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Lamy 2000 And The Origins Of Lamy Design


bphollin

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I don't know why but my F nib 2000 is easily a wet medium, bordering on broad. My EF is a real EF, though it's a little toothy and kind of dry (but never skips)

 

I love the look and feel of the 2000 so much that I own two, but I just keep finding myself reaching for other pens.

Selling a boatload of restored, fairly rare, vintage Japanese gold nib pens, click here to see (more added as I finish restoring them)

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Great article on an iconic design for sure. I do however find the pen (or actually one part of it) somewhat challenged when it comes to ergonomics. The pen body's external shape is one of the primary defining features of the L2K and indicates that it was designed primarily with this simplicity and elegance of shape and aesthetics in mind. I mean, that shape defines the pen.

 

My greatest point of dissatisfaction is the rather strong, smooth, convex taper of the section to a somewhat slim/acute point. It just makes it a challenge to use for longer spells. This is also affected by the materials and surface treatment of the pen, if your hands/fingers sweat it starts to feel slippery pretty quick. All of that combines to a pen that makes you feel subconsciously that you need to exert more force (than probably is necessary) to hold the pen in place leading to a writing experience that makes you tire faster.

Also, this taper makes certain grips and writing styles which are perfectly fine with pens that do not have as radical change in barrel or section diameter more cumbersome. For me it changes the style of my handwriting making it less controlled and round.

 

I have, for a few weeks now, had a vintage L2K inked on my desk (most likely from around early 70s, old style with the W. Germany engraving on cap). I dug it out of storage to have a second look and go at the pen, to see if it would feel more usable than the last time. Sadly, no.

 

My vintage Pelikan 100Ns and Parker 51s (and also some other pens I have inked such as the later gen hooded Lamy 99 and more modern ones) run around it in circles when it comes to the writing experience and pleasure/ease of use.

 

Also, the wide variety of the pens I have inked, with slimmer, fatter, more slightly tapered, straight, concave, smooth, textured etc. plastic sections do not affect my hand writing style that much. The L2K does. So sadly, while I do admire it as an exercise in industrial design (I come from arts/applied arts/product design background and currently work in the field of UX & Service Design), among other things in purity of shape and aesthetics, it does have it's issues ergonomics/usability wise.

 

The same actually applies to one other pen that I was all over for earlier (namely, when I studied product design in the late 90s), the rOtring 600. Wonderful looking industrial design for designs sake there with plenty of neat engineered details but... it also falls into the "lovely to look at and handle but pain to use for longer periods of time" category for other reasons (namely, the weight and how it is distributed on the pen).

 

For some people the section and the shape of the pen are not a problem at all (yes, quite many people do love the L2K) but it is not the panacea and answer to everyone's writing needs that some people try to make it out to be. Most definitely do give one a try though. :)

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I also wanted to love this pen. I like how it looks and have a number of pens both considerably lighter and considerably heavier. But given the price, I did not immediately buy one; I arranged to borrow one from a colleague for a week.

 

Instead, I flushed and returned it after one day. My problem was that the balance of the Makrolon 2000 is weighted much farther toward the point than other pens I have used, with the result that I felt not as if I had to exert more force, as you describe, but as if I had to grip the pen more tightly, to hold it up, in order to maintain my usual very light touch. With most of my heavier pens, I let the barrel of the pen rest on my hand, leaving my fingers relaxed.

 

I might do better with the steel one. It strikes me that the problem with the balance of the Makrolon for me could be that the heavier material--the metal--is near the nib.

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Someone mentioned that theirs sang at first and now doesn't after some use. I have had the exact same experience. It's much quieter than a mouse now. ;) Better ink flow too.

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Great article on an iconic design for sure. I do however find the pen (or actually one part of it) somewhat challenged when it comes to ergonomics. The pen body's external shape is one of the primary defining features of the L2K and indicates that it was designed primarily with this simplicity and elegance of shape and aesthetics in mind. I mean, that shape defines the pen.

 

My greatest point of dissatisfaction is the rather strong, smooth, convex taper of the section to a somewhat slim/acute point. It just makes it a challenge to use for longer spells. This is also affected by the materials and surface treatment of the pen, if your hands/fingers sweat it starts to feel slippery pretty quick. All of that combines to a pen that makes you feel subconsciously that you need to exert more force (than probably is necessary) to hold the pen in place leading to a writing experience that makes you tire faster.

 

Also, this taper makes certain grips and writing styles which are perfectly fine with pens that do not have as radical change in barrel or section diameter more cumbersome. For me it changes the style of my handwriting making it less controlled and round.

 

I have, for a few weeks now, had a vintage L2K inked on my desk (most likely from around early 70s, old style with the W. Germany engraving on cap). I dug it out of storage to have a second look and go at the pen, to see if it would feel more usable than the last time. Sadly, no.

