib set but decided it was a great writer but too fragile. If I could use those nibs in a sturdier pen, that would be super.

 

Waiting for the word .....

 

David

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Bummer David

They don't fit. The thread section in the master body is too wide. :(

As we are more or less looking for a robust "handle" that can take the nibs, I tried the nibs in all of my other pens but the screw section on the nib units is too long to fit any of them. I think that the screw section in the nibs is made longer to try and make a sturdier join/fit as they are made of plastic.

They will screw a part of the way in but when at it's tightest there is still a fair bit of screw section showing.

I think I'm going to go the Osmiroid route as I can pick up a 65, 75, or a 6 nib calligraphy set fairly cheaply and there are loads of nibs of all sizes available from £5 which fit all Osmiroid pens.

The pens themselves are said to be pretty robust and reliable, with quite a few from the 60s still kicking about in good condition.

 

Ian

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If you do want a sturdier pen for the Manuscript Nibs, there's the Italix Originalis

 

http://www.mrpen.co.uk/contents/en-uk/d40.html

 

The nibs are interchangable with the section, is it the same section as the Manuscript Calligraphy sets ?

 

I believe the pen bodies are made by Sigma for Italix, and much like Sigma's other pens they look too kit penish for me (although Mr Ford stated somewhere that they definately aren't kit pens).

 

I've been using my Osmiroid 75 for a few days now. While it is a definate step up from the Osmiroid c/c pen i'd pen using before, it still feels lightweight and fragile (although the piston seems indesctructable). The clip for instance seems to break quite easily, as it has done with a 65 I've got with it and just about to with another 75 I also received.

 

I think I'm definately on the look out for an Esterbrook J to try the nibs in now (as the Osmiroid nibs are still amazing). Any recommendations for a reputable vintage Esterbrook dealer ? Prefer Europe, but will buy for the US. I note Brian Anderson doesn't appear to have any at the moment.

 

Otherwise, outside of custom nib grinds, I'm not seeing anything modern that fits the bill

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