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Nos Light Green / Brown / Red / Pink Pel 400Nn


whitedot
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I paid a huge premium for this NOS 400NN brown tortoise, which has unusually bright colours. I really do not want it to crack or break like my first one. The seller was no pro, so I assume that it had been left unattended for decades.

 

Could I please have some advice as to what I should do upon receiving it?

Edited by whitedot
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have some distilled water to flush thoroughly as the first step.

don't try to ink with very saturated ink, Pel's ink is good enough to have a test drive.

btw, please share a photo of the usually bright colours of the pen. :)

a photo can show more areas of attention required than words in this forum. :)

Do not pray for easy lives, pray to be stronger men.../JFK

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Yes, I want to see the pen.

 

In that the 400NN was using the first 'good' plastic gasket(MB also @ 1955**)...you don't have to soak it like you would 'old' NOS cork.

Pelikan Royal Blue is a very safe ink.

 

Should you put partially filled pen in the back of the drawer and forget it for a generation or two....do that ONLY with Pelikan Royal Blue...it will clean out of the old pen in a jiffy. :thumbup:

 

** I read that somewhere here on the com, that the second batch of plastic gaskets from @ 1955 or later the "modern" ones, were better than the ones before.

 

If you have a NOS cork pen (which would be mid '50's and earlier), do soak it in water**...the cork is very dry...and could soak up too much of what ever ink you put in, which makes it harder to clean the pen. I made that mistake and it took 'for ever' soaking, to get the 'excess' ink out of the cork so I could change to other lighter inks.

 

**An expert could tell if one should use a glycerin water mixture for the first soaking of a antique NOS corked piston pen.

In reference to P. T. Barnum; to advise for free is foolish, ........busybodies are ill liked by both factions.

 

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 

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If you have a NOS cork pen (which would be mid '50's and earlier), do soak it in water**...the cork is very dry...and could soak up too much of what ever ink you put in, which makes it harder to clean the pen. I made that mistake and it took 'for ever' soaking, to get the 'excess' ink out of the cork so I could change to other lighter inks

 

Bo Bo

 

I believe cork seals went out in 1942 on the 100 and 100n and were never used on the 400.

 

Mark

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Just flush?

 

Should I lubricate anything before attempting to move the piston?

 

I have seen brown and honey 400NNs, mostly pale green 400NNs, and green and brown 400NNs. My heart leapt a little when I saw the seller's photos:

 

http://i.imgur.com/9pqfHtc.jpg?1

 

http://i.imgur.com/1gIRAsc.jpg?1

 

 

 

 

It reminds me of this truly extraordinary 400NN Merz and Krell in light green and pink.

 

I apologise if I had raised false hopes. If you are about to burst my bubble, please poke it gently. embarrassed_smile.gif

Edited by whitedot
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I paid a huge premium for this NOS 400NN brown tortoise, which has unusually bright colours. I really do not want it to crack or break like my first one. The seller was no pro, so I assume that it had been left unattended for decades.

 

Could I please have some advice as to what I should do upon receiving it?

 

 

 

Actually, a premium is what you might pay over and above the 'going price' for an item. If this actually is a NOS 400NN with unusually bright colors it is worth a lot of money, certainly compared to a new model M400. If it helps any, think of it this way: You just bought a very valuable pen, you may actually even have gotten a 'deal'. Yes it would be GREAT to see photos of this mafgnificent pen. Congratulations on your great new pen!

 

 

 

Awhat nib did it come woith

 

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Just flush?

 

Should I lubricate anything before attempting to move the piston?

 

I have seen brown and honey 400NNs, mostly pale green 400NNs, and green and brown 400NNs. My heart leapt a little when I saw the seller's photos:

 

http://i.imgur.com/9pqfHtc.jpg?1

 

 

 

http://i.imgur.com/1gIRAsc.jpg?1

 

 

 

 

It reminds me of this truly extraordinary 400NN Merz and Krell in light green and pink.

