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Inks To Avoid Using In A Nakaya?


persco
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Has anyone had their converter clog due to the ink used?

 

I was using Sailor Jentle Grenade which I love, but now I'm not able to flush out the converter because I cannot get the piston to move. I was able to move the piston downward but as there was still some ink left, the piston is stuck! I've been soaking it the last two days, first in plain water now overnight in pen flush.

 

Can anyone make a recommendation as to what can be done now? Should I call Classic Pens?

 

 

Thanks

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My Nakaya performs its' absolute best with Sailor Yama Dori or Epinard - smooth, wet, lovely.

"how do I know what I think until I write it down?"

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I currently use Iroshizuku (yamaguri) and Conway Stewart (essentially Diamine) in my Nakaya pens. No problems so far but I do not have enough mileage on them to assess long-term viability. I trust these inks in general and use them in quite a few pens.

 

For any high-end pen or pens that have been professionally tuned, I use die-base inks (interchangeably) like Iroshizuku, J. Herbin (the fountain pen series not the super saturated limited editions nor the caligraphy inks), Pelikan Edelstein, Diamine (and Conway Stewart), Waterman, Parker Quinck, and Montblanc. I use Montegrappa, Omas, and Aurora for their own pens and no other.

 

I use Noodler's Bulletproof ink for one or two pens dedicated to writing checks or signing documents, making sure to flush them regularly (every three or four months). I store them nib pointing up when not in use.

 

Personally, I would stay away from the following:

 

Wancher inks as they seem saturated and smudge on paper even when dry (I noticed this with black and green in pens that write wet - I have like five pens to flush, now that I noticed this). I will try diluting the ink a bit and see what shakes.

Omas red as it leaves a gummy residue on my vintage 360 demonstrator.

Pigment-based inks unless you use daily and clean regularly (plan for two to four water flushes a year). I found that Noodler's baystate requires soaking in (ammonia-based) cleaning solutions to clean out properly (tested on glass bottle) so I definitely keep away from it except in my Platinum Preppy's, of which I have quite a few.

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My Nakayas and Platinums appeared not to like Herbin Rouge Hematite, the flow was quite dry and unpleasant although the ink is more on the wet side in other pens. Maybe it doesn't work well with the feed or whatever.

 

Else they write with everything I throw at them, usually.

Read more about me, my pens, photography & so on my little blog

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My Nakayas and Platinums appeared not to like Herbin Rouge Hematite, the flow was quite dry and unpleasant although the ink is more on the wet side in other pens. Maybe it doesn't work well with the feed or whatever.

 

Else they write with everything I throw at them, usually.

 

The Rouge Hematite is highly saturated and can clog pens as a result. It is beautiful on paper but I would not use it for extended periods in one of my fountain pens. Have you had it in service in your fountain pens for a while? I have avoided using it for any length of time in any of my pens but if your experience says different I am willing to try it. What pens have worked for you?

 

Cheers.

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Thank you, everyone! While I thought Sailor Grenade was the perfect ink for my Nakaya, it does not like my Nakaya!

 

Thank you, Earthdawn, for your video and the tip on taking apart the converter. It was invaluable!

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My favourite inks so far in my Nakayas are the Sailor Kiwa-Guro Black and Sei-Boku Pigmented Nano inks, and Iroshizuku Tsuki-yo. I have had no problem with the ink changeovers either. I use a syringe to clean out the feed and converter. Worked like a charm so far.

 

I cannot believe how fantastic these pens are. Amazing.

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The Rouge Hematite is highly saturated and can clog pens as a result. It is beautiful on paper but I would not use it for extended periods in one of my fountain pens. Have you had it in service in your fountain pens for a while? I have avoided using it for any length of time in any of my pens but if your experience says different I am willing to try it. What pens have worked for you?

 

Cheers.

 

Except for said dry flow in my Nakaya/Platinum pens I haven't had any reason to complain so far! I remember using it in my Homo Sapiens and a Montblanc John Lennon and probably a number of other pens I don't recall. In all of them the ink was well behaved and not too hard to flush out as well - reds usually take a little longer to flush out but nothing out of the ordinary. The narrow opening of the bottle is a nuisance though!

 

I have to say I'm a little surprised to hear one should avoid this ink because of "high saturation". I've used a number of highly saturated inks (Diamine Majestic Blue, Private Reserve Electric DC Blue, Iroshizuku Asa-gao for instance) and none has given me trouble except for the occasional smear on smooth paper. Some feed-nib-combinations actually seem to love saturated inks and work better with them than with more "watery" colors.

 

Still, your mileage may vary and if you feel uncomfortable with any ink, don't use it. :)

Read more about me, my pens, photography & so on my little blog

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Except for said dry flow in my Nakaya/Platinum pens I haven't had any reason to complain so far! I remember using it in my Homo Sapiens and a Montblanc John Lennon and probably a number of other pens I don't recall. In all of them the ink was well behaved and not too hard to flush out as well - reds usually take a little longer to flush out but nothing out of the ordinary. The narrow opening of the bottle is a nuisance though!

 

I have to say I'm a little surprised to hear one should avoid this ink because of "high saturation". I've used a number of highly saturated inks (Diamine Majestic Blue, Private Reserve Electric DC Blue, Iroshizuku Asa-gao for instance) and none has given me trouble except for the occasional smear on smooth paper. Some feed-nib-combinations actually seem to love saturated inks and work better with them than with more "watery" colors.

