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What Chinese Pens Are You Using Today?



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This particular pen is very easy to turn into a very nice writer. Usually all that is required is to carefully flush it to remove any residue of manufacture followed by a little very simple nib work. The principle cause of scratchiness side to side is misalignment of the tines. Take a 30X magnifying glass and look at the end of the tines and make sure they align properly. Bend the lower one up carefully till they align. The next step is to floss and shim the nib. Use a thin sheet of brass foil for this purpose, not a hard razor knife, because they can scratch the plating off. Spread the tines by flossing with the brass shim. As you floss push the shim into the ink channel in the feed and carefully draw it in and out. Then put the shim between the nib and the feed and make sure the nib is evenly spaced above the feed. After doing this smooth the nib gently by drawing figure 8 half a dozen or so times on 5.0 micron abrasive film. Press down and roll the nib from side to side as you draw. Then repeat on 0.5 micron film. Do not over do it. If you cannot get the film, use a brown paper bag, but you will have to do repetitions. You should end up with a very smooth juicy pen.

 

Thanks for the informations I played with the pen tonight and found that the tines doesn't have the same profile. One tine go higher than the other midway and even if I align them at the end, in the middle it still a little bit higher. Will wait for my nib kit to switch it with a better one. The feed channel was quite dirty and almost closed in a section so I used aluminum sheet but it's hard to keep it in the channel. I'll try to find some brass foil this WE. In the mean time I use a blade to give the channel a slight V shape. It's a good pen to experiment and I have another one coming anyway.

 

Where can I find the micron abrasive film ? should I try in crafting store, air plane model store or something like that ?

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Thanks for the informations I played with the pen tonight and found that the tines doesn't have the same profile. One tine go higher than the other midway and even if I align them at the end, in the middle it still a little bit higher. Will wait for my nib kit to switch it with a better one. The feed channel was quite dirty and almost closed in a section so I used aluminum sheet but it's hard to keep it in the channel. I'll try to find some brass foil this WE. In the mean time I use a blade to give the channel a slight V shape. It's a good pen to experiment and I have another one coming anyway.

 

Where can I find the micron abrasive film ? should I try in crafting store, air plane model store or something like that ?

 

Micron abrasive is available from Lee Valley tools and similar shops: http://www.leevalley.com/US/wood/page.aspx?p=33004&cat=1,43072

The dirty feed channel will make the pen run too dry. It can be cleaned by flushing with ammonia solution (10%-20% strength)

If you are getting a new nib, you will lose nothing experimenting with this one. Use your thumbnail to raise the lower tine, gently and see how much pressure is needed to bend it up slightly.

The brass shims are 2 or 3 times thicker than aluminum foil. Even with brass shims it takes practice. But once you have done one nib, you will have the confidence to tackle any other in future, so experiment.

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richardandtracy

Decided to ring the changes today.

A Jinhao Century in blue 'celluloid' (actually acrylic acetate) and a Kaigelu 306.

 

The Jinhao is a great writer, and the Kaigelu is almost as good as a P61. I just wish it had a medium rather than fine nib.

 

Regards,

 

Richard.

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A hero 316 in red and a Wing Sung 322. I think BOTH of them were $5 (on sale).

Crazy. They both write well out of the box, and start right up easily.

The WS is a bit more nicely finished and attractive.

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A Wing Sung 322. Cost me $1.50 from ISellPens. Okay, there was $6 postage, but that was spread across several other items on the order.

 

Just got it on a whim, and it's pretty ugly with a cheap gold stars motif, but it writes amazingly well, definitely a keeper. Filled with Diamine Asa Blue at the moment.

"So convenient a thing it is to be a reasonable creature, since it enables one to find or make a reason for everything one has a mind to do."

 

- Benjamin Franklin

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Returning to fountain pens after a long 15 year hiatus. This is also my very first post here, although I have been lurking for months. I had a Cross Classic which through various moves was lost in a box in the attic somewhere, so I needed a new pen. Finances are tight and cheap was the key word while looking for a pen so Chinese or ROC pens seem to be my best choices. I just didn't really expect them to be as good as my old Cross and in some cases even better. In just two short months I started with a Jinhao 9009 M nib, a good writer, starts every time. Bought a few ink samples from Goulet (no affiliation), but settled on PR Tanzanite. It was my everyday pen, banishing ball points and gel pens to the back of the drawer. Then a Baoer Eight Horses M nib. This pen turned into a backup since it is a bit of a slow starter and a bit drier writer than the Jinhao, it could also be the Diamine Sunset its filled with. Since then I have purchased too TWSBI's, a 540 and a 540 ROC with M and F nibs respectively. The 540 is my regular daily use pen, while technically not China Chinese, it it still ROC Chinese. I like the 540 ROC better but until I finish the Caran d'Ache Amazon it's inked with I will only use it to play with.

 

What I didn't know is how addicting Chinese made pens could become. As inexpensive as they are it is fun to 'take a gamble' on which one will turn out to be a gem in disguise. So far I purchased one for my wife and daughter. My wife got a Jinhao Morbidezza, which will likely get replaced by something a bit daintier. My daughter has an even less expensive Hero Accountant Pen, and wants another more ornate pen.

 

I am now waiting on several more Chinese pens, since many places are closed during the Chinese holidays the wait has made me even more anxious. Three more pens should be here in a couple of weeks: Dolce Vita Naranja, Yiren 823 in Orange Marble and a Baoer 817 Exquisite Orange. Besides these I have several other Chinese pens in my eBay watch list. I will try to make my next post in the Introductions forum.

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Sailor Kenshin

The Duke I am test-driving has the number 2008 on it.

