Jump to content
Classifieds is broken, please do not submit any new ads ×

Who Do You Write To?



Enoch_Root

Recommended Posts

Sailor Kenshin

I wish I could write to my mom and dad, but sadly, they are gone.

 

Why would you let a silly thing like death stop you? I still write to my mother and father in Other Side Camp. Just cause the Postal Service can't deliver there, that don't mean the message ain't received.

 

I used to be a big letter writer and sort of lost it with The Internet and going back to school. I'm starting a campaign to write to everyone whom I've ever met who has touched me in some way, whether I have their address or not. I traveled alone to see my father when I was 12 or 13, and there was a flight attendant who made me feel safe by constantly checking up on me, and even sitting with me and showing me pictures of her new baby. That was 30 years ago, but what she taught me about kindness still resonates in me. I couldn't possibly find her now, but I'm writing to her nonetheless.

 

You could call this a mere journal entry, but it's not. Writing to someone is quite different from writing about someone, whether it's mailed to yourself and just saved, unopened, or whether you send it to Other Side Camp through the fire, it's different.

 

A lot of letters that I write end up starting with some variation of "You may not remember this, but there was this one time when you…" and then I go on to tell them something they did or said that has affected me. It gives me a chance to think about it and processes it, and I hope it's nice for them to have a letter from someone saying "Hey, something you did was really meaningful to me."

 

(By the way, I thought it would be interesting to mail the letters that I can't really send– like to the flight attendant– to my house, care of my children. They can open them later if they want)

 

I think you just sparked an idea. Thanks.

 

I do have some FPN pals and others. My family doesn't respond to letters, just emails. Sometimes.

 

When I was a kid and we moved some 30, 40 miles away, I wrote to all my school friends.

My other pen is a Montblanc and...

 

My other blog is a tumblr.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 76
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • Vendome

    8

  • Epistler

    6

  • Redonna

    4

  • GabrielleDuVent

    3

LionofdiSouth

 

 

http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b121/trimster/PenInHand_zps157c5a27.jpg

 

There is something rather magical about getting a hand written note, on real paper, these days. There's also something magical about penning that note.

 

Bob

 

What type of paper is that your using?

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I wish I could write to my mom and dad, but sadly, they are gone.

 

Why would you let a silly thing like death stop you? I still write to my mother and father in Other Side Camp. Just cause the Postal Service can't deliver there, that don't mean the message ain't received.

 

Glad to know that I am not the only one who writes to those in the "Other Side Camp" (love the name, incidentally!) I still write to my Grandma and Mom.

 

 

I also have several penpals on "this side."

 

I initially started penpalling over 20 years ago, when I was in high school in Japan, learning English. It seemed like a good way to learn the language "in action" rather than keep dissecting the dead specimen in classroom... necessary, I know, but BORING! My first pals were the girls of my age in Europe- one from Italy, the other from Germany. It was so cool to learn about other cultures, even regarding mundane things like how they got to school (walk? take a train? bus? bike? I told them about the crazy-packed commuter train in Tokyo, complete with pics, and they got such a big kick out of it. Yes, it was the AGES before youtube/ other internet resources,) their most/ least favorite subjects, school gossips, whatever. Fascinating!!! It was so cool to see how different, yet similar, we all are. Their letters got me to get my very first fountain pen as well.

 

Ever since then, I have always had penpals. Unfortunately the friendship didn't last with the first pals, but there are some penpals that I have been corresponding for awhile (one since 1995, the other since 1997.)

 

I also write to some "real life" friends. One of my best friends from HS days is a great correspondent, so we keep in touch via letters. Some of my penpals became my "real life" friends over the course of years/ several personal meetings. Some of them are my facebook friends as well (cheapest way to share the pics! Also- I can send them a quick message saying "I sent you a letter- let me know when you get it.")

