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What Is The Difference Between The Pelikan M200, M205, M400, M600, M800, M1000?


brian15co
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However; no two nibs are the same, if you can; try different nibs or buy from one of the 'Richard Binder' style nib specialists to be sure it writes right. They should always write wet and smooth, because that are the characteristics Pelikan is known for.

 

This.

 

In order to avoid guesswork and subsequent anguish and perpetuation of misinformation, noobs should get their pen from proper people.. And like joker4eva said above, Tradition and Souveran series are different, and YGWYPF. Generalizing a whole brand from their affordable low end model is just not on, I reckon.

Pie pellicane Iesu Domine, me immundum munda tuo Sanguine – St Thomas Aquinas

"ON THE PLEASURE OF TAKING UP ONE'S PEN", Hilaire Belloc

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Original poster try this site: http://www.pelikanpens.co.uk/

It's organized to show the different classes, models, etc. This is also the dealer that I bought my M200 from. Sadly, the pen and I did not work out at all. Nor did I find any happiness with its predecessor the M100. Both felt cheap to me and at $100 minimum, the M200 should not, imho, feel cheap.

 

I also take issue with a previous poster's statement that the M200 and its class have pistons that feel as substantial as the higher numbered Pelikans. Not having tried an M1000, and only based upon reviews, I'd say that the M200 has a long way to go to even approximate the M1000, or M800, or even the M600. Those are all Souverans.

 

Anyway, I sent my M200 back...to the U.K. no less. In addition to being light-weight and cheapy-feeling, it skipped and hard started all the time. I am thoroughly unimpressed with Pelikans after my two experiences with their low end pens. In fact, as a result of these experiences, I don't even look at Pelikans any more. Scratched them right off my "Possibles List" for future purchases.

 

Obviously I may be off base here somewhere but that's my experience Kemo Sabe.

 

 

Undoubtedly I think the M200 series should be a bit better, but I find them pretty darn good pens already. Its terrible you had this experience. The Pelikan high end offerings are a real treat however, and I insist you try them.

 

@Saintpaulia

I also think that the M200 is a quite good pen.

Sorry to hear that yours did not work as expected (such problems can happen from my experience in rare cases with all manufacturers, but checking/correcting the tines alignment and/or polish the iridium corn will fix most hard start/skip problems in a jiffy)

It's always difficult to like a pen when it's not writing correctly.

Best to give such pens back and get a replacement (but if you do not like it at all there is probably only the give back option)

 

I own (beside some vintage Pelikan pens) a M200 Demonstrator, a M215 and two M600

 

In general the Pelikan pens are very light weighted (Souveräns up to the M600), especially the M200 (which I like).

When I compare the 200 with the 600 it feels of course not that high graded, but from my viewpoint they are still high quality and well constructed.

The M215 is a little bit heavier and feels for me a bit more valuable than the 200.

But when I compare for example the TWSBI 540 and TWSBI Mini with the 200 for me the 200 feels more high graded.

The TWSBI's are also excellent pens in my opinion.

The Mini is for me closer than the 540 on the level of the 200 (very close).

 

But this is a very personal judgement.

Edited by Pterodactylus
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However; no two nibs are the same, if you can; try different nibs or buy from one of the 'Richard Binder' style nib specialists to be sure it writes right. They should always write wet and smooth, because that are the characteristics Pelikan is known for.

 

This.

 

In order to avoid guesswork and subsequent anguish and perpetuation of misinformation, noobs should get their pen from proper people.. And like joker4eva said above, Tradition and Souveran series are different, and YGWYPF. Generalizing a whole brand from their affordable low end model is just not on, I reckon.

 

I don't think much of the often read recommendation: buy a pen only at this or that nib meister .....

Such pens are articles of daily use, nothing special.

They has to be working well out of the box like any other thing you buy, otherwise they are faulty and go back, a simple warranty issue.

 

And most of the times they are working as expected.

