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What Is The Difference Between The Pelikan M200, M205, M400, M600, M800, M1000?


brian15co
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I have been looking to get a nice pen (probably more than one!), and I keep seeing good things about the Pelikans. They consistently show up on must-have lists. I was wondering if you guys could help clear up the real differences between the different pens.

 

I have tried to look around the forums, but I haven't found a clear answer. I am very new to all this, but I have listed a few assumptions and am wondering if they hold true as the pen model numbers go up (ie, M200 --> M1000)

 

  • Are the construction materials any better?
  • Will the pen write better?
  • Will the pen otherwise perform better?
  • Can it be expected to last longer?

 

The quick Google prices (Feb 2013) are below to give everyone an idea of price difference (US dollars)

 

  • M100 -- ~90 (discontinued??)
  • M150 -- ~90
  • M200 -- 110
  • M205 -- 135
  • M215 -- 135 (steel nibs ^)
  • M400 -- 292 (gold nibs v)
  • M405 -- 300
  • M600 -- 325
  • M800 -- 475
  • M1000- 580

 

I understand that I'm a newbie and may be missing something big, but I am considering getting an M205 to begin. Wondering If I should save up for a better pen

 

*EDIT I have added some other pen models I was not aware of. The prices are pretty approximate, I just used Google and reported the average of the first things that came up

Edited by brian15co
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The M200, M205, and M400 are all pretty much the same size. The M200 has gold plated "furniture" and the M205 has silver. I sold my M205 Blue Marble to save up for an M600. It's been two years now and I still don't have my M600. I wish now I hadn't sold the M205. It came from Richard Binder and was reground to a cursive italic. It was a great pen. I miss it.

 

 

From what I have read the M800 and M1000 have brass piston mechanisms. The others are plastic. But that makes the m800 and m1000 heavier that the other pens. I would try them out in person if possible before buying the m800 or the m1000. They may be too big or too heavy for you. I still have my heart set on an M600. Trying to save up for it again and carry through on that purchase.

He came down from heaven and was made man.

 

fpn_1305512260__inkdroplogofpn.jpg member since May 15th, 2011

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I have been looking to get a nice pen (probably more than one!), and I keep seeing good things about the Pelikans. They consistently show up on must-have lists. I was wondering if you guys could help clear up the real differences between the different pens.

 

I have tried to look around the forums, but I haven't found a clear answer. I am very new to all this, but I have listed a few assumptions and am wondering if they hold true as the pen model numbers go up (ie, M200 --> M1000)

 

  • Are the construction materials any better?
  • Will the pen write better?
  • Will the pen otherwise perform better?
  • Can it be expected to last longer?

 

The quick google prices (Feb 2013) are below to give everyone an idea of price difference (US dollars)

 

  • M200 -- 110
  • M205 -- 138 (steel nibs ^)
  • M400 -- 292 (gold nibs v)
  • M600 -- 325
  • M800 -- 475
  • M1000- 580

 

I understand that I'm a newbie and may be missing something big, but I am considering getting an M205 to begin. Wondering If I should save up for a better pen

 

In general I can say all Pelikan pens are high quality pens and well constructed.

If you treat them well they will last your whole lifetime (and longer)

In general you can also say the higher the first digit of the M number the bigger the pen.

They all write good, gold and steel nibs.

It depends on your personal preference, each pen has a different character.

I would recommend that you go to a shop and try the different pens by yourself.

 

Maybe you take also a looks at the M215, I like their design and the steel nib is very good.

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The obvious difference is the size; the M2XX being small-medium, a very good 'standard' sized pen. The M800-1000 really are a lot larger, especially the M1000.

As said, the 800 & 1000 have brass piston mechanisms, and you can very well feel the weight of that in your hand.

What quality is concerned; all of these pens last a lifetime if taken proper care for; proper care means flushing with clean water at least once a year. It prevents the ink from drying inside the pen, with dried ink inside the piston won't move anymore. The M200 is just as sturdy as the expensive pens, but less fancy finished, less bling-bling.

And the nibs of course; steel vs gold. Much has been already said about that, my experience is that the golden nibs are smoother, glide more easily over the paper, but also have less 'feedback' than the steel ones. Some might call the golden nibs a bit numb or bland. But again, that is up to very personal preference.

The M1000 nib is very different; is feels very soft/springy for which it is much loved by pen aficionados. It's also more than 3 times the size of a M200 nib.

(for sizes; look at the richardspens website, you can see the pens that you select side by side; very handy).

 

You just have to feel these pens in your hand in a shop. If that's not possible, it's more or less a gamble what size you will like.