 

Still, your mileage may vary and if you feel uncomfortable with any ink, don't use it. :)

 

Well, I guess I'll try it and see. With saturated inks, I assumed that drying ink would leave more sediment behind and would eventually not flow properly (because the remaining ink would already be saturated and would not dissolve the sediment) but I am no chemist. Experience of others is best indicator though so I will try it in one of my wet pens. Thanks.

 

Cheers.

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Well, I guess I'll try it and see. With saturated inks, I assumed that drying ink would leave more sediment behind and would eventually not flow properly (because the remaining ink would already be saturated and would not dissolve the sediment) but I am no chemist. Experience of others is best indicator though so I will try it in one of my wet pens. Thanks.

 

Cheers.

 

Highly saturated inks take longer to flush, and harder to clean out if allowed to dry out in a pen. Highly saturated inks are also more prone to nib creep, probably because of surfactants added to help dissolve the inks.

 

Sediment would most likely be the result of mixing inks - for example if residue of a previously used inks reacts badly with the current ink. Since highly saturated inks are harder to flush more residue may be left behind, which increases the risks of an adverse reaction between inks. However, with thorough cleaning after use there shouldn't be any problem with saturated inks.

 

If you're worried, do a Google search for the specific ink you're considering to see if others had bad experiences with that ink. Since different inks by same brand can have radically different behaviours it's best to look for experiences with the exact ink.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Hi,

 

About the Nakaya nibs, they are keyed into the grip section, so they set in the same way every time (depth and position relative to the feed is set by the shape of the sleeve that holds the nib and feed in place). I still don't pull my Nakaya nibs if I can avoid it since it is easy to damage the tail of the feed which is quite long if one is not careful. I think feed and nibs should generally be treated as an inseparable pair since they are steamed to fit.

 

Dillon

Stolen: Aurora Optima Demonstrator Red ends Medium nib. Serial number 1216 and Aurora 98 Cartridge/Converter Black bark finish (Archivi Storici) with gold cap. Reward if found. Please contact me if you have seen these pens.

Please send vial orders and other messages to fpninkvials funny-round-mark-thing gmail strange-mark-thing com. My shop is open once again if you need help with your pen.

Will someone with the name of "Jay" who emailed me through the email system provide me an email address? There was no email address provided, so I can't write back.

Dillon

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  • 2 years later...

In a couple of weeks I have my first two Nakayas arriving. Very excited. I have ordered some sample inks from Goulet's, but reading about different inks gave rise to a thought regarding whether or not there are some ins to avoid using in Nakaya pens? I've read that people have had problems with certain inks (won't mention any, but one in particular was the focus of some raucus here at FPN).

 

Has anyone ever experienced problems with certain inks in your Nakaya pens? I'm wondering if the urushi finish is more vulnerable to ink stains, or anything?

 

Before I go ahead and load up ink in my new expensive pens, I wanted to ask about it here. My apologies if this comes across as silly. I am not familiar with the use of inks beyond using MB cartidges and bottled MB ink.

 

For information I have ordered samples of the following:

 

Noodler's Baystate Blue

Sailor Kiwa-Guro Pigmented Nano Black

Sailor Sei-Boku Pigmented Nano Blue-Black

Iroshizuku Tsuki-yo (Moonlight)

Iroshizuku Yama-guri (Wild Chestnut)

Iroshizuku Take-sumi (Bamboo Charcoal)

Rohrer & Klingner Sepia

 

 

Any advice would be appreciated. Thanks!

Of that list the only one that I would avoid in anything but a cheap (or pen strictly dedicated to that ink) is is the Baystate blue. Not only is BSB extremely difficult to remove completely, if any minute amount of it left in the pen comes in contact with a different ink it can potentially ruin the feed/section, it would be fine if BSB was easy to clean, but it's not.

 

The pigmented inks since you're not going to be removing the nib/feed any time soon on a Nakaya (and shouldn't) may be one to make sure you don't let dry out and flush it once in a while (ie: maybe once every couple of months if you keep it inked).

 

Never had any problems with the Iroshizuku inks I use (Tsuki-yo and Syo-ro).

Edited by KBeezie
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I think it's okay to say Noodlers. Nathan will be the first to tell you not to put his inks in hi dollar pens. He'll to you to put his ink in his pens. The problem arises when some fill up their 800 dollar demonstrator with Bay State Concorde grape and it gets stained. Then they want to blame Nathan. I use very mild inks in my hi dollar pens

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I have used Sailor Jentle ink in my Nakaya but currently it's really loving Diamine Kensington Blue and I think that will probably stay in there for the time being.

The Good Captain

"Meddler's 'Salamander' - almost as good as the real thing!"

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Forgive my ignorance, but why are people hesitant to remove the nib and feed from their Nakaya?

Edited by sugna
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Forgive my ignorance, but why are people hesitant to remove the nib and feed from their Nakaya?

They're not designed for end users to pull in and out and since they're keyed they're set and tuned by the manufacturer before being sent out (also the older models cannot be pulled out without a special tool), it's like pulling out your montblanc nib ever other time, not something you do with those kind of pens.

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Mine likes every Diamine ink I tried; Red Dragon, Syrah, Crimson and Matador, hated Noodler's Widow Maker and loves Edelstein Turmaline. I think it likes Turmaline the most.

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