The rare cases where people have issues are only getting much more publicity.

Almost nobody will post: Oh, I bought a new pen and its surprisingly working out of the box, I'm so happy

Most likely you will write a post when you are not satisfied.

No company can survive when delivering products with a fault rate greater then a few per mill.

 

People which are new to fountain pens must get the impression that when buying a pen they are by default faulty and has to be magical tuned, which can only be done by a handful persons.

This is simply not the case.

 

The default case when buying a new pen (speaking of high quality pens) is that they are working out of the box.

If you are not satisfied you have always the possibility to give it back or get a replacement, and this should never be an issue when buying from a good seller (and there are many of them).

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Is TWSBI not just a Chinese replica of a Pelikan? To me it seems like that. Nevertheless TWSBI's can be good pens, lets not argue that, but they seem to have been, hmm let's say, 'inspired' by pelikan pens....

In that case I always choose the original.

"Le vase donne une forme au vide, et la musique au silence"

Georges Braque

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Hi

 

I have a M200, a M205, a M400 and 2 M600. I find the M600 excellent and the M200 was disappointing. The funny thing is that both the M200 and the M205 have fine Pelikan steel nibs and the M205 is excellent and the M200 not. The M200 is older and I think that I heard that they changed their place of nib manufacture.

 

What is certain, Pelikan are great pens

 

Chaim

Chaim Seymour

David Elazar 8

Givat Shemuel

Israel

54032

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Personally, I don't feel the need to buy from a nibmeister, but then again I prefer to tune a new nib myself.. good or bad, I adjust my expectations with my skill level accordingly.

 

But others might need help to meet their 'great expectations', and swapping pens/nibs over and over across the world is just less economical than a simple nibmeister tune job. Especially if you're in the US! The price difference of M200 between Binder and niche pens is a whopping $3 inc. shipping. :doh:

Pie pellicane Iesu Domine, me immundum munda tuo Sanguine – St Thomas Aquinas

"ON THE PLEASURE OF TAKING UP ONE'S PEN", Hilaire Belloc

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http://imageshack.us/a/img692/5412/4gxz.jpg

 

http://imageshack.us/a/img17/602/5von.jpg

 

Just to mention explicitely there was no need to regrind the M200-M and M215-B nib.

They were fine out of the box.

It was a a personal motivation to do it, as I like to tweak my pens (and make it hopefully even better ;-) )

Edited by Pterodactylus
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Is TWSBI not just a Chinese replica of a Pelikan? To me it seems like that. Nevertheless TWSBI's can be good pens, lets not argue that, but they seem to have been, hmm let's say, 'inspired' by pelikan pens....

In that case I always choose the original.

I don't see a resemblance between TWSBI's and Pelikans at all, and cannot really see how you got to that conclusion.

 

Not even inspired in the superficial sense of general design (despite looking "pen-like" on those generic points of having a nib, cap, barrel and a flat-top design). The only similar factor is the differential piston filling mechanism which everyone copied off Pelikan some time before WW2.

 

Perhaps there's some other subtle similarity that can only be discovered when one has a TWSBI in hand? (but since I have no desire to own one I suppose I'll never find out)

 

I do recall seeing a picture of a pen (I think it was of mainland Chinese manufacture), that was a total rip off of the Pelikan 400nn series. Kinda like the Geha's that did the same - black end caps and striated barrel and everything. That was in the 50's/60's though I think.

 

Probably the closest to "fakes" Pelikan's ever had, I suppose.

 

-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-

 

Also, lest sensitivities be harmed I'll just point out to you that TWSBI's are of Taiwanese manufacture; the folk of that island would have a thing or two to say if they were confused with others ;)

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Indeed no resemblance at all between a TWSBI and a Pelikan. The common denominator, apparently, in the poster's mind, was that they are both piston fillers?