 

I do use e-mail/ facebook/ all that as well, but- personally, receiving the e-mails can never get nearly as exciting as receiving "snail mail." It is just such an exciting feeling, to open my mailbox and find a letter in there... often with cool postage stamps... ahhhh!!!!! :cloud9:

Link to post
Share on other sites
quantumcloud509

I live in Washington State. I write to:

 

My 13 year old cousin in Jacksonville, FL

My old best friend in Charlotte, NC

My grandfather in Minsk, Belarus

My other old best friend in the Washington State Prison in Walla Walla

Sometime forum members from other forums

 

I bought resume paper from Fred Meyers to write on. I also have lots of postcards and antique photographs from yard sales and thrift stores which I write on.

I dont have Facebook and I rarely use my phone.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I write to family overseas uncles cousins etc , Even tho we Skype .

 

I love writing letters :-) , If anyone wants to exchange letters private message me .

 

Other then that not much as i would like too :(

http://img525.imageshack.us/img525/606/letterji9.png <-- Just private message me
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

This thread caused me to pause and take note.

The following is a summary of my outgoing correspondences from the past two months. I hope that the descriptions of recipients and of content will inspire people to write some letters, notes, and cards of their own!

 

* To a friend who has Getting Things Done issues, an relevant insight that I once read

* To a friend with whom I watched the Up Series films several years ago, an alert that the next installment in the series has been produced

* To an old friend whom I rarely see these days, explaining an assignment at my job and asking if he could lend his expertise

* To a lifelong friend whom I see only a few times a year I pointed out a film that I think would interest him; I also updated him on activities in my new job

* To a friend and regular correspondent whom I see fairly often, a haiku on a postcard, spontaneously composed about my cat. This friend and I go through periods of regular correspondence even when we see each other face-to-face.

* To my sister-in-law, a note about my recent beginnings in a hobby which she has expressed interest in taking up; a photo of me thus engaged enclosed

* To my niece, thanking her for some help; reporting that I had noticed while out and about a behavior in others which I had talked about with her; and telling her that I had finally visited a museum which she used to frequent, letting her know that being there made me think of her

* To the Getting Things Done friend mentioned above, an explanatory note with a few copies of a novel day planner format that I'd stumbled upon

* To a very busy friend, another note with copies of that planner format

* To a friend who had emailed me with an invitation to an even that is a couple of months off and a mention that she'd run into a friend we have in common, an acceptance of that emailed invitation, a few words of appreciation about the third party, and some words of encouragement and inquiry about her first weeks in graduate school

* To an acquaintance who has posted on Facebook a commentary about an experience she had, an anecdote about a similar experience in my past

* To a different niece, encouraging her interest in fountain pens—which I'd only recently learned of

* To the busy friend mentioned above, thanking her for introducing me fifteen years ago to chai masala, a drink which came to mind recently after a long break

* To a friend in the midst of chemotherapy, a cheering note with some photos of her children from a few years ago

* To a childhood friend to whose mother I had sent a gift some months earlier, asking if he though she had received it and if it arrived in workable condition (it is unlike her to not acknowledge a gift, and I was reluctant to ask her about it directly)

* To an old friend who no longer lives nearby, a letter to enclose with a book that I was sending to her, explaining why I chose it for her (or her for it!) and urging her to read it

* A second, briefer note regarding the book gift just mentioned, written because I had misplaced the original (I ended up enclosing both with the book!)

* A thank-you note for a belated Christmas present

* A 2nd thank-you for a second belated present

* To a childhood friend, a note suggesting that he look into a book whose author presented a lecture that I recently attended

* To a friend's schoolteacher girlfriend, pointing her to a documentary online about some classroom sociology experiments that would interest her

* To a friend who might appreciate Tomoe River paper, a small sheaf

* To a childhood friend, birthday greetings and an anecdote about a recent experience that reminded me of something that we'd experienced together as teens

* To the correspondent mentioned above (with whom I exchange mail even though we also see one another in person), a pun that unexpectedly came up in a conversation

* To a recent high school grad from my church, a thinking-of-you letter while she is in Marine basic training

* To my godson's father, thanking him for helping me with a work project

* To the friend of a friend who had alerted us to the aforementioned lecture, a thanks for doing so

* To a schoolteacher friend with whom I had had a long talk (mostly a listen on my part) about his misgivings about his relationship with his work, an anecdote that I'd heard years ago, intended to suggest to him that there is more than one way to do things well