 

I apologise if I had raised false hopes. If you are about to burst my bubble, please poke it gently. embarrassed_smile.gif

 

There is quite a bit of variation in color and pattern in vintage tortoises unlike that in modern ones. This is most visible in between the two vintage 400's on the left and less so in the two 400NN on the right. However, the lighter colored 400NN has noticeably thinner striping than the others.

 

fpn_1365701151__img_2557.jpg

 

Two modern tortoise pens are shown for comparison. The bottom is first or second year production of the M400 (~84-85). This pen which was purchased in 1989 is unusual in that it is marked "Germany" not "W. Germany" as was M400's produced in the late 90's. The top pen (M800) is the last tortoise to be produced.

 

Should note that the tortoise color depends upon a lot on lighting. Things can look different if the pen is held up to light.

Edited by MarkTrain
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I knew a number of German pens went to a plastic during the War. I did not know when Pelikan did.

 

I have a 'no name' Pewado war pen rilled empty band.had to my 'then' surprise a plastic gasket.

The Kaweco war pen...no band, has what looks like a cork one still.

The Osmia war pen; rilled empty band...I can't tell, there was enough problems that I can't fiddle with it now and the ink window is black.

 

In that folks have other pens or could luck into NOS cork pens in the case stated for mine, which were Austrian Rusewe pens, IMO @ 1955 (because of the BP's with the problems of the time and the second generation of plastic gaskets came in @ 1955.), I suggested more care of the NOS cork than just inking it.

 

Mark Twain that is one beautiful collection of Tortoise 400's. :thumbup:

Edited by Bo Bo Olson

In reference to P. T. Barnum; to advise for free is foolish, ........busybodies are ill liked by both factions.

 

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 

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There is quite a bit of variation in color and pattern in vintage tortoises unlike that in modern ones. This is most visible in between the two vintage 400's on the left and less so in the two 400NN on the right. However, the lighter colored 400NN has noticeably thinner striping than the others.

 

fpn_1365701151__img_2557.jpg

 

Two modern tortoise pens are shown for comparison. The bottom is first or second year production of the M400 (~84-85). This pen which was purchased in 1989 is unusual in that it is marked "Germany" not "W. Germany" as was M400's produced in the late 90's. The top pen (M800) is the last tortoise to be produced.

 

Should note that the tortoise color depends upon a lot on lighting. Things can look different if the pen is held up to light.

 

Beautiful Pels. Thank you for the tender prod. Yes, I hope the seller's photos are true to life.

 

I remember reading on Rick's site that colour variations help date the pen.

 

Has anyone seen one like mine? To which year(s) does it direct us?

 

 

 

Edited by whitedot
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The bottom is first or second year production of the M400 (~84-85). This pen which was purchased in 1989 is unusual in that it is marked "Germany" not "W. Germany" as was M400's produced in the late 90's. The top pen (M800) is the last tortoise to be produced.

 

Great post mate.. Fantastic pens! And thanks for your info, I was wondering about it as well..

 

http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8546/8641152437_1be3b179cf_z.jpg

 

Has anyone seen one like mine? To which year(s) does it direct us?

 

My apologies for not being able to answer that, but I offer you my congratulations on your catch of such a fine specimen. I would just clean the old ink residue if any and enjoy it. I usually dip just the nibin the ultrasonic cleaner for a minute or two then ink straightaway. I'm more concerned of introducing pollutant into my inks, really.

 

Tony

Pie pellicane Iesu Domine, me immundum munda tuo Sanguine – St Thomas Aquinas

"ON THE PLEASURE OF TAKING UP ONE'S PEN", Hilaire Belloc

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Just flush?

 

Should I lubricate anything before attempting to move the piston?

 

I have seen brown and honey 400NNs, mostly pale green 400NNs, and green and brown 400NNs. My heart leapt a little when I saw the seller's photos:

 

http://i.imgur.com/9pqfHtc.jpg?1

 

http://i.imgur.com/1gIRAsc.jpg?1

 

 

 

 

 

 

It reminds me of this truly extraordinary 400NN Merz and Krell in light green and pink.

