Jump to content

Recommended Posts

TwelveDrawings

If you use only vintage, high-quality fountain pen, please move on. This subject matter is strictly for people like me who mess around with "genuine, non-imitation" plastic fountain pens.

 

Plastic pens can receive minor or major scratches. So can metal pens, but many metals can be polished to remove most scratches.

 

My Waterman Phileas began life as an inexpensive student pen. No lacquer finish. No solid-gold nib (at least that I've seen). No wood, glass, or ivory inlay. It was and still is a molded plastic pen cast in one solid color (and others bear a faux-marble appearance).

 

I shouldn't be finicky about this, but it bothers me when my favorite pen suffers cosmetic scratches or gets that hazy patina resulting from countless small scratches. I have tried buffing it back to a glossy shine using toothpaste. (Hey don't laugh—toothpaste is a very gentle polishing compound that works on certain plastics without creating new scratches.) But considerable work was required to produce any visible improvement.

 

I have one "freebie" Phileas that shows sings of a previous owner's butchery. They must have attempted to use a coarse grit sandpaper because the "polishing" left more scratches than it could possibly have removed. I would post photos but I seem to have used up my limit of download space.

 

Has anyone had any luck polishing or buffing scratches out of their Phileas? If so, please share. If you think it is absurd to put this much effort into a low-end plastic pen, please refer back to the first paragraph.

 

—www.twelvedrawings.com

Edited by TwelveDrawings

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 11
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • TwelveDrawings

    4

  • RMN

    1

  • Force

    1

  • mbankirer

    1

Personally I do not bother with this, but I think you can use the stuff to repair scratches in cellphone windows.

 

D.ick

~

KEEP SAFE, WEAR A MASK, KEEP A DISTANCE.

Freedom exists by virtue of self limitation.

~

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

In the UK I would use T-Cut which is an auto body polish for removing dull areas of paintwork or lacquer coating.

 

 

Ref pictures, use the Upload feature.

Edited by Force
Link to post
Share on other sites

Simichrome? Basically auto polish/rubbing compound works to get a nice patina....rub lightly or you will go right through!

Link to post
Share on other sites
TwelveDrawings

Simichrome? Basically auto polish/rubbing compound works to get a nice patina....rub lightly or you will go right through!

By "patina" do you mean a smooth, glossy shine or a slightly dull appearance? Just curious. --TD

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I use sun-shine cloth, a very mildly abrasive cloth, and sometimes add a bit of simichrome.

 

However, there is a point at which I stop shining a pen. I probably use the sunshine cloth and simichrome more to remove grime from old pens than to smooth out minor scratches.

 

Scratches mean you are using the pen. That makes the Phileas happy...nothing sadder than a workable fountain pen that sits always in the back of a drawer!

Washington Nationals 2019: the fight for .500; "stay in the fight"; WON the fight

Link to post
Share on other sites
J English Smith

I would try Novus plastic polish #2 or #3. It works wonderfully for Parker 51 barrels. Work in gently with a small Chamois cloth.

<i>"Most people go through life using up half their energy trying to protect a dignity they never had."</i><br>-Marlowe, in <i>The Long Goodbye</i>

Link to post
Share on other sites
TwelveDrawings

I would try Novus plastic polish #2 or #3. It works wonderfully for Parker 51 barrels. Work in gently with a small Chamois cloth.

Thanks to YouTube, have been able to review each of the solutions suggested here. Each is, of course, intended for another purpose. Some make me anxious because their intended use is polishing metal or paint. Others are made for specific plastics, such as plexiglass, but I cannot determine what plastic my Phileas is cast from.

 

My wife has suggested that I experiment with the polish used to remove scratches from DVD disks. That seems like a safe first step...considering that toothpaste did not have the right polishing effect. I will post my results, if any are worth sharing. -- T.D.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

In the UK I would use T-Cut which is an auto body polish for removing dull areas of paintwork or lacquer coating.

 

 

Ref pictures, use the Upload feature.

i use something similar, but can't remember the brand -a friend gave it to me... it works well!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Cellphone screen polish -- displex. Though, personally I prefer Novus. Displex is good for "some" demonstrator pens. Careful though, it can cause haziness is some vintage materials (ex. Sheaffer Craftsman)

Link to post
Share on other sites
TwelveDrawings

Cellphone screen polish -- displex. Though, personally I prefer Novus. Displex is good for "some" demonstrator pens. Careful though, it can cause haziness is some vintage materials (ex. Sheaffer Craftsman)

I will try the cellphone screen polish first, because it sounds the least abraisive. Starting mild and progressively getting more abraisive is probably a safe strategy. That, and using my worst-case pen as a guinea pig.

 

-- www.TwelveDrawings.com

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Most Contributions

    1. amberleadavis
      amberleadavis
      37511
    2. PAKMAN
      PAKMAN
      30190
    3. Ghost Plane
      Ghost Plane
      28220
    4. jar
      jar
      26101
    5. wimg
      wimg
      25566
  • Upcoming Events

  • Blog Comments

    • A Smug Dill
      Even so, you'd end up with a fragmented list, and it becomes an O(N²) process for each prospective requestor to check what is available: effectively recreate the list of currently active servers (without any reliable up-to-date info upfront about the inks and number of samples on offer in the thread) from the sequential list of posts, which may be spread over two or even more pages, and then query each server independently to check what is currently on offer.   It comes down to not hav
    • LizEF
      If one wanted to do this, one could just use the "About Me" field which appears to be unlimited in size.  And if a bunch of people wanted to cooperate, the Member Title field (or signature) could be used to this end - "Ink Giver" (or some such) could be used by those with inks to give...  No software edits required.
    • Arkanabar
      I suppose the update issue could be mitigated.  One would post a link in signature, to the particular part of your profile where you list the inks that you're willing to post samples to others, gratis.  But looking at profiles, I suspect that would require an edit to the board's software, potentially a nontrivial task.
    • A Smug Dill
      I read your idea as getting willing givers to publicly register as members of a set of heterogenous servers, in a system in which a client would explicitly select an available server from a list, to which he/she will then send a request privately and asynchronously. Request handling in the system is unmanaged, and individual requests are handled by the targeted servers completely independently on each other. I think the model is fine, although there are some operational concerns you may want to
    • Daneaxe
      First thought on the method/system of ink sharing: Think the best way, to begin with, is to follow the way of the US thread: offer up a (small) list of inks you are willing to PIF, to whoever expresses interest. Write clearly in the "mission statement" how it works, with a tiny "quid pro quo" that even a struggling student can comply with, i.e. post your opinion and a writing sample, with option of a full review if desired.   So yours truly might say: "I'm offering up samples of D
  • Chatbox

    You don't have permission to chat.
    Load More
  • Expiring Soon

    • By benbot517
      51 years and 5 months
    • By benbot517
      51 years and 5 months
    • By benbot517
      51 years and 5 months
    • By Okami
      51 years and 5 months
    • By Okami
      51 years and 5 months
  • Random Adverts

  • Files

  • Today's Birthdays

    1. aloofy
      aloofy
      (38 years old)
    2. Aplekan
      Aplekan
      (34 years old)
    3. bardiir
      bardiir
      (36 years old)
    4. bbrovold
      bbrovold
      (68 years old)
    5. Bill_Sauers
      Bill_Sauers
      (51 years old)





×
×
  • Create New...