* To my brother, suggestions about equipment, supplies, and resources to support his wife's recent interest in improving her penmanship (condensed: If someone wants to focus on penmanship I think that they would do well to use a flexible nib; start with a dip pen for cost reasons)

* To a friend whom I see only in the summer, a LONG letter in response to a fast cluster of text messages that she had sent to me—my letter rambling about characteristics of various communications modes: phone, post, email, text message; touching on how writing with a pen improves the quality of my content and style

* To a friend who had helped with a brief work project, a letter of thanks and including some information and website URLS pertinent to our recent conversation

* To a friend considering seeking an ADD diagnosis in his early thirties, an article that might help him and his wife to sort out their perceptions (and lack thereof) of his symptoms

* To a childhood friend whom I see rarely, an inquiry about sending to his professional kitchen a young acquaintance who is interested in exploring a culinary career

* To my godson and his brother: a Valentine's Day card for each

* To my aforementioned corresponding friend, a postcard reminding her of an approaching lecture which we had talked several weeks ago of attending

* To my godson's mother, a thank-you note for a no-occasion gift, including an expression of curiosity about a workshop that she recently attended

* To a childhood friend and, later, college classmate, an invitation to a function at my church

* To my niece, a rather rambling letter relating an anecdote that a recent note from her reminded me of

* To a friend who is abroad for the semester, a note with photos of a recent activity that a member of her family was involved in

* To the childhood friend to whom I had earlier recommended a lecturer's book, several recommendations of things available on Netflix streaming—to which he had just subscribed

* A note to an old friend who now lives far away, explaining how I happened to come into possession of a copy of the just-released and immediately-sold-out Batman comic issue—one with a rather milestone plot development—and accompanying the gift of that comic, which he will appreciate

* A work-related thank-you note

* A second work-related thank-you note

* and half a dozen birthday cards

Edited by Epistler

www.PaperForFountainPens.com

Tomoe River Paper is a muse to me.

Link to post
Share on other sites
GreenVelvet

This thread caused me to pause and take note.

The following is a summary of my outgoing correspondences from the past two months. I hope that the descriptions of recipients and of content will inspire people to write some letters, notes, and cards of their own!

 

* To a friend who has Getting Things Done issues, an relevant insight that I once read

* To a friend with whom I watched the Up Series films several years ago, an alert that the next installment in the series has been produced

* To an old friend whom I rarely see these days, explaining an assignment at my job and asking if he could lend his expertise

* To a lifelong friend whom I see only a few times a year I pointed out a film that I think would interest him; I also updated him on activities in my new job

* To a friend and regular correspondent whom I see fairly often, a haiku on a postcard, spontaneously composed about my cat. This friend and I go through periods of regular correspondence even when we see each other face-to-face.

* To my sister-in-law, a note about my recent beginnings in a hobby which she has expressed interest in taking up; a photo of me thus engaged enclosed

* To my niece, thanking her for some help; reporting that I had noticed while out and about a behavior in others which I had talked about with her; and telling her that I had finally visited a museum which she used to frequent, letting her know that being there made me think of her

* To the Getting Things Done friend mentioned above, an explanatory note with a few copies of a novel day planner format that I'd stumbled upon

* To a very busy friend, another note with copies of that planner format

* To a friend who had emailed me with an invitation to an even that is a couple of months off and a mention that she'd run into a friend we have in common, an acceptance of that emailed invitation, a few words of appreciation about the third party, and some words of encouragement and inquiry about her first weeks in graduate school

* To an acquaintance who has posted on Facebook a commentary about an experience she had, an anecdote about a similar experience in my past

* To a different niece, encouraging her interest in fountain pens—which I'd only recently learned of

* To the busy friend mentioned above, thanking her for introducing me fifteen years ago to chai masala, a drink which came to mind recently after a long break

* To a friend in the midst of chemotherapy, a cheering note with some photos of her children from a few years ago

* To a childhood friend to whose mother I had sent a gift some months earlier, asking if he though she had received it and if it arrived in workable condition (it is unlike her to not acknowledge a gift, and I was reluctant to ask her about it directly)

* To an old friend who no longer lives nearby, a letter to enclose with a book that I was sending to her, explaining why I chose it for her (or her for it!) and urging her to read it

* A second, briefer note regarding the book gift just mentioned, written because I had misplaced the original (I ended up enclosing both with the book!)

