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First Fountain Pen


markscamilleri
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Hi all! I've suddenly decided that I want to start using a fountain pen. I would like to know some pens that are great for beginners, but professional looking ;) . I am a student, so chances are that when I am not using my computer, I would be using the fountain pen.

 

Also, I don't know which is better, cartridge or ink (from the pot) and I appreciate help in that section as well.

 

Thanks

 

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Welcome to the FPN! :D

Short answer: Lamy Safari Charcoal. IMO the best student pen out there, it's relatively inexpensive, professional looking and the nib interchangeability is a great plus :thumbup: . They come with a cartridge included, which I fill with a syringe; for be, bottled ink is the best, very cheap compared to the cartridges and you can choose from a massive variety of colors. I keep a cursive 1.5 italic nib in my Safari for bold writing and signatures, but depending on your preference, you will find a great variety of nibs, suitable for all tastes. Hope that helped. Cheers

Edited by dragos.mocanu

"The truth may be puzzling. It may take some work to grapple with. It may be counterintuitive. It may contradict deeply held prejudices. It may not be consonant with what we desperately want to be true. But our preferences do not determine what's true..." (Carl Sagan)

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I second what dragos said- Lami Safari is amazing. I write with a xf nib, because my handwriting is rather small, and it is fantastic. You can't go wrong with it. I do, however, strongly suggest getting bottled ink and a converter. Waterman and Diamine are, IMO, the most reliable brands for that.

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Welcome to the FPN! :D

Short answer: Lamy Safari Charcoal. IMO the best student pen out there, it's relatively inexpensive, professional looking and the nib interchangeability is a great plus :thumbup: . They come with a cartridge included, which I fill with a syringe; for be, bottled ink is the best, very cheap compared to the cartridges and you can choose from a massive variety of colors. I keep a cursive 1.5 italic nib in my Safari for bold writing and signatures, but depending on your preference, you will find a great variety of nibs, suitable for all tastes. Hope that helped. Cheers

Thanks, how would I know which nib to choose? Is there a way to know which nib is suitable for which handwriting?

 

I second what dragos said- Lami Safari is amazing. I write with a xf nib, because my handwriting is rather small, and it is fantastic. You can't go wrong with it. I do, however, strongly suggest getting bottled ink and a converter. Waterman and Diamine are, IMO, the most reliable brands for that.

Thanks

 

It would be helpful to know what your budget is to recommend something suitable. :)

under 20 Euros....

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Another vote for a Lamy Safari. It is a good quality pen and is inexpensive. I suggest this pen for a few reasons: you are new to FPs and should get something inexpensive in case you don't like them, this is a good pen therefore you would be buying quality at a low price, you can buy different sized nibs for this pen at a low price (around $15 US) and switch them easily so you can try different nibs without buying multiple pens. They come in multiple colors and if you want "professional" get a black or charcoal one.

 

Regarding cartridges, that is a personal preference. I don't like them and prefer to use bottled ink. Converters are inexpensive ($5 US) and easy to use so I don't really get why people refill old cartridges with a syringe.

 

Nib choices: I started with medium and like it. For note-taking you might want to go with a fine nib. I would suggest not getting an italic nib to start since it is a little more difficult to write with, especially for your purpose, but if you want to try one I'd suggest the 1.1mm.

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Another vote for the Lamy Safari. Medium nib is a safe starting point also (and will e the default nib with just about any pen).

 

 

 

While I prefer to use bottled ink most people find that cartridges are simpler and more convenient. They are probably a good option while you try out a FP for the first time. If you continue to use it and want to explore more inks then get a converter and the world is your oyster...

Non-poster.
Current loves - MB 149, Pelikan M1000

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Thanks, how would I know which nib to choose? Is there a way to know which nib is suitable for which handwriting?

 

Thanks

 

under 20 Euros....

 

I personally would suggest a fine or medium nib! These are the best for regular, everyday writing. Most people say Lamy nibs are wider than the American counterparts of the same size (for example the Lamy fine is like a Parker Medium and so on)...but I honestly like my Medium nib from Lamy...not too wide for my handwriting. Also, wider nibs help you make an impression. You should be able to find this pen at ~20 euros, shipping included. Good luck.

Edit: Seriously, why do people put cartridges and bottled ink in two different categories? You can buy bottled ink (cheaper, greater variety) and fill the same cartridge (after cleaning it of course, in case you change the color or brand of ink!) using a syringe. The Lamy converter has a 0.8 ml capacity, and the cartridge 1.3 ml! I personally bought a converter so I could clean the pen using it, every once in a while.

