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Can Anyone Show Me An Of Nib Writing Sample?



lambretta88

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lambretta88

Hello!

I was wondering if anyone of you has a Parker Duofold (or maybe another pen) with an Oblique Fine nib? I was looking everywhere for some writing/drawing OF samples ....in vain :(

I would like to know if an oblique nib would help me create some more line variation while drawing or would it skip all the time while not holding to a certain angle?

I always tend to turn the nib towards me when I write and draw... actually when I draw I twist the pen all the time in all directions and use all the sides of the nib. I did not realise that until I watched a video of my hands while I draw...

And if I turn an oblique upside down, does it produce a thinner line like the rounded nibs?

I have some dip pens with reverse oblique nibs. They are totally flat, sharp as hell and a bit too broad for detailed drawing so they don't really help me imagine how an OF would work.

The thing is I finally ordered my new Duofold. It comes with an F nib...but I could exchange the nib within 4 weeks. I'm really interested in the OF but I'm not sure if I can test it anywhere in Berlin... In all the stores I've been to I've been told I will probably have to send my pen to Parker (in Hamburg I think) if I'm not happy with the F nib.

Sorry for writing a novel :( Here is one of my sketches...I'm interested in a nib that would create long, organic lines and give me lots of line variation....

Thank you for any help!

Ewa

http://ewaludwi.files.wordpress.com/2012/11/smoke.jpg?w=500&h=836

 

Edited by lambretta88
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MisterBoll

There is an Osmia 448 in the classifieds with an oblique fine nib - one photo of writing sample.

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I'm not really convinced an OF is going to give much in the way of line variation.

 

I might be wrong here but I imagine the 'sweet spot' of an oblique fine would be quite small - also Parker nibs tend to run a bit wider than others (in my experience) - so their F might be considered more towards the medium.

 

I'm no artist but would a flex nib be better for variation?

 

carl

"Ask not what you can do for your country. Ask what's for lunch" Orson Welles

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There is an Osmia 448 in the classifieds with an oblique fine nib - one photo of writing sample.

That writing sample seems to prove me wrong then - but it is a flex pen and so the variation is more likely flex than the oblique nature of the nib.

"Ask not what you can do for your country. Ask what's for lunch" Orson Welles

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I,ve picked up quite a few left foot oblique nibs over the years (6-7 or so), and I cant write with the majority of them. I have a P51 left foot ob, and i cant even get a constant line down with this pen.

 

Must be my writing style. Can only suggest that you visit a Montblanc store, and try their tester set (MB 146, all variations of nib style). There is also a pinned thread on MB nib styles with writing sample on the MB forum.

 

Best of luck, Paul

Edited by sherbie
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This is a nice sketch. I also do sketch with FP sometimes and I think what you really need is a smooth flexible fine.

 

For example a vintage Waterman's, like my 52 with a almost wet noodle nib.

 

http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3800/8877261528_7074429d77_c.jpg

 

or another example, a Conklin Endura like this:

 

http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8095/8400909967_6bb546054a_c.jpg

 

 

and my favourite is a Pelikan 400 with extra flexible Steno nib:

 

http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8009/7512904524_115f450969_c.jpg

 

...sorry, no Parker.

 

I think that OF, OM, OB...etc nibs aren't suitable for sketching. But that's just my 2 Cents.

 

Christof

 

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Hi Ewa!

 

First and foremost of all, what a nice drawing! :thumbup:

Now, getting back to the subject of the OF nib, since you twist the pen at all angles when you write and draw, I must agree with Christof, this nib wouldn't be suitable for drawing, just for writing and at a specific angle. I also concur to the use of a flexible nib, especially in drawing.

 

Aris

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lambretta88

Thanks for your help....I do have a pen with a flexible nib and I do use it for drawing. I also draw with firm modern round nibs and I love them.

 

I was actually only interested in some modern oblique nib writing samples because they are said to create more expressive lines than round nibs. I am just really curious of what they can do.

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  • 8 months later...

I agree with @carlc that the sweet spot for oblique is smaller, and it will appear to catch on the paper more often. I would recommend a flex but since you’ve already owned one, you could consider a cursive italic so that the fine lines aren’t as thick as a stub yet…? I have happened to try a friend’s oblique flex, now that is what you might be dreaming of—it gives you variation both with and without flexing! It was a 1950s Mont Blanc by the way, and I’m still looking for one within my budget. May I ask which flex fountain pen do you own?

———calligraphy———fountain pens———paper———books———typography———colours———conservation———

 

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I don't think you will find an italic nib to be suitable for drawing. The line variation will not occur at times when you might want it. Flexible nibs work better for drawing. In order to do a little test to see if you might like an italic nib, I suggest you do a little experimenting with a calligraphy felt tip marker.

And the end of all our exploring

Will be to arrive where we started

And know the place for the first time. TS Eliot

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