* A thank-you note for a belated Christmas present

* A 2nd thank-you for a second belated present

* To a childhood friend, a note suggesting that he look into a book whose author presented a lecture that I recently attended

* To a friend's schoolteacher girlfriend, pointing her to a documentary online about some classroom sociology experiments that would interest her

* To a friend who might appreciate Tomoe River paper, a small sheaf

* To a childhood friend, birthday greetings and an anecdote about a recent experience that reminded me of something that we'd experienced together as teens

* To the correspondent mentioned above (with whom I exchange mail even though we also see one another in person), a pun that unexpectedly came up in a conversation

* To a recent high school grad from my church, a thinking-of-you letter while she is in Marine basic training

* To my godson's father, thanking him for helping me with a work project

* To the friend of a friend who had alerted us to the aforementioned lecture, a thanks for doing so

* To a schoolteacher friend with whom I had had a long talk (mostly a listen on my part) about his misgivings about his relationship with his work, an anecdote that I'd heard years ago, intended to suggest to him that there is more than one way to do things well

* To my brother, suggestions about equipment, supplies, and resources to support his wife's recent interest in improving her penmanship (condensed: If someone wants to focus on penmanship I think that they would do well to use a flexible nib; start with a dip pen for cost reasons)

* To a friend whom I see only in the summer, a LONG letter in response to a fast cluster of text messages that she had sent to me—my letter rambling about characteristics of various communications modes: phone, post, email, text message; touching on how writing with a pen improves the quality of my content and style

* To a friend who had helped with a brief work project, a letter of thanks and including some information and website URLS pertinent to our recent conversation

* To a friend considering seeking an ADD diagnosis in his early thirties, an article that might help him and his wife to sort out their perceptions (and lack thereof) of his symptoms

* To a childhood friend whom I see rarely, an inquiry about sending to his professional kitchen a young acquaintance who is interested in exploring a culinary career

* To my godson and his brother: a Valentine's Day card for each

* To my aforementioned corresponding friend, a postcard reminding her of an approaching lecture which we had talked several weeks ago of attending

* To my godson's mother, a thank-you note for a no-occasion gift, including an expression of curiosity about a workshop that she recently attended

* To a childhood friend and, later, college classmate, an invitation to a function at my church

* To my niece, a rather rambling letter relating an anecdote that a recent note from her reminded me of

* To a friend who is abroad for the semester, a note with photos of a recent activity that a member of her family was involved in

* To the childhood friend to whom I had earlier recommended a lecturer's book, several recommendations of things available on Netflix streaming—to which he had just subscribed

* A note to an old friend who now lives far away, explaining how I happened to come into possession of a copy of the just-released and immediately-sold-out Batman comic issue—one with a rather milestone plot development—and accompanying the gift of that comic, which he will appreciate

* A work-related thank-you note

* A second work-related thank-you note

* and half a dozen birthday cards

 

This list just made my day.

WRITE ON!!

:thumbup:

Link to post
Share on other sites

This thread caused me to pause and take note.

The following is a summary of my outgoing correspondences from the past two months. I hope that the descriptions of recipients and of content will inspire people to write some letters, notes, and cards of their own!

 

* To a friend who has Getting Things Done issues, an relevant insight that I once read

* To a friend with whom I watched the Up Series films several years ago, an alert that the next installment in the series has been produced

.......

 

Truly inspiring. Prompts the thought; rather than broadcast through facebook, how much nicer to 'narrowcast' with a fountain pen...

Link to post
Share on other sites

how much nicer to 'narrowcast' with a fountain pen...

 

Indeed.

