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Delta Fusion Nibs


art8283
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I would be interested in any opinions related to the use of Delta's fusion nibs and the claim that the two metals used creates a slight degree of heat, thereby improving ink flow. Thanks in advance for your replies.

 

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I have the stub and it is a wonderful nib. Do I buy into the whole 2 metals creating a better flow etc... not really. BUT I will say that it really is a great nib on a great pen that I LOVE !

 

I did a review a while back on mine when I got it

 

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I am not sure whether it really does help in improving the ink flow.

Of all the inks I have been using, the inkflows are great.

I also gotten the stub nib and it is a really smooth nib.

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The FPGeeks have rather excoriated the semi-magical claims of the mystical bond of the nib parts. I leave alchemy to the middle ages, but the pen is still quite nice.

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The nib is definitely bonded - soldered on from the bottom or something. I was thinking the gold part was just held on with little tabs that fitted through the steel nib. I took one apart and it was definitely bonded somehow. I still don't see how it could make any difference in ink flow though. I'd say magical claims can be ignored. If you like the look of the pen and nib, get one. They're a really great value. Who knows - I may end up with one myself one day. :)

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It does state that in the literature that comes with the pen. I have no idea how the layman would be able to measure the amount of heat generated by the action of the bi-metallic nib! BUT it does write butter-smooth and I have the F nib which, being European, lays down a slightly wider line than my Platinum 3776 F or my Pilot Custom 74 F nib.

Pat Barnes a.k.a. billz

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While I have a degree in Metallurgical Engineering, I'm no expert.

 

Personally, I think the technical claim is BS, and I'm not referring to a college degree. Still. it's a very nice pen and based on my limited trial in a shop, the nib writes great. If you like it, ignore the claim, but by all means buy and enjoy the pen.

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I have a stub fusion nib and I like it a lot. I use it daily. Ink flow seems to be well controlled, not overly wet, but the writing seems to be darker in the first sentence of writing and gets a little lighter in the second sentence of writing. Not a big issue and I am enjoying using the pen.

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I enjoy mine. I have a Fusion 82 with a stub nib. It writes beautifully and has not had problems with ink flow (so far). I really can't say if the ink flows more smoothly because of the two metals in the nib, but the pen is quite nice.

http://i176.photobucket.com/albums/w161/drwwe/FD1DC745-7A2C-424A-B1A4-610B312AE900-7628-00001A5AB2DAD2DF.jpg

http://i176.photobucket.com/albums/w161/drwwe/845FB490-538E-454D-8D3B-E2DE0E5B707F-7628-00001A5B57E73044.jpg

 

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I have one of these nibs on a Delta made for the FountainPen.it Forum. The stub nib is extremely smooth - more than any other unmodified stub I've used, and it flows well. No idea about the metallurgical claims, but it sure writes nice!

 

fpn_1368550484__delta_500_1_1024x719.jpg

 

Here's a comparison writing sample with a couple other Italian pens with stub nibs:

fpn_1368550714__italian_pens_11-27-12_2_

 

And the three nibs side by side:

fpn_1368550755__italian_pens_11-27-12_1_

 

 

By the way, I agree this thread should be in the Italian Pen forum; I'm moving it over.

How small of all that human hearts endure,
That part which laws or kings can cause or cure.

— Samuel Johnson

 

Instagram: dcpritch

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I have a Delta Hippocratica with fine fusion nib. It does not write any better than a steel nib. In my opinion the fusion nib is just a marketing ploy that also reduces the amount of gold content compared to a solid gold nib. Give me a solid 14 kt or 18 kt nib any day. Just my two cents.

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The basics of heat transfer: heat moves from high temperature to low temperature.

 

Under normal conditions a nib and it's surroundings will be at the same temperature; therefore, there will be no net heat flow and the thermal conductivity of the nib materials (gold, steel, glue, and tipping material) won't make any difference whatsoever.

Edited by raging.dragon
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It does state that in the literature that comes with the pen. I have no idea how the layman would be able to measure the amount of heat generated by the action of the bi-metallic nib! BUT it does write butter-smooth and I have the F nib which, being European, lays down a slightly wider line than my Platinum 3776 F or my Pilot Custom 74 F nib.

There is no heat generated by the bi-metallic nib. The only (non-magical) way for such a thing to happen would be a chemical reaction between the metals, or between one or both metals and something in the air (like oxygen) or ink (like water). First, there is no such reaction between gold and stainless steel. Second, if different metals were chosen such that there was such a reaction, the reaction would destroy the nib over time.

Edited by raging.dragon
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There is no heat generated by the bi-metallic nib. The only (non-magical) way for such a thing to happen would be a chemical reaction between the metals, or between one or both metals and something in the air (like oxygen) or ink (like water). First, there is no such reaction between gold and stainless steel. Second, if different metals were chosen such that there was such a reaction, the reaction would destroy the nib over time.

 

 

as the Mythbusters would scream at the end of an episode...

 

SCIENCE!!!

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I don't know if the heat transfer stuff is true, although I tend to put it in the marketing BS category. Anyway the nib is simply awesome, it writes very smooth, although a bit too wide for my tastes. It is also very good looking, which is not bad.

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Not my cup of ink. i gave mine to my brother instead.

The pen I write with, is the pen I use to sign my name.

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I'll just add my experience to those who say that the pen writes very well. I got one in December and it's a great pen. Of course, the other Delta pen that I have with a steel nib (the Scrigno) also writes very well and seems equally smooth. This seems like an overall marketing ploy and a way to save money on a reduction in the use of gold.

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I have seen many positive reactions on this stub. I have one myself on the Hippocratica and I like it very much, straight out of the box.

 

 

About the gold-metal bonding, I guess there could be an electrical current, because of redox-reactions. But that was a long time ago at school for me, and know Gold to be very stable, I can't predict the exact reaction.

 

D.ick

~

KEEP SAFE, WEAR A MASK, KEEP A DISTANCE.

Freedom exists by virtue of self limitation.

~

 

 

 

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Another vote for great nib regardless of the chemistry!

The rung of a ladder was never meant to rest upon, but only to hold a man's foot long enough to enable him to put the other somewhat higher - Thomas Huxley

http://img525.imageshack.us/img525/606/letterji9.png

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