 

I don't mean to hijack this thread, but...I am really still trying to figure out 'what is what' with Pelikans. Since I have very limited funds for pen collecting, I first bought an M100, the white one with the black nib. Very cool looking. Thought that I'd see what all the fuss was about with Pelikans by starting with their "starter" pen. This was a NOS pen complete with case. From Portugal.

 

This M100 was terrible. Piston moved very sluggishly and I felt that I had to be careful or I'd break it. (I probably wouldn't have but...one never knows with a new pen and a new brand). The nib was scratchy and dragged across the paper. It was WORK to write with it. This pen cost me about $75.00 (US). So I sold it and thought, "Well I guess one has to spend a bit more to get into the "true" Pelikans that so much good is said of".

 

So I started reading up on the M200 in reviews of same, and began shopping for the best deal. Finally found one for $100 from a store in the U.K. This pen also was new, in box, papers, everything. I reverentially removed it from its case and lovingly stroked its beautiful...no wait a minute, this is a pen not a chick!

 

I took photos of it as each successive thing was opened: mailer, inner box, case, the works (see attachments). I was fully prepared to really love this pen, OK? Then when I finally got to the pen itself and held it, it seemed awfully light, you know? It weighed about 12.5 grams. My funky Sheaffer Student pen weighs 11.1 grams. It was closest to the Pilot 78G which is 12. 72 gams. But somehow that weight feels okay on the 78G but on the Pelikan it just felt "cheap".

 

Then I duly flushed it to remove any residue from manufacturing. Dried it thoroughly and then filled it with my most conservative ink, Waterman's Florida Blue. By near universal consent this ink is a good ink and if you have problems it's the pen. I had problems. The pen would write pretty well though with some hard starts thru about 150-200 words and then begin to skip. After a few more lines it just petered out. Wouldn't write at all.

 

I have never had a pen that wouldn't write at all. And for $100 a pen ought to not only not write, but write VERY well. I wrote to the dealer and told him my problems. He wanted to send me a new nib/feed assembly that he had personally tried. Excellent care and service after the sale. No question. But by then, you know, I just simply did not feel that this pen was worth sinking my $100 into. I thought of all the pens that I'd like to have that $100 would buy and then some. Not the kind of thoughts one should be having over a Pelikan, wouldn't you say? I told the dealer thanks very much, but I'd like to send it back. Which I did. This was on the 15th of this month. I am waiting to hear that it got there safe and sound.

 

So, yeah, I am not in the mood (yet) to start looking at M400s!

post-87732-0-91386200-1361840226.jpg

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post-87732-0-22405000-1361840246.jpg

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post-87732-0-64203400-1361840263.jpg

post-87732-0-33732300-1361840273.jpg

post-87732-0-10556000-1361840282.jpg

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I also think the price for the M200 is a bit high, especially compared to the Lamy's.

That said, it should write very well. In my experience though, there's a lot of difference between the nibs, a lot of nibs don't write well out of the box.

Some do. In fact, to have this pen write well, you have to try one in a actual shop yourself, or send it to a nib technician. It shouldn't be so, but that's my experience.

"Le vase donne une forme au vide, et la musique au silence"

Georges Braque

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Is TWSBI not just a Chinese replica of a Pelikan? To me it seems like that. Nevertheless TWSBI's can be good pens, lets not argue that, but they seem to have been, hmm let's say, 'inspired' by pelikan pens....

In that case I always choose the original.

I don't see a resemblance between TWSBI's and Pelikans at all, and cannot really see how you got to that conclusion.

 

Not even inspired in the superficial sense of general design (despite looking "pen-like" on those generic points of having a nib, cap, barrel and a flat-top design). The only similar factor is the differential piston filling mechanism which everyone copied off Pelikan some time before WW2.

 

Perhaps there's some other subtle similarity that can only be discovered when one has a TWSBI in hand? (but since I have no desire to own one I suppose I'll never find out)

 

I do recall seeing a picture of a pen (I think it was of mainland Chinese manufacture), that was a total rip off of the Pelikan 400nn series. Kinda like the Geha's that did the same - black end caps and striated barrel and everything. That was in the 50's/60's though I think.