There have been times when I was about to post a link or a comment to a friend's Facebook wall, and I decided to email instead—to emphasize that this communication was a gift to them, not a performance for the world; and then beyond that sometimes I have thought "No. That's still not a clear enough emphasis that this is for you". And it doesn't have to be really personal stuff. It could just be pointing out an author or an article or such of interest.

It just feels like a more directed, caring, generous, mindful, focused, gift-giving act to write to someone in post rather than to just post a link on their FB wall. And there are many dimensions to this: the time cost, the stationery cost, the postage cost, the extra time that writing with a pen takes, the better thought-out product that usually results, the individual expressions involved in paper/pen/ink/stamp choice (saying things perhaps about the writer, perhaps about the writer's perception of the receiver, perhaps about the writer's perception of his or her relationship with the receiver) and in the uniqueness of handwriting, the giving of a physical object that was once yours and was made with your own hands for a specific intended—much as if you had knitted them a sweater, the opportunity for the receiver to have and to keep a physical reminder of being thought of and cared about which has, among its significances, the role of being an enduring manifestation of the otherwise evanescent, abstract gift of time—the time taken to craft the letter.

Oh, yes! So much more than [here's a link on your wall].

 

And may I add: "Happy Birthday!" wishes on a Facebook wall do not count. Almost at all.

www.PaperForFountainPens.com

Tomoe River Paper is a muse to me.

Link to post
Share on other sites
GreenVelvet

 

There have been times when I was about to post a link or a comment to a friend's Facebook wall, and I decided to email instead—to emphasize that this communication was a gift to them, not a performance for the world; and then beyond that sometimes I have thought "No. That's still not a clear enough emphasis that this is for you". And it doesn't have to be really personal stuff. It could just be pointing out an author or an article or such of interest.

It just feels like a more directed, caring, generous, mindful, focused, gift-giving act to write to someone in post rather than to just post a link on their FB wall. And there are many dimensions to this: the time cost, the stationery cost, the postage cost, the extra time that writing with a pen takes, the better thought-out product that usually results, the individual expressions involved in paper/pen/ink/stamp choice (saying things perhaps about the writer, perhaps about the writer's perception of the receiver, perhaps about the writer's perception of his or her relationship with the receiver) and in the uniqueness of handwriting, the giving of a physical object that was once yours and was made with your own hands for a specific intended—much as if you had knitted them a sweater, the opportunity for the receiver to have and to keep a physical reminder of being thought of and cared about which has, among its significances, the role of being an enduring manifestation of the otherwise evanescent, abstract gift of time—the time taken to craft the letter.

Oh, yes! So much more than [here's a link on your wall].

 

And may I add: "Happy Birthday!" wishes on a Facebook wall do not count. Almost at all.

 

 

Bravo - beautifully stated!

Link to post
Share on other sites

It's interesting to think of the people who receive our notes and letters. I use email a lot because I have friends and family around the world, but I love to hand-write letters and have since I was a little girl. Here's my list of regulars, not counting annual letters I send to all of my friends and families:

 

- Half a dozen close friends across the country.

- letters to my four favourite inlaws in England

- my brother in Australia

- two of my brothers in Saskatchewan

- my five sisters

- my aunt in California

- my godfather in Alberta

- five nieces and one nephew

- Several friends who used to live in the same city but now live far away

- A friend in Manchester UK whom I've met twice but have got to know through letters and emails

- A former prof who was a true mentor

- A former colleague, now retired, who was suddenly widowed and is having a tough time

 

And last but not least, to my partner, in a special notebook.

 

Oddly enough, I no longer write to my parents, who are in their late 80s. They love emails and phone calls!

"Life would split asunder without letters." Virginia Woolf

Link to post
Share on other sites

my parents, who are in their late 80s. They love emails and phone calls!

 

My 85-year-old father is on his iPad all the time! Hours each day…

www.PaperForFountainPens.com

Tomoe River Paper is a muse to me.

Link to post
Share on other sites

- five nieces and one nephew

 

And last but not least, to my partner, in a special notebook.

 

Im just starting to write to my nieces and nephews - from freshly sprung to 16 years old. I'm curious ... do any of the nepotal relations write back to you?

 

The spousal notebook is an appealing idea, btw. I do not at all promise not to steal it.

