Jump to content
Classifieds is broken, please do not submit any new ads ×

Nib Wiggle Lamy Safari



VatVVolf

Recommended Posts

Hello, guys! I was recently filling my lamy safari with bottled ink for the first time and I noticed that the nib wiggles, not up or down just to the sides a bit... is this normal? if it isn't is there any way for me to fix it?

-Wolf

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 10
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • GlennPen

    3

  • VatVVolf

    2

  • BakerMikeRomeo

    1

  • watch_art

    1

Mine doesn't "wiggle" either way. I'm no expert or a professional on such matters, but maybe "compressing/squeezing" the nib without over doing it?

See with what large letters I have written you with my own hand. GaVIxi

The pen is the interpreter of the soul: what one thinks, the other expresses. (MdC)

Link to post
Share on other sites
BakerMikeRomeo

My Lamy Safari does this, too. I always figured that it was because I, being a phule, have put it through the washing machine twice and the dryer once (bafflingly, not an atom of ink came out of it each time, but the one time I left my 78G in my pocket, it wrecked my favorite shirt :c ).

 

It doesn't seem to have any effect on its writing, but I do find it really annoying.

"Everything I do and say and the way I do and say it annoys me." ~William F. Buckley, Jr.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 year later...

It's actually quite common for any of Lamy's fixed-width stainless steel nibs (EF, F, M, & B ) to have "wiggle" room than their stub nibs. Couple days ago I was changing out the inks in my Lamy Al-Star (whose EF nib I've never removed until then). I noticed it wiggled, a lot. For comparison in making sure it was a nib problem and not a feed problem, I gathered three of my Lamy pens (2 Safari's and an Al-Star) and 4 Lamy nibs (EF, B, 1.1 and 1.5) and started swapping. In short, my hunch was correct; a fixed-width nib was more likely to be loose than a stub nib, the stub nibs pretty much clamped on to the feed where as the EF and B nib could be flicked off with you finger. My Al-Star had an unacceptably loose nib and I talked to the Support Team at the Goulet Pen Company about it. They sent me a replacement nib (before that I asked if they could fit it on an empty pen to check the fit), and now my Al-Star writes happily without it feeling like if I sneeze, the nib would shoot off!

 

Not to say get a Stub nib as opposed to something from EF-B, I only tested 4 nibs. Maybe this problem's been fixed since then I don't know, perhaps it so happend to be the way I found it, someone could have a wobbly stub nib. First thing I would do would be to check with whoever it is you bought the pen from or perhaps talk to Lamy directly. This really shouldn't be happening from such a big company.

Edited by GlennPen
Link to post
Share on other sites

I squish it carefully with some smooth jaw pliers to so the little wings on the nib hold onto the feed better. No more wiggling. :)

 

That's what I would do, too.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I squish it carefully with some smooth jaw pliers to so the little wings on the nib hold onto the feed better. No more wiggling. :)

 

It's one of the first things I've tried, but I guess I didn't try to crush it hard enough? Haha I don't know, but I guess it wouldn't hurt considering I have replacements anyway.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Fuellerfuehrerschein

(RE)TIGHTENING LAMY NIBS

 

I read you have encountered problems with Lamy nibs that became too loose for comfort. If you regularly exchange nibs on a Lamy fountain pen feed a wear induced phenomena of sliding metal Lamy nibs up and down on the accompanying plastic feeds that loosens the nibs over time is even quite normal.

 

There is a do it yourself method to (re)tighten Lamy form and friction fitted nibs so they cannot slide or otherwise move overly easy on and off their feeds. The method is somewhat counterintuitive and avoids the use of metal tools that could leave tool marks on the nib. Always keep in mind to work on nibs with caution and apply force in increasing increments.

 

Lamy_nibs_%2B_Lamy_Nexx.jpg

  1. First you have to place the Lamy nib on a hard flat surface like a table. To protect the table for dents caused by the 2 small L shaped metal nib profiles resting on the table it is a good idea to put some paper between the table and the nib.
  2. Find a rectangular straight piece of wood of roughly 20 to 25 cm (8 to 10 in) length.
  3. Then carefully rest the piece of wood on the top of the rear part of the Lamy nib where the Lamy logo and nib type designation are written. The wood should only cover the rear part up to the breather hole or the nib size designation in case of a stub nib. Beware to keep away from the front end of the nib where the breather hole and/or nib slit is!
  4. Now whist keeping the piece of wood parallel to the table carefully apply some downward force with your hands on the piece of wood. This will slightly deform the rear part of the Lamy nib that is used for the feed connection making it fit more tightly on the feed. Never press on the nib with great force to avoid excessive deformation! Instead gently apply pressure in increasing small increments whilst regularly checking if the rear part of the Lamy nib got deformed enough to appropriately fit on the feed.

If a Lamy nib is very tightly fitted on its feed and hard to remove by hand you can resort to grabbing the nib with a piece of rubber for extra grip. A more drastic method to remove an excessive tightly fitted Lamy nib is using sticking sticky tape stuck on the top of the nib to pull the nib off its feed.

Link to post
Share on other sites

That's an interesting way of doing it, seems less gruesome than the pliers method (mine have teeth on them).

 

I'll have a look around for something similar to a hard board and try it out with my EF nib (excessively loose). Thanks for that thorough post!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now







×
×
  • Create New...