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Ebay Sellers And Incorrect Descriptions-Wwyd


Loeschpapier
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I looked around a bit through the search function, but didn't quite come a thread of its own that deals with this dilemma, the question of incorrect item descriptions.

 

I was looking around ebay and found a few items that were of interest to me, low budget, nothing major in the fountain pen world - more sentimental to me.

Item number one was described as piston filler although the picture clearly demonstrated it to be an aerometric filler. Didn't think much of it, the guy is obviously selling antiques and vintage stuff, not a fountain lover. Could happen, right?

 

Saw the next item on the list and it was described as "pen in original box." (just said 'pen' in the description)

The FOUNTAIN PEN depicted looked just as expected. The seller took close-ups of the pen box - and that included a big, fat stamp that said "retractable ball point pen."
Seller is probably not speaking the language and went by the number of the series - the way Pelikan would say M400, for either ball point, or fountain pen. (it's not a Pelikan...I'm just using that as an example)

So there is no way the box is original.

 

The seller has over a lot of positive feedback, over 1000.

 

What would you do?? The last item is 'just' 30 Dollars and yet it bugs me to see wrong descriptions. I know what I'm seeing and buying - but would other people know?? Would you contact the seller, explain it and see if the seller would be willing to change the price - or would you just inform ebay about this?

 

My question is not a question about the specific pen - more about the moral compass of such a transaction.

The seller seems reliable in general, but at least two fountain pen descriptions were already incorrect.

I mean, you probably wouldn't inform someone who about the worth of the ultimate collector's item if the seller priced it at 20 Dollars "buy it now." We all would buy and be thrilled about a deal.

 

But what would you do in this case? Click on over to the next item? Contact the seller? I think most of us would be unhappy to purchase something that deviates from the written description. It's more a moral quandary for me. What to do?

Edited by Loeschpapier

http://i209.photobucket.com/albums/bb282/Borderlineescape/JournalandPelikanforFountainPenNetworkSiggie-1-1.jpg

"I amar prestar aen, han mathon ne nen, han mathon ne chae a han noston ned 'wilith."

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If the person has a good rating I contact them and say something like "We all need to watch out for and help each other and just FYI, the ..."

 

Usually they thank me and add additional information to clarify things. If they are snotty and if it is something that could mislead a buyer I report the item to eBay.

 

My Website

 

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If the person has a good rating I contact them and say something like "We all need to watch out for and help each other and just FYI, the ..."

 

Usually they thank me and add additional information to clarify things. If they are snotty and if it is something that could mislead a buyer I report the item to eBay.

Thanks, Jar! I was wondering if others had bothered to contact a seller. Good diplomatic way of testing the waters.

http://i209.photobucket.com/albums/bb282/Borderlineescape/JournalandPelikanforFountainPenNetworkSiggie-1-1.jpg

"I amar prestar aen, han mathon ne nen, han mathon ne chae a han noston ned 'wilith."

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The best buys are always the ones auction rooms misjudge and give wrong descriptions to. Recently a friend sent me a link. It said 19th century clock and it was a big auction house in Brussels. I took a look and saw that it was extremely rare, late 17th century and from Brussels and signed by a top name (but that maker is only mentioned in 1 book with a magnificent piece from the same era). It was complete, it had been restored for a couple of thousands I later found out and I saw the pictures from the restaurer (everything complete before restauration), but the lady who owned it and had it serviced for a few thousands had died and the family wanted money. Since it is a friend we agreed that he would bid as high as he could and that he was allowed to bid for me higher than his limit. He got it for 1700 euro (and I felt a bit sorry, but I'm happy it is in the right hands). It would fetch at least ten tot 20 times that at Tefaf. A lot of people don't look but just read what others write. Looking first then judging that's the trick.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
www.bermond.be

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Thanks, Jar! I was wondering if others had bothered to contact a seller. Good diplomatic way of testing the waters.

 

I'll routinely contact seller with as jar said good reps to let them know of serious errors in a listing.