---

Kenneth Moyle

Hamilton, Ontario

Link to post
Share on other sites

The young relations do indeed write back to me, some very sporadically but others quite regularly. The youngest is six; the eldest has small children now. I saved letters from her Mom (my sister) when she was little and presented them to her when she grew up. I hope to do the same for the second and third generations in future years! Kids just love getting a real letter in the mail, even those most devoted to social media.

 

Feel free to steal the spousal letter notebook idea, it was and continues to be a huge hit!

"Life would split asunder without letters." Virginia Woolf

Link to post
Share on other sites

to my partner, in a special notebook.

 

I have sometimes rotated twinned notebooks with a friend.

 

There have been a few months-long durations during which this particular friend and I have had a pair of twin journals, each of us with one of them at a time. We might write letters to each other in them, notes to ourselves, journalling-styleentries, grocery lists…whatever. And then periodically we exchange the volumes through the post.

It is a powerful method for keeping a distant person with you—and for helping them to feel that you are keeping them with you.

 

My journal-rotating friend will be going away again in a few weeks for at least several months, for the first time in a few years. I hope that we will renew the practice for this period.

www.PaperForFountainPens.com

Tomoe River Paper is a muse to me.

Link to post
Share on other sites

This thread inspired me. Just wrote a letter to one of my favorite authors. I recently found out he was very ill and is now nearly blind. Most likely the letter will not reach him, and instead will be seen by his assistants. However, perhaps there is a chance my words may be passed on so he knows folks still appreciate his writings. Thanks for the idea!

Flickr http://img244.imageshack.us/img244/5642/postcardde9.png

Link to post
Share on other sites

to my partner, in a special notebook.

 

I have sometimes rotated twinned notebooks with a friend.

 

There have been a few months-long durations during which this particular friend and I have had a pair of twin journals, each of us with one of them at a time. We might write letters to each other in them, notes to ourselves, journalling-styleentries, grocery lists…whatever. And then periodically we exchange the volumes through the post.

It is a powerful method for keeping a distant person with you—and for helping them to feel that you are keeping them with you.

 

My journal-rotating friend will be going away again in a few weeks for at least several months, for the first time in a few years. I hope that we will renew the practice for this period.

 

That is a superb idea! What a wonderful thing to share with a distant friend.

"Life would split asunder without letters." Virginia Woolf

Link to post
Share on other sites

I do not write regularly to anybody. But I recently purchased a present for an aunt of mine. She's a really sweet, smart lady. I typed her a letter on my antique Underwood typewriter. I folded it, then, I sealed it with wax, and addressed it to her using my Parker Duofold.

 

I think she'll be pleasantly surprised. Whenever it is that said letter and package arrives at her doorstep (I hope the seals survive the journey!!)

http://www.throughouthistory.com/ - My Blog on History & Antiques

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

As of now I don't write to anyone (I just got my first FP about two months ago), but I have an idea of something I want to start soon. Years ago I heard from someone that when she journals, she writes to her "future husband," even though at that time she didn't have any idea who that would be (she recently got engaged about two weeks ago).

 

I completely forgot about that conversation I had with her until a few days ago, and now I think it's a brilliant idea. I'm not dating anyone and I have absolutely no idea when that girl will come around that I am to marry, but I want there to be a chronicle of what my life was liking leading up to me asking the question. So as soon as I get some extra money to get some non-smearing ink and a new notebook, that's what I am planning on doing.

Edited by Colin8
Link to post
Share on other sites

Just tonight I finished a letter to one of my sister's sons. He is in Taiwan right now doing volunteer work for our church. His mother often forwards the emails he writes each week so I get a chance to find out what is going on. I hope he will take the time to write back.

 

I have a note to drop to a fellow FPN member over the next day or two then I will send them both at the same time. Both are international. The one to Taiwan, the other the UK.

Brad

"Words are, of course, the most powerful drug used by mankind" - Rudyard Kipling
"None of us can have as many virtues as the fountain-pen, or half its cussedness; but we can try." - Mark Twain

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now







×
×
  • Create New...