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Aurora Etiopia white ivory


goodguy
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...

Here's not a politc discussion place,

we're talking about items and not making any propaganda,

so please let's talk of pen and stop.

TX

P

Don't worry, I don't think anyone had the impression you made any propaganda. :)

But these pens speak for themselves in a way, exuding the usually ridiculous hybris of totalitarian systems. :D

 

Regarding the pen, the trench pen ink pill system is indeed a clever solution for FP usability in the desert heat. Any ink stored in a pen would evaporate within short time.

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I totally agree with SANPEI: we don't care about politics, we are only fascinated by a writing instruments with peculiarity that no other pens have. :notworthy1:

 

MY FAVOURITE VINTAGE FOUNTAIN PEN? THE ONE I DON'T HAVE!

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Yes, I'll add my thanks for all the history we've learned from these posts! A pen's history has always been a good part of its fascination for me. Thanks again!

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Amazing history there, thanks for posting! I have never seen anything like them.

 

Just a random musing though - I often wonder about whether I could own such an object associated with evil.

 

I'm fascinated by the history and have no ill will toward anyone who collects them (I do not know anyone who does so as a political statement) but I don't think I could ever bring myself to purchase a Montblanc or Pelikan "SS Special Edition" or Mao "Long March" model (to name what I hope are fictional examples...). I suppose that accounts partially for the scarcity of both the objects and detailed information on their history. I expect many were destroyed in a deliberate renunciation of the cause.

 

Let me restate that I see no problems with others who collect and research such objects - in general I believe that brushing such items under the rug does not do a service to the memory of those who gave their lives to fighting the evil originally associated with them.

Edited by AndyH

I'm Andy H and I approved this message.

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...but I don't think I could ever bring myself to purchase a Montblanc or Pelikan "SS Special Edition" or Mao "Long March" model (to name what I hope are fictional examples...). ...

 

Well, there is Jinhao's Long March Commemorative Pen...

 

https://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/in...showtopic=48444

 

https://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/in...showtopic=45691

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...but I don't think I could ever bring myself to purchase a Montblanc or Pelikan "SS Special Edition" or Mao "Long March" model (to name what I hope are fictional examples...). ...

 

Well, there is Jinhao's Long March Commemorative Pen...

 

https://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/in...showtopic=48444

 

https://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/in...showtopic=45691

 

 

Should have known better.

 

I guess I will have to amend my fictional example to the Pol Pot or Idi Amin commemorative.

 

Again, it's not that I object to the objects or to those who collect them. In fact I find them fascinating. I just don't think I could bring myself to buy one and wondering if I was alone in that feeling. I've seen little discussion of, for example, WWII era German pens, yet I'm sure that German companies must have produced models for the German government of the time, and probably prestige models decorated with symbols of the era.

 

The Italian Fascist regime is not associated with quite as much horror; perhaps this is why pens like this one are more openly discussed. Has the actual, factual history of pens produced for Hitler or Stalin's regime been lost to us? If so, I find that regrettable.

I'm Andy H and I approved this message.

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...but I don't think I could ever bring myself to purchase a Montblanc or Pelikan "SS Special Edition" or Mao "Long March" model (to name what I hope are fictional examples...). ...

 

Well, there is Jinhao's Long March Commemorative Pen...

 

https://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/in...showtopic=48444

 

https://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/in...showtopic=45691

 

 

Should have known better.

 

I guess I will have to amend my fictional example to the Pol Pot or Idi Amin commemorative.

 

Again, it's not that I object to the objects or to those who collect them. In fact I find them fascinating. I just don't think I could bring myself to buy one and wondering if I was alone in that feeling. I've seen little discussion of, for example, WWII era German pens, yet I'm sure that German companies must have produced models for the German government of the time, and probably prestige models decorated with symbols of the era.

 

The Italian Fascist regime is not associated with quite as much horror; perhaps this is why pens like this one are more openly discussed. Has the actual, factual history of pens produced for Hitler or Stalin's regime been lost to us? If so, I find that regrettable.

 

There has actually been too much discussion of WWII German pens, don't even bring it up! The most popular topic is whether there was ever a Montblanc pen with a swastika instead of the snowcap (there was not). There was also an endless (and most distasteful, in my opinion) thread expressing the wish that MB make an "Anne Frank Writer's Edition" pen.

 

The thing is, that fascist Germany's tastes were much less flamboyant than Italian tastes (read the books "Nazi Chic? Fashioning Women in the Third Reich", and "Fashion under Fascism: Beyond the Black Shirt", if this topic interests you from the academic perspective) and, so it is entirely possible that no spiffy nazi fountain pens were ever created.

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That's good to hear QM2; didn't know this was a sore subject, or that there had been much previous discussion.

 

This Italian discussion is fascinating though... and I appreciate all who've contributed.

I'm Andy H and I approved this message.

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