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The Universal Penman Pdf Online?



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http://books.google.com/books?id=ap66lHPQdZMC&printsec=frontcover#v=onepage&q&f=false

 

Within this web page lies a book titled "The Universal Penman" by John Robertson. Published 1830 in Oxford University. I don't know if it is "the" universal penman, but it certainly looks spectacular (although it is clear that it is digitized as the hairlines are not the clearest). I have found the examples in the book fascinating, especially the glorious flourishes available on page 109 (seems to be the same as the ones on 119)

 

Any thoughts? Could someone with a real book tell me if it's the same exact? I'd recommend taking it and downloading it even if it's not, the information is sound and the examples are amazing even if the hairlines aren't filled in in all the places.

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Since it is clearly public domain now, does anyone have a PDF of it? (that link is to a Google web-only viewing of it)

--

Glenn (love those pen posses)

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This is not _the_ Universal Penman - that one is compiled by George Bickham and consists of a series of plates from various masters.

 

I skimmed through this books and while the instructions on the stroke components are interesting I'm not sure I would recommend this for learning Copperplate. I saw many examples at various angles ranging from 44 degrees to 50 degrees which might be confusing for beginners. The different angles do lend the script a different character but none appear as balanced as with the accepted 55 degrees to me.

 

ETA: This book recommends either the straight or left-oblique cut of the quill rather than right-oblique as recommended by Bickham.

 

Salman

Edited by smk
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This is not _the_ Universal Penman - that one is compiled by George Bickham and consists of a series of plates from various masters.

 

I skimmed through this books and while the instructions on the stroke components are interesting I'm not sure I would recommend this for learning Copperplate. I saw many examples at various angles ranging from 44 degrees to 50 degrees which might be confusing for beginners. The different angles do lend the script a different character but none appear as balanced as with the accepted 55 degrees to me.

 

ETA: This book recommends either the straight or left-oblique cut of the quill rather than right-oblique as recommended by Bickham.

 

Salman

 

Interesting. Thanks for the clarification. I thought it might not be "the" universal penman. I downloaded the .pdf to look at letterforms but particularly flourishes as they had some pretty flourishes in there. It seems as I will have to just ask for the penman as a gift for christmas... Perhaps I will scan it and clean it up and make it a e-book since it's public domain...

 

Edit: Whoops, published in 1954, not quite public domain yet. I'll try and figure out when it can go into the public domain. Until then I think I'll make an ebook version of it for my own use. It'll go great on my iPad when I'm bored and want a good read.

Edited by thang1thang2
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  • 9 months later...

This is not _the_ Universal Penman - that one is compiled by George Bickham and consists of a series of plates from various masters.

 

I skimmed through this books and while the instructions on the stroke components are interesting I'm not sure I would recommend this for learning Copperplate. I saw many examples at various angles ranging from 44 degrees to 50 degrees which might be confusing for beginners. The different angles do lend the script a different character but none appear as balanced as with the accepted 55 degrees to me.

 

ETA: This book recommends either the straight or left-oblique cut of the quill rather than right-oblique as recommended by Bickham.

 

Salman

 

Sorry to revive an old thread, but could I know which one is 'the' Universal Penman?

 

I saw one on amazon (http://www.amazon.com/Universal-Penman-Lettering-Calligraphy-Typography/dp/0486206165)

 

But this one is also from George Bickham and is publised in 1954.

 

Could I know which one is the original one, and where I could get it?

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That is the one. The collection was originally published by George Bickham in 1733 (IIRC). The 1954 date is by whoever has publishing rights now - you have found the right one :-)

 

S.

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Thanks!

 

If you don't mind, could I ask you one more thing?

 

What script does the Universal Penman concentrate on? I would like to learn the copperplate and the spencerian, and at the moment I am leaning more towards copperplate, and is this book great in learning copperplate? Or which script does it concentrate on?

 

Also, I might be going too far ahead, but I would also like to know how to ornate letters, and would I get that information on this book as well?

 

I just really want to get a feel of what this book contains. The reviews and introduction of this book on amazon gives almost no information at all.

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It's almost entirely Copperplate. It doesn't teach you copperplate, persay, it's more a book of the finest exemplars on the planet.

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You are most welcome SPark9625.

 

The Universal Penman, while providing the best examples of Copperplate, does not have any instructions on how to learn the hand. It is a great book to have so one can study the excellent plates and know what can be achieved.

 

You can find a number of (free) books with instructions on how to learn Copperplate here: http://www.iampeth.com/lessons_copperplate.php (I followed instructions by W.A. Baird as well as videos by Dr. Joe Vitolo linked further down on the suggested page)

 

Flourishing is an art form that can be used to decorate your lettering. Again free instructions are available on IAMPETH: http://www.iampeth.com/lessons_flourishing.php

 

You might get some guidance in the thread titled 'Learning Copperplate' in this forum.

 

Salman

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I bought my first copy of The Universal Penman off an outdoor bookstall in Paris many years ago. It had been badly buckled by exposure to the rain and cost virtually nothing. Years later, when it finally disintegrated, I bought a second copy. As it's a large book and a little unwieldy, I cut off the spine, punched the pages and kept it in a ring binder. This is my reference book. As an indulgence, I bought a third copy which I have kept in pristine condition - just to have. Of all books; fact and fiction, this is my favourite of all, and I wouldn't be without it.

 

As Salman pointed out, this is not a how-to-do-it book as there are no instructions. This is a copmpilation of the work of twenty-five English scribes, engraved onto copper for reproduction by Calligrapher/Engraver George Bickham. This explains why the style became known generally as Copperplate. It was produced over a period of eight years in fifty-two parts. Compiled into a book, there are 212 plates on large pages (12 1/4" x 8 1/2") which allows the lettering to be seen to best advantage.

 

I think that a copy of this book plus good instruction is the best way to go. Of the material currently available, my personal choice would be to download from IAMPETH 'The Art of Writing' by John Jenkins c1813. It contains beautiful exemplars and comprehensive instructions - and it's free!

 

Those who love 'Copperplate' and haven't yet seen 'The Universal Penman' are in for a real treat.

 

Ken

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Thank you!

 

So would you say that getting this book is not for introduction, but to have a reference, and adopt some of them into your writing?

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Thank you!

 

So would you say that getting this book is not for introduction, but to have a reference, and adopt some of them into your writing?

I believe that this book demonstrates the best examples of the style ever produced and used in conjunction with good instructions is the way to go.

 

Ken

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  • 7 years later...
MaxDeMendizabal
On 11/28/2012 at 12:56 PM, thang1thang2 said:

http://books.google.com/books?id=ap66lHPQdZMC&printsec=frontcover#v=onepage&q&f=false

 

Within this web page lies a book titled "The Universal Penman" by John Robertson. Published 1830 in Oxford University. I don't know if it is "the" universal penman, but it certainly looks spectacular (although it is clear that it is digitized as the hairlines are not the clearest). I have found the examples in the book fascinating, especially the glorious flourishes available on page 109 (seems to be the same as the ones on 119)

 

Any thoughts? Could someone with a real book tell me if it's the same exact? I'd recommend taking it and downloading it even if it's not, the information is sound and the examples are amazing even if the hairlines aren't filled in in all the places.

Thank you for the reference. I just downloaded it. 

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