 

I apologise if I had raised false hopes. If you are about to burst my bubble, please poke it gently. embarrassed_smile.gif

 

when you flush it, you will be able to notice if the piston mechanism is smooth or requires some silicon grease for lubrication.

and you will be able to notice it there is any leakage due to the cork's failure or deterioration.

from the photo, the nib looks like a M or F and it is a stunning brown tortoise 400NN with brown cap and fittings. :)d

 

enjoy it with the recent limited edition of Pel's amber. :)

Edited by alvarado

Do not pray for easy lives, pray to be stronger men.../JFK

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Just flush?

 

Should I lubricate anything before attempting to move the piston?

 

I have seen brown and honey 400NNs, mostly pale green 400NNs, and green and brown 400NNs. My heart leapt a little when I saw the seller's photos:

 

http://i.imgur.com/9pqfHtc.jpg?1

 

http://i.imgur.com/1gIRAsc.jpg?1

 

 

It reminds me of this truly extraordinary 400NN Merz and Krell in light green and pink.

 

I apologise if I had raised false hopes. If you are about to burst my bubble, please poke it gently. embarrassed_smile.gif

 

From the photos that you have shown, that was indeed Pelikan 400NN Merz &Krel edition. I had previously posted this pen here >> https://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/index.php?/topic/237712-pelikan-400nn/page__p__2566958__hl__krel__fromsearch__1#entry2566958

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My train of thought stopped at: "Oooooh, pretty. This looks similar to the Merz and Krell." I never thought to check whether it was, in fact, a Merz and Krell.

 

The barrel is flush with the piston knob.

 

The nib is marked M, and the imprint is different.

 

Well, this is embarassing. I have inadvertently acquired a grail pen - at a bit of a discount.

 

Thanks, daenghafez!

 

(:bunny01: )

 

Edit:

 

It just hit me. I would be inking a mint and elusive pen. This is uncharted territory.

Edited by whitedot
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Ink it with gentle soft Pelikan Royal Blue, which beats hanging the pen on the wall, where only one person will admire it because it's hanging over the single malt.

 

You have caused a reorganization of my wish list.

 

I am very interested in how a 'late '70's' nib is, regular flex...(vintage :thumbup:) or :cloud9: semi-flex.

If the former...did M&K make a semi-flex nib?

Edited by Bo Bo Olson

In reference to P. T. Barnum; to advise for free is foolish, ........busybodies are ill liked by both factions.

 

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 

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I have got mine a year ago and it is not NOS :headsmack:

However, the nib is OB in which I cherish a lot :roflmho: post-77444-0-65650800-1365768676.jpg

Edited by alvarado

Do not pray for easy lives, pray to be stronger men.../JFK

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The seller's blurry photo of the back-end. No step from the barrel to the knob.

 

http://i.imgur.com/MRlJxPg.jpg?1

 

 

 

Ink it with gentle soft Pelikan Royal Blue, which beats hanging the pen on the wall, where only one person will admire it because it's hanging over the single malt.

 

You have caused a reorganization of my wish list.

 

I am very interested in how a 'late '70's' nib is, regular flex...(vintage :thumbup:) or :cloud9: semi-flex.

If the former...did M&K make a semi-flex nib?

 

Bo Bo Olson, I have a bottle of Pelikan Royal Blue ready. thumbup.gif

 

Have I really? What's your wish list now? Do share.

 

I will let you know about the flex once it has arrived.

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I need more Tortoise pens.

There are a few here with very :cloud9: collections of tortoise pens....some folks also got '30's to go with '50's, '90's and modern.

 

I only have a '90's M400 and a(the Boehler brothers split Osmia-1938, so the Boehler pens ended up with the same size and model numbers.) '38-40 Boehler Gold mdl 54; tortoise.

It may be seldom, but others at least in Germany did also make tortoise pens.

In reference to P. T. Barnum; to advise for free is foolish, ........busybodies are ill liked by both factions.

 

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 

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I'd never thought Tortoise would be a thing I'd enjoy...

Thanks guys, I need to save my pennies again...

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