I've always found them appreciative too.

 

Bruce in Ocala, Fl

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There can be a judement call here on ebay stuff. If I have no interest in the item I try to politely help them out, if it doesn't up their knowledge of the value. If I am interested in buying an item that is undervalued by the description I might keep my opinion to myself. Then, others will probably make the same assessment and bidding proceeds. This might help the seller.

 

A lot of the material on ebay is mined from estates. These people who resell the items might not know about the items, true. I think there is a side of this where tipping off the seller works to the disadvantage of other ebayers if you enlighten an ignorant seller of an undervaluation. The point is that knowledge has a value. The seller has a certain responsibility to know about items they are offering. They should research items and check market value. If the seller will not invest the time and effort to do this, they do not deserve to realize the full value in a sale. If they get it OK, but if the item sells low, that's life.You pay for what you don't know. If the seller doesn't have specialized knowledge of an item, maybe the seller should sell it to another seller. I never feel a responsibility to tell a seller they have an item more valuable than described. That is my and your advantage. I am not giving that away. That's commerce.

 

In cases where the seller has incorrectly described an item as more valuable than it plainly is, my attempts to enlighten a seller have not helped. So, I make no more such attempts. Ebay and paypal have some buyer protection in these cases, so I am incurring no more seller insults.

 

With the buyer protections in ebay, I think "let the seller beware." When there is a deficiency, as in no pictures, something glaring that would be to everyone's benefit to clarify, I might message the seller. I don't message the seller to cause the valuation to go up. The other buyers are your competitors, but you don't have to screw everybody over by tipping off a seller, but common sense should help you out.

 

I have communicated with a whole lot of nice ebay sellers. And then there others about whom the best that can be said is bleep-em. With the hand moving in a large upward arc.

"Don't hurry, don't worry. It's better to be late at the Golden Gate than to arrive in Hell on time."
--Sign in a bar and grill, Ormond Beach, Florida, 1960.

 

 

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I contact sellers whenever I find inaccuracies and/or the need for additional information. Since eBay is suppose to be a community, I feel that the members of the community should help one another to do their best and to be their best. I have found sellers to be VERY appreciative of the corrections and additional information that I send as they prefer accurate, informative listings as well as those that allow them to avoid disputes. I have made several nice pen-friiends and general eBay-friends that way, making my eBay buying all the more enjoyable.

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  • 4 weeks later...

I find this both good and bad for us as knowledgeable buyers. Even though incorrect descriptions can be annoying, sometimes a seller could incorrectly describe an expensive item for one that is cheap. For a good example, I once saw on ebay a seller selling a "silver plated bowl". I looked at the pictures and I noticed markers that indicated it was Italian 800 pure silver, and I purchased it for the incredible price of $20. I sold it at a cash for gold place the day I received it for $480, and this was all on behalf on the sellers incorrect description. Just as an update, I purchased another used Montblanc 149 with the profits.

Always forgive your enemies; nothing annoys them so much.

 

—Oscar Wilde

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I just came across an M200 on the bay that was described as a MK30. Seller had no idea as the pen was a gift and he really didn't know fountain pens. I gave him some information for which he was very grateful and corrected his listing. This was just someone uninformed who is not a regular pen dealer so I try to help them out if I spot obvious errors. It hasn't been often that I've needed to do this but I find most people receptive and appreciative.

PELIKAN - Too many birds in the flock to count. My pen chest has proven to be a most fertile breeding ground.

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If the person has a good rating I contact them and say something like "We all need to watch out for and help each other and just FYI, the ..."

 

Usually they thank me and add additional information to clarify things. If they are snotty and if it is something that could mislead a buyer I report the item to eBay.

 

As a seller, I am always appreciative when someone notes an issue in my listing and lets me know so I can correct it.

Thomas
Baton Rouge, LA
(tbickiii)

Check out my ebay pen listings
:
  tbickiii's Vintage Fountain Pens

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