Edited by dragos.mocanu

"The truth may be puzzling. It may take some work to grapple with. It may be counterintuitive. It may contradict deeply held prejudices. It may not be consonant with what we desperately want to be true. But our preferences do not determine what's true..." (Carl Sagan)

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ok, I was looking on ebay and I found one with a left-handed nib. I failed to mention earlier that i am left-handed, sry about that... anyway. should I use a normal nib or a left-handed one? What's the difference?

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It's a no brainer, if you are left handed, you should get the LH nib of course.

"The truth may be puzzling. It may take some work to grapple with. It may be counterintuitive. It may contradict deeply held prejudices. It may not be consonant with what we desperately want to be true. But our preferences do not determine what's true..." (Carl Sagan)

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Ok, but it could hae been a gimmick... don't forget I'm still new. Also, how will this differ my writing as opposed to a normal nib?

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I think a Lamy Safari is a good choice.

 

Another option would be a Pelikan Pelikano or a Pelikan Th.ink

 

As a third option I would recommend a Rotring Artpen.

There is a wide variety of nib sizes for the Artpen available.

The italic nibs on the Artpen are great (but to start I would recommend a standard nib, EF, F or M depending on your writing preferences and writing size)

 

The Pelikan Pens and the Artpen uses international cartridges.

The Lamy uses proprietary Lamy cartridges.

 

I would also suggest to use an ink converter to be able to use bottled ink (cheaper and all color possibilities)

As previously said converters are not expensive.

If you buy the Artpen buy an Rotring Artpen converter, they fit better (tighter) then international converters.

I've good experiences with Pelikan converters (manufactured by Schmidt).

I would not recommend the cheapest Chinese international converters.

If you choose the Lamy you have to take the Lamy Converter anyway.

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I think a Lamy Safari is a good choice.

 

Another option would be a Pelikan Pelikano or a Pelikan Th.ink

 

As a third option I would recommend a Rotring Artpen.

There is a wide variety of nib sizes for the Artpen available.

The italic nibs on the Artpen are great (but to start I would recommend a standard nib, EF, F or M depending on your writing preferences and writing size)

 

The Pelikan Pens and the Artpen uses international cartridges.

The Lamy uses proprietary Lamy cartridges.

 

I would also suggest to use an ink converter to be able to use bottled ink (cheaper and all color possibilities)

As previously said converters are not expensive.

If you buy the Artpen buy an Rotring Artpen converter, they fit better (tighter) then international converters.

I've good experiences with Pelikan converters (manufactured by Schmidt).

I would not recommend the cheapest Chinese international converters.

If you choose the Lamy you have to take the Lamy Converter anyway.

Thanks, but I think I'll chose the Lamy Safari.... I'll probably convert it anyway.

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The Lamy Safari is a good entry level suggestion, but I recommend you try it before you buy it. The triangle shaped grip section was a deal breaker for me. I could not hold it comfortably. I'm not sure what the Waterman Phileas is going for these days, but it's another good entry level pen.

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The Lamy Safari is a good entry level suggestion, but I recommend you try it before you buy it. The triangle shaped grip section was a deal breaker for me. I could not hold it comfortably. I'm not sure what the Waterman Phileas is going for these days, but it's another good entry level pen.

The Waterman Phileas does look nice, but the Lamy looks more me-ish....

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Another vote for the Lamy Safari, Medium Nib... this is the first pen I ever bought myself years ago, and have never regretted it. IMHO, it is a great way to enter the FP world, and you can only go much better from here, whether your future preferences will be for vintage or more contemporary ones.

 

Enjoy the journey!

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Edit: Seriously, why do people put cartridges and bottled ink in two different categories? You can buy bottled ink (cheaper, greater variety) and fill the same cartridge (after cleaning it of course, in case you change the color or brand of ink!) using a syringe.

Because when you use a cartridge, that's it. Done. Finished. Task complete.

 

Because bottled ink requires a piston pen, converter, syringe (and and a cartridge), tissues, and/or other hardware. It means getting your fingers inky. It means buying a new rug when the cat knocks over the bottle.

 

 

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Because when you use a cartridge, that's it. Done. Finished. Task complete.

 

Because bottled ink requires a piston pen, converter, syringe (and and a cartridge), tissues, and/or other hardware. It means getting your fingers inky. It means buying a new rug when the cat knocks over the bottle.

 

 

 

Then let's just call it 'using bottled ink and a cartridge'...at least that's what I do with 2 of my daily writers, a Lamy Safari and a Parker 45 ...I have converters for both, but they really lack capacity.

"The truth may be puzzling. It may take some work to grapple with. It may be counterintuitive. It may contradict deeply held prejudices. It may not be consonant with what we desperately want to be true. But our preferences do not determine what's true..." (Carl Sagan)

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hey guys. Thanks for all this help! Can anyone tell me what difference the left handed nib will do? Thanks

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