 

Probably the closest to "fakes" Pelikan's ever had, I suppose.

 

-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-

 

Also, lest sensitivities be harmed I'll just point out to you that TWSBI's are of Taiwanese manufacture; the folk of that island would have a thing or two to say if they were confused with others ;)

 

I totally agree what you said.

 

Just wanted to add that I personally think that TWSBI is making a very good job and providing great pens.

Their pens getting better and better with every new model.

I think the TWSBI Mini is a possible alternative if somebody does not like the M200.

You are getting great value for your money.

I think beside the M200 the TWSBI MINI is currently "THE ENTRY PEN" into the world of piston fillers.

The nibs are German quality nibs, previously from Schmidt, then Bock and currently Jowo, the pens can be completely disassembled and comes already with a wrench (to allow disassembly) and silicon grease for maintenance.

This is top notch, I don't know any other manufacturer which is that good regarding maintainability of their pens.

Try to disassamble a M200 and you know what I mean (you get the impression you have a disposable pen when trying to disassemble the piston, which was never intended to be disassembled in his lifetime)

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I own one of each size and for me the M800-M1000 size is most comfortable to write with. I think they are all high quality but there is a difference starting at the M800 level with the brass internals which does add weight, yielding a more substantial feel. There M1000 nib as previously mentioned is different from all the other gold nibs in its "springiness" and I love the feel of it. Pelikans are great pens, that do write a generous line (so take that into consideration when choosing a nib size).

I would echo the advice to go to a store where you can actually handle some of these pens. There is no substitute for actually feeling the differences yourself. Please keep in mind though that they won't ink them for you as they are not new after being inked and can't be sold as new!

 

I have the M400 white tortoise, M600 Blue, Red and Blue M800s and a Black M1000. The 400 (F) is beautiful and lovely to use, but feels insubstantial compared to the Souverans. I like my 600 (M), love both 800s (M & B italic), and despite the wisdom of the advice 'try before you buy', couldn't get my hands on one so I bought the 1000 (OBB) on 'trust', knowing the size is similar to my Duofold Centennials, which are perfectly comfortable even though I have 'small' hands for a guy (glove size 7.) Its nib is indeed springy, smooth as you could wish, and puts down a wet, generous, variable line. You see many comments about its weight, and at 33gm it is heavier than many, but it's nothing terrible... on the contrary, it feels good, encouraging me to go hunting for something to write... grocery shopping list, anything at all. I don't post caps because I find they have, for me, an adverse effect on the balance of my pens, so arguably that reduces the effects of weight and length that do influence those who prefer to post.

'

Ultimately, it's down to personal taste, but I sure as heck am not returning mine to the shop.

 

Regards,

Glenn.

Edited by Eccles
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M-M-M-L-XL-2XL :ltcapd:

 

Guess you could sum it up that way! :ltcapd:

But you forgotten: starting from the second medium, they're all gold mediums... :bunny01:

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Before derailment, this was what-is-the-difference-between-the-pelikan-m200-m205-m400-m600-m800-m1000 thread.

 

The size.

 

http://justdaveyb.files.wordpress.com/2013/02/pelicanbgstriated_20130213_tn.jpg

 

M1000 to M300 :)

 

http://justdaveyb.files.wordpress.com/2013/01/pelnibs_20130116_tn.jpg

 

NIbs: M250 (=M400), M600,M800, M1000, M300

Edited by justdaveyb
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M-M-M-L-XL-2XL :ltcapd:

No idea what is meant.

 

 

I should explain. The letters refer to sizing commonly found in clothing for example. Therefore;

 

 

M= Medium sized pens = M200/205/400

 

L= Large sized pens = M600

 

XL=...

 

 

S = Small = M300

Edited by J-F-O
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