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Osmiroid Drawing Set Question



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I just purchased this set off of ebay for $26.00

http://www.ebay.com/itm/160683443256

 

I was thinking hard before bidding but then I remembered that osmiroid nibs could be used in esties and I have a bunch of esties. So, in the worst case, if the pen needs restoration, I could still use the nibs.

 

 

Anybody used this pen or this set before? Can this set be used for regular writing, note taking etc.? Any other comment is welcome too. Thank you.

Edited by smodak
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I have a similar set, the nibs are stiff italic. It is something you should have, like a P-51.

 

The Italic book by Osmiroid is not as good as 'Handwriting' by John LE F. Dumpleton.

 

 

I have a couple of Easties also so you can use them there. I need to re-sac my Easties, so only have one working.

 

The prices of pens have jumped in the last six months. I paid lots less but I bought mine from England. I've not noticed them up all the time. I will say I've not looked all the time for them.

The nibs are worth what you paid.

They are not stubs, they sharp italic.

 

There are a lot of stiff nib Italic Hands one can learn. Six of the basic Italic strokes can be used in maxi-semi-flex/'flexi' or easy full flex fancy writing, with out going into Spencerian or Copperplate.

 

You made a smart buy.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

RIP...200's once great nib, now a double ball.:crybaby::wallbash:

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 

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Ernst Bitterman

That looks like an Osmiroid 65. For regular writing, I'm not sure I can completely endorse it, as my own experience with the Osmiroid points is that they never quite got the whole ink/air exchange figured out. They work, but not with great consistency; your powers of dealing with frustration will define your own willingness to put up with the performance. When they are actually producing ink, the marks are well shaped, so for calligraphy projects where one feels less time pressure, they're great.

Ravensmarch Pens & Books
It's mainly pens, just now....

Oh, good heavens. He's got a blog now, too.

 

fpn_1465330536__hwabutton.jpg

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Don't they have a few different types of Osmiroid sets? I think what Bo is talking about is a Calligraphy set. The one I purchased is a Drawing set. Is there a difference?

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Ernst Bitterman

A quick squint at the picture; you've got a Copperplate point (flex practice without terror, very nice) and an assortment of Rola-tips. The Rolas are what Osmiroid offered for standard writing, so they're certainly intended for regular use, but that doesn't cure the general feed resistance I have trouble with.

 

I'll also mention that the "rola-tip" is descriptive of the tipping; it's just made up of the steel of the point, rolled under like a cinnamon bun. Cheap, and works well enough, but it does wear rather faster than the more expensive sorts of tipping.

 

...gosh, it sounds like I'm really down on Osmiroids, doesn't it? I'm not, though; I'm a fan without illusions, I guess. I'd be pretty happy to get half those points at that price.

Edited by Ernst Bitterman

Ravensmarch Pens & Books
It's mainly pens, just now....

Oh, good heavens. He's got a blog now, too.

 

fpn_1465330536__hwabutton.jpg

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A quick squint at the picture; you've got a Copperplate point (flex practice without terror, very nice) and an assortment of Rola-tips. The Rolas are what Osmiroid offered for standard writing, so they're certainly intended for regular use, but that doesn't cure the general feed resistance I have trouble with.

 

I'll also mention that the "rola-tip" is descriptive of the tipping; it's just made up of the steel of the point, rolled under like a cinnamon bun. Cheap, and works well enough, but it does wear rather faster than the more expensive sorts of tipping.

 

...gosh, it sounds like I'm really down on Osmiroids, doesn't it? I'm not, though; I'm a fan without illusions, I guess. I'd be pretty happy to get half those points at that price.

 

That is actually very good information - Thanks. I do not like blind fanboys - I guess I am just a fan of fans without illusions....

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I used an Osmiroid 75 through my school days in the 60's. Great little pen with medium straight italic nib. In fact I still have it, and it works, although I dont use it, would hate to lose it.

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I received this set today (seller had initially sent the wrong item by mistake - now I got the real one). It is fantastic. Quite different from the Osmiroid Calligraphy set described often. The pen is super clean (not an iota of ink could be flushed out) and the sac works very well. It came fitted with a sketch nib (described here http://www.fountainp...writing-sample/). This nib is very flexible - way more than my eversharps or mabbie todd swans - however I do NOT know how to do flex writing. It is very wet and surprisingly smooth when flexed. It is a little bit rough when not flexed and I do not think I am going to use it for regular writing.

I have not used/inspected the other nibs yet - but they look completely unused - if they were inked the white feed material would have been stained like the one that is fitted