 

My vintage Pelikan 100Ns and Parker 51s (and also some other pens I have inked such as the later gen hooded Lamy 99 and more modern ones) run around it in circles when it comes to the writing experience and pleasure/ease of use.

 

Also, the wide variety of the pens I have inked, with slimmer, fatter, more slightly tapered, straight, concave, smooth, textured etc. plastic sections do not affect my hand writing style that much. The L2K does. So sadly, while I do admire it as an exercise in industrial design (I come from arts/applied arts/product design background and currently work in the field of UX & Service Design), among other things in purity of shape and aesthetics, it does have it's issues ergonomics/usability wise.

 

The same actually applies to one other pen that I was all over for earlier (namely, when I studied product design in the late 90s), the rOtring 600. Wonderful looking industrial design for designs sake there with plenty of neat engineered details but... it also falls into the "lovely to look at and handle but pain to use for longer periods of time" category for other reasons (namely, the weight and how it is distributed on the pen).

 

For some people the section and the shape of the pen are not a problem at all (yes, quite many people do love the L2K) but it is not the panacea and answer to everyone's writing needs that some people try to make it out to be. Most definitely do give one a try though. :)

Sadly my experience of this pen is the same as yours - no doubt a wonderful pen but unusable for me because of the slippery feel in my hand .

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  • 2 months later...
  • 6 months later...

So I thought I might make a small contribution to this excellent thread with another variation on the Lamy 2000 clip. I recently picked up a vintage 2000, and upon disassembly I was presented with this different clip design and operation.

 

Unlike the clips pictured in the amazing article by the author, you can see that the clip a simple ring at the top of its form. This rests on the cap notch underneath the top screw in disc. The inner body of the top of the cap has a small cutout in which the spring is partially recessed and can be removed as normal. This then allows the clip to be spring loaded based on the clip ring resting on top. A simple variation but worth noting in case there are more folks out there that love a good vintage 2000.Some photo's attached below:

 

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Short cuts make delays, but inns make longer ones.
Frodo Baggins, The Fellowship of the Ring, A Short Cut to Mushrooms

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  • 2 months later...

Wow! What an in-depth read on the Lamy 2000! I bought my medium nibbed (broad for everyone else) 2000 back in 2002 or 2003, can't quite remember. The piston assembly had to be replaced back in 2010-11 and It's been trouble free ever since.

"Life moves pretty fast, if you do not stop and look around once and a while you might just miss it."

Ferris Bueller

 

 

 

Bill Smith's Photography

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  • 2 months later...

Great to see this classic thread pop up on page 1 again. Of course, I had to read through bphollin's magnum opus on all things L2K.

 

My 2000 EF was my first "expensive" and "high-end" fountain pen. I believe I paid about $90 for it new from a seller in Malaysia. It was made before the design change to the section and the metal threads. So it suffered, to my great dismay, from the all-too-common cracked section. Off it went to Bob Nurin, and back it came, quick as a bunny, as essentially a new pen (the cap is shinier/less matte than the barrel... probably always will be). Great customer service!

 

The 2000 was, and remains, my favorite, rivaled only by my one and only Parker 51 aero. It sits at my elbow right now, full of Diamine Registrar's ink. I'm an unabashed fan.

Happiness is an Indian ED!
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  • 3 months later...

Simply great, a perfect review of an outstanding pen.

Very interesting.

Thank you

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Great read!

 

I have a steel L2K in M that writes M width but is 3B juicy in terms of wetness, and a Makrolon and Amber in M as well...great, reliable workhorse pens.

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  • 2 months later...

Well, I've gone and done it again. The pen I hate to love...... I've just bought my fifth L2K. All the other four have been sold on. I've never owned more than one at a time and within 6 months of selling one I always want another one. Addicted I guess. I've always loved the uncomplicated look and design but never found one that wrote quite how I wanted it to. I've just bought a medium nibbed example on eBay. It arrived fully boxed and immaculate. The medium nib of course writes a near broad line, which is what I was hoping for. I have it inked with Blackstone Barrier Reef Blue and it writes beautifully. Absolutely fabulous. But how long will this love last before it turns.......? ;)

Edited by Aysedasi

http://www.aysedasi.co.uk

 

 

 

 

She turned me into a newt.......

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Absolutely fabulous. But how long will this love last before it turns.......? ;)

 

Into a Conid Minimalistica?? :yikes: :yikes: :yikes:

"Simplicate and add Lightness."

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A Conid? Yes, I'd love one. But way beyond my budget....

 

Mine too. I put bit aside each month for six months.

"Simplicate and add Lightness."

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  • 3 weeks later...

very informative! Lamy 2000 might not be the best fountain(my major complaint is its nib being too slippy), but to me Lamy 2000 mechanical pencil definitely is the best mechanical pencil ever.

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  • 2 weeks later...

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