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Filling Systems: Best Or All Equal ?


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I wonder if there is a "best" filling system or are they all equal ?

 

1) Lever filler ?

 

2) Eyedropfiller ?

 

3) Converter ?

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All filling systems do one thing: draw up ink for later use. Some people nub the cartridge converter pens, others snub the mechanically complex piston fillers, some like no mechanisms at all going for an eyedropper. So, they are all equal in what they do, just some hold more or some hold less ink. Just really depends on what you like.

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All filling systems do one thing: draw up ink for later use. Some people nub the cartridge converter pens, others snub the mechanically complex piston fillers, some like no mechanisms at all going for an eyedropper. So, they are all equal in what they do, just some hold more or some hold less ink. Just really depends on what you like.

 

Thx, I did what research on youtube: is a eyedropper always "safe" ??? Imagine it starts to leak in your pocket ?

 

And how exactly works a lever filler ? Is this also wit a rubber sack inside ?

 

I can imagine that some systems have a longer life expactation than others ???

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"best" in what sense?

 

Eyedropper is best, because there are no parts to take care of or replace - lever filler, piston fillers and the lot usually need to take care for. You have to replace a sac, a cork... With an eyedropper you can just buy a 80 year old or you could lay it to rest for 15 years and it's still fine.

 

Converter is best, because you can often switch the inks and don't have to write pages over pages until you can change the ink.

 

Piston filler is best, when you are interested in technical things and like watching your demonstrator work.

 

Lever filler is best when you want to hear sounds - a good lever filler can give a nice "whoooosh"

 

Snorkel filler is best when playing pranks or sucking up the last drop.

 

What is "best"???

Greetings,

Michael

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]

 

Thx, I did what research on youtube: is a eyedropper always "safe" ??? Imagine it starts to leak in your pocket ?

 

And how exactly works a lever filler ? Is this also wit a rubber sack inside ?

 

I can imagine that some systems have a longer life expactation than others ???

Providing the seal is good (I think threads are often greased too?), eye droppers are safe. No more risky than a piston turning in your pocket, or a VP being clicked.

 

Some systems naturally will require more maintenance than others, though this also depends on how well the pen is kept. Cartridge/converters are unlikely to have fault unless you manage to destroy the nipple on the section; converters are inexpensive to replace. Sac-based filling may require a new sac fitting.

 

All my pens are either piston-fillers (because I personally like them, and the ink windows are handy) or cartridge/converter (for the convenience and flexibility).

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there's only the best filling system for you, different for others

Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing

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there's only the best filling system for you, different for others

Definitely agree with this. Everyone has their preferences.

 

Eyedroppers have the largest capacity, so if you write a lot and/or use a very broad, wet nib, this (or a piston filler) is the way to go. Eyedroppers do have a couple downsides - namely, they can leak if sealed improperly and if not insulated, can "burp" ink from the feed if it's low on ink and it heats up (i.e. in your hand). The capacity can also be a downside for some - some people like to change inks often.

 

Piston fillers are similar to eyedroppers, with a bit less capacity. The main advantages are ink capacity, ease of filling (stick the nib in the bottle and twist the blind cap), and the "cool factor" of the more mechanically complex pen. Potential disadvantages are ink capacity (if you like to change inks), more difficult to clean, and more parts to break.

 

Lever fillers are pretty cool, but uncommon in modern pens. They're fairly similar to a C/C or aerometric filler, though there's no ability to change filling mechanisms, and there's no need to take apart the pen to fill it. The lever compresses the sac, and as it expands, it draws ink into the pen - pretty simple. It has a similar capacity to the C/C and aerometric, but it's a bit easier to fill since the pen doesn't need to be disassembled. If you buy an non-refurbished one, the sac will likely be broken or will break soon - they do have a shelf life.

 

C/C is the most common filling method these days and one of the most convenient since it doesn't require carrying a bottle of ink around for refills. If your converter runs out, just swap it for a cartridge and you're good to go. They're also pretty easy to clean since they can be disassembled. They have pretty small capacities though, which can be a good or a bad thing.

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I use mainly C/C pens and I love them. However, I find that with Piston pens, I

am more attentive to how I clean them and keep them maintained....

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I find piston-fillers best suited for me. When it comes to cleaning eyedroppers are the best. And when I want to be awed snorkel-fillers are always there. Cartridges are handy but I find them taking backseat when it comes to choosing/mixing colours...

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Well, I used to be a pumper fanatic, but I must be getting old. Now I appreciate how quickly and cleanly I can fill a cartridge or convertor with a hypo. Even more, I appreciate how easy it is to clean cartridge pens. 'Course Platinum and Sailor make it easy to like cartridge pens.

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I don't like pens with rubber sacs (in my experience they tend to be higher-maintenance, and the sacs can degrade or ossify), but aside from those I've found I like all of the filling systems equally. I'm not too fond of cartridges either, and will always opt for a converter if one is available.

 

It really does come down to personal preference, though.

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Hi,

 

In addition to the points mentioned, I consider that the choice of filling system is also the choice of the flushing system.

 

When the filling system is integral to the pen, (e.g. aerometric, lever fillers, vacuum fillers), then the filling system must be cycled with water to flush the ink from the pen.

 

For some, that may have a bearing on their choice of inks for pens with integral fill-flush systems: the higher maintenance inks, such as bulletproof & nano-pigmented inks, that require many fill-flush cycles to come clean might be avoided; and simple lower saturation dye-based inks, such as Waterman & Skrip, that flush with comparative ease, may be preferred.

 

Also, if there happens to be some residual dye-based ink left in the pen, it is unlikely to cause significant long-term problems.

 

The use of benign pen-cleaning solutions lessens the problem, but there is still more wear & tear to cleanse those pens than to fill them.

 

Bye,

S1

Edited by Sandy1

The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.

 

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there's only the best filling system for you, different for others

 

I'm fine with all of them. I spend way more time writing that I do filling . . .

JLT (J. L. Trasancos, Barneveld, NY)

 

"People with courage and character always seem sinister to the rest."

Hermann Hesse (1877 - 1962)

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I prefer levers because they are simple use and usually pretty simple to fix. I like that with a little time and some common home tools, I can fix any of the lever fillers I have if there's a problem.

 

I'll throw the old Parker button-fillers like the Duofolds in there too, because they do what the lever filler does, but with a push instead of a pull.

 

I've fixed up dozens of these lever/button pens with the basic tool kit I have.

Edited by Ray-Vigo
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My bulb filler is such a pain I never use it. Sad because it was my father"s and one of my nicest nibs.

I am liking eye droppers for the ink capacity.

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I'm not a fan of eyedropper pens as a rule, I have several, I've tried to love them, but it's a bad romance at best. Due to temperature changes and to a lesser extent altitude changes in my local area they tend to burp ink, even when completely full. They will leave the house at about 70F sit in my pocket on the way to work, warm up under my jacket at the same time be exposed to aprox 500ft elevation changes and bingo, I'll un cap at work and have a handful of ink! My pens of other filler designs don't do this to me, be it lever, piston, plunger, or C/C.

 

So other than eyedroppers, they all seem equal!

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I'll un cap at work and have a handful of ink!

So you should take a nice ink (that you love) every day. So whenever you look at your hand you can feel a warm glow in your heart.

Greetings,

Michael

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When there is a choice my preference generally would be for a cartridge pen, but a well made filling system is better than a poorly made system. The one that I really don't much like is an eye dropper. There are very good reasons that design was tossed on the thrash heap of history about a hundred years ago.

 

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