Writing a smaller pen is fine by me, so the safest way to go for a fountain pen novice is the M2XX.

It's a pen that is much praised, and rightly so.

However; no two nibs are the same, if you can; try different nibs or buy from one of the 'Richard Binder' style nib specialists to be sure it writes right.

They should always write wet and smooth, because that are the characteristics Pelikan is known for.

Edited by Nibwitz

"Le vase donne une forme au vide, et la musique au silence"

Georges Braque

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The previous members pretty well laid out the differences in terms of finishes and construction.

 

I suggest you look at the pens you have and decide which ones are the most comfortable, size-wise, in your hand. Then look at a site like richardspens.com to compare the various Pelikans to what you like to write with.

 

For me, the 200 and 400 are too small but many people swear by them and use them as daily writers. I find the M600 to be a comfortable pen, lightweight and easy to write with. The m800, however, for me is a better size (I do not post my pens) both for width and length. The only drawback is they are a little heavier due to the brass piston and they are a little back-weighted as a result. I have never tried the M1000 but it looks really large.

 

Good luck, hope this helps!

Not all those who wander are lost. J.R.R.Tolkien

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The M1000 Souveran is big and heavy. It settles into the web of the hand, becoming part of the

hand. Ink flow is excellent. Writing is nearly effortless. It is, however, big and expensive.

 

My M600 is a "normal" size pen, like the Esterbrook J and the Parker 51. The others are smaller

and well suited for pocket carry. The M215 feels heavier than the others of similar size. Like

its owner, it is handsomely conservative, and performes wonderfully.

 

Gotta go, now. The wife was reading over my shoulder, and is now collapsed on the floor,

laughing. (There is something to be said in favore of a "man cave".)

Edited by Sasha Royale

Auf freiem Grund mit freiem Volke stehn.
Zum Augenblicke dürft ich sagen:
Verweile doch, du bist so schön !

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The M200 has gold plated "furniture" and the M205 has silver.

 

Do you mean the plating on the M205 is silver like sterling silver, or just silver colored like stainless steel or something?

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Maybe you take also a looks at the M215, I like their design and the steel nib is very good.

 

I didn't even know that one existed, I'll edit my post to include it. Thanks :thumbup:

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As many have already mentioned, the difference is mainly in their sizes.

 

The M200 and M150 pens are part of their Classic series, and are cheaper. However, that doesn't say anything about the quality of those pens. I haven't had a Pelikan Souverän to compare with, but they are real workhorses for those who wants a nice fountain pen, without spending a lot of money, and are willing to settle for a steel nib.

The M400, M600, M800 and M1000 (not too sure about this) are part of Pelikan's Souverän class, which sport gold nibs. The difference between these pens are their sizes. Their size increases with their number, hence making a M400 smaller than a M600, and the same applies to the M800 and M1000. Besides that, as aforementioned, the M800 and M1000 sport brass piston mechanisms.

The 5 in place of the last 0 for all these pens usually indicate silver furnishings instead of the usual gold. Besides that, the 5 might also indicate a different color scheme, for example, the M405 has a black body, instead of a striated green body. It might also have blue or even red bodies. I haven't paid enough attention to those details.

 

I'm no expert in these things, so please correct me if I've typed something wrong. I just wrote this with what came up in my head while I was typing.

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I suggest you look at the pens you have and decide which ones are the most comfortable, size-wise, in your hand.

 

I think part of the awesomeness of this hobby is the seemingly endless variety of different "feels" out there. I can't really think of one kind of food that I don't like, and that more-or-less universal acceptance will probably translate into this stuff.

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there is a construction difference between m200 and m400, as noted above. Also between m600 and m800: the latter has a brass piston and the user can take it apart. But otherwise the quality is the same from 400-1000. As has been remarked on another thread I read today (sorry, forget which), as you get more accustomed to using fountain pens, you enjoy wider pens.

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The M200 has gold plated "furniture" and the M205 has silver.

 

Do you mean the plating on the M205 is silver like sterling silver, or just silver colored like stainless steel or something?

 

It's high gloss polished stainless steel.

 

I like the silver colored nibs of the 205/215 more than the gold colored 200 nib.

For me look the gold colored nibs not like real gold, so I prefer the 205/215 silver colored nib.

I have also the impression that the 205/215 nibs are a little bit more springy than the 200 nib (which I prefer).

 

I think that the gold nibs are per default smoother than steel nibs is a myth.

You write in both cases with a iridium alloy corn which is soldered either on steel or gold.

So neither gold nor steel touches the paper when writing.

You can polish this iridium corn on both, steel and gold nibs as smooth as you like.

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there is a construction difference between m200 and m400, as noted above. Also between m600 and m800: the latter has a brass piston and the user can take it apart. But otherwise the quality is the same from 400-1000. As has been remarked on another thread I read today (sorry, forget which), as you get more accustomed to using fountain pens, you enjoy wider pens.

 

I think the preferred size is a very personal individual thing independent from the experience.

My favorite pens are the smaller ones, even I have not small hands and use my pens always unposted.

I write also with bigger pens, but have often the feeling that they are heavy handed.

 

E.g. my biggest pen is a Jinhao 159 (size of a MB 149) which feels much to heavy, bulky and big for me to write longer with it.

On the other side one of my all time favorite pen is a very small Mont Blanc 342 from the 50s.

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I own one of each size and for me the M800-M1000 size is most comfortable to write with. I think they are all high quality but there is a difference starting at the M800 level with the brass internals which does add weight, yielding a more substantial feel. There M1000 nib as previously mentioned is different from all the other gold nibs in its "springiness" and I love the feel of it. Pelikans are great pens, that do write a generous line (so take that into consideration when choosing a nib size).

I would echo the advice to go to a store where you can actually handle some of these pens. There is no substitute for actually feeling the differences yourself. Please keep in mind though that they won't ink them for you as they are not new after being inked and can't be sold as new!

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Original poster try this site: http://www.pelikanpens.co.uk/

It's organized to show the different classes, models, etc. This is also the dealer that I bought my M200 from. Sadly, the pen and I did not work out at all. Nor did I find any happiness with its predecessor the M100. Both felt cheap to me and at $100 minimum, the M200 should not, imho, feel cheap.

 

I also take issue with a previous poster's statement that the M200 and its class have pistons that feel as substantial as the higher numbered Pelikans. Not having tried an M1000, and only based upon reviews, I'd say that the M200 has a long way to go to even approximate the M1000, or M800, or even the M600. Those are all Souverans.

 

Anyway, I sent my M200 back...to the U.K. no less. In addition to being light-weight and cheapy-feeling, it skipped and hard started all the time. I am thoroughly unimpressed with Pelikans after my two experiences with their low end pens. In fact, as a result of these experiences, I don't even look at Pelikans any more. Scratched them right off my "Possibles List" for future purchases.

 

Obviously I may be off base here somewhere but that's my experience Kemo Sabe.

Edited by Saintpaulia
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I agree with the above statements. Pelikan has made good solid pens for many years. Here are a few links to help: size, nibs, more info. If you look around on these sites, you will all sorts of information on Pelikans. One more place to look is The PENguin. Good luck.

"One can not waste time worrying about small minds . . . If we were normal, we'd still be using free ball point pens." —Bo Bo Olson

 

"I already own more ink than a rational person can use in a lifetime." —Waski_the_Squirrel

 

I'm still trying to figure out how to list all my pens down here.

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Original poster try this site: http://www.pelikanpens.co.uk/

It's organized to show the different classes, models, etc. This is also the dealer that I bought my M200 from. Sadly, the pen and I did not work out at all. Nor did I find any happiness with its predecessor the M100. Both felt cheap to me and at $100 minimum, the M200 should not, imho, feel cheap.

 

I also take issue with a previous poster's statement that the M200 and its class have pistons that feel as substantial as the higher numbered Pelikans. Not having tried an M1000, and only based upon reviews, I'd say that the M200 has a long way to go to even approximate the M1000, or M800, or even the M600. Those are all Souverans.

 

Anyway, I sent my M200 back...to the U.K. no less. In addition to being light-weight and cheapy-feeling, it skipped and hard started all the time. I am thoroughly unimpressed with Pelikans after my two experiences with their low end pens. In fact, as a result of these experiences, I don't even look at Pelikans any more. Scratched them right off my "Possibles List" for future purchases.

 

Obviously I may be off base here somewhere but that's my experience Kemo Sabe.

 

 

Undoubtedly I think the M200 series should be a bit better, but I find them pretty darn good pens already. Its terrible you had this experience. The Pelikan high end offerings are a real treat however, and I insist you try them.

The little things really count.

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Undoubtedly I think the M200 series should be a bit better, but I find them pretty darn good pens already. Its terrible you had this experience. The Pelikan high end offerings are a real treat however, and I insist you try them.

If you insist. Please remit $500 to.... just kidding. Buyer's remorse has not yet run its course. I was really, really prepared to love my M200, and when I realized it wasn't what I had thought, I was pretty depressed.

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