 

It's a pretty impressive-looking flat-top, with a channeled silvertone barrel and a red cap with clouds all over. Kind of a heavyweight, too, though usually I prefer lightweights.

 

I have a few other Chinese pens that await tweaking and possibly stubbing. None of those are Hero or other 'name' brands, but they, too, look impressive, and at their price point (not one of them more than $8) I don't feel too bad about trying to improve the flow or stub-sperimentation.

My other pen is a Montblanc and...

 

My other blog is a tumblr.

 

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A Baoer 8 Horses loaded with BSB. Love it!

 

I've been carrying around an 8 Horses with Zhivago. I tend to have to sign stuff throughout the day, and I like the bulletproofness along with the nice zig my Baoer give my signature.

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The Duke I am test-driving has the number 2008 on it.

 

It's a pretty impressive-looking flat-top, with a channeled silvertone barrel and a red cap with clouds all over. Kind of a heavyweight, too, though usually I prefer lightweights.

 

I have a few other Chinese pens that await tweaking and possibly stubbing. None of those are Hero or other 'name' brands, but they, too, look impressive, and at their price point (not one of them more than $8) I don't feel too bad about trying to improve the flow or stub-sperimentation.

can u show us a pic of that Duke?

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What I didn't know is how addicting Chinese made pens could become. As inexpensive as they are it is fun to 'take a gamble' on which one will turn out to be a gem in disguise.

 

This resonates with me. I enjoy the 'take a gamble' aspect and have been relatively pleased so far with my acquisitions. It is addicting, but I can think of worse addictions!

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A Baoer 8 Horses loaded with BSB. Love it!

 

I've been carrying around an 8 Horses with Zhivago. I tend to have to sign stuff throughout the day, and I like the bulletproofness along with the nice zig my Baoer give my signature.

 

The 'nice zig' I get with the medium nib on mine has been enticing me away from my preference for fine nibs. It is a great pen for signatures especially given the "wow" I usually get from people who aren't familiar with "fancy" pens.

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Returning to fountain pens after a long 15 year hiatus. This is also my very first post here, although I have been lurking for months.

... snip...

Welcome!

Sounds like you have some great adventures there. You might try flushing each pen as it arrives (with mild dishwashing detergent solution or mild ammonia solution) and then rinsing it a few times. That will often solve problems with slow starting or dry writing. Residues do tend to get stuck in the feeds during manufacturing.

ron

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Sailor Kenshin

The Duke I am test-driving has the number 2008 on it.

 

It's a pretty impressive-looking flat-top, with a channeled silvertone barrel and a red cap with clouds all over. Kind of a heavyweight, too, though usually I prefer lightweights.

 

I have a few other Chinese pens that await tweaking and possibly stubbing. None of those are Hero or other 'name' brands, but they, too, look impressive, and at their price point (not one of them more than $8) I don't feel too bad about trying to improve the flow or stub-sperimentation.

can u show us a pic of that Duke?

 

As soon as it stops being too dark.

My other pen is a Montblanc and...

 

My other blog is a tumblr.

 

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The Duke I am test-driving has the number 2008 on it.

 

It's a pretty impressive-looking flat-top, with a channeled silvertone barrel and a red cap with clouds all over. Kind of a heavyweight, too, though usually I prefer lightweights.

 

I have a few other Chinese pens that await tweaking and possibly stubbing. None of those are Hero or other 'name' brands, but they, too, look impressive, and at their price point (not one of them more than $8) I don't feel too bad about trying to improve the flow or stub-sperimentation.

can u show us a pic of that Duke?

 

As soon as it stops being too dark.

ah, found it on the net. thanx anyways!

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richardandtracy

I am using a Hero 5020 (Parker Sonnet copy) today with BSB in it. Unfortunately whatever pen I use it in can't stop the ink misbehaving. At least, as it has only ever had BSB in it, I need not worry about the ink objecting to other residue.

 

Must get a Baoer 388 to see if that has any Sonnet compatible/interchangable parts. This one hasn't even though it looks similar.

 

Regards,

 

Richard.

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Hero 100 - a Chinese pen through and through, inspired by the Parker 51 but not a copy of it, trustworthy, practical, and a good writer.

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What I didn't know is how addicting Chinese made pens could become. As inexpensive as they are it is fun to 'take a gamble' on which one will turn out to be a gem in disguise.

 

This resonates with me. I enjoy the 'take a gamble' aspect and have been relatively pleased so far with my acquisitions. It is addicting, but I can think of worse addictions!

If a pen doesn't work out, I have no issues fiddling with it or even breaking one since most of them have been under $8 shipped.

 

Returning to fountain pens after a long 15 year hiatus. This is also my very first post here, although I have been lurking for months.

... snip...

Welcome!

Sounds like you have some great adventures there. You might try flushing each pen as it arrives (with mild dishwashing detergent solution or mild ammonia solution) and then rinsing it a few times. That will often solve problems with slow starting or dry writing. Residues do tend to get stuck in the feeds during manufacturing.

ron

I already have two other vices, I tend to collect bicycles, and have a custom carbon tandem, Plus my collection of old Pentax lenses. I really didn't need anything else to collect.

 

Still waiting for three more Chinese pens in the mail.

Bud

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can't believe i havn't used a chinese pen in over three days... will see tomorrow (rather today, it's after midnight).

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Just rotated a Jinhao X450 into operation. It's physically beautiful, a tapered design reminiscent of the Sheaffer Balance with a gray and white marbled barrel, black end caps, and gold-plated trim. Writes a very smooth medium line, almost exactly medium wetness, with a tiny bit of feedback on bagasse paper. It's heavier, and with a slightly top-weighted balance when I'm writing, so it's an adjustment after vintage celluloid pens, but it quickly becomes comfortable. Pretty much a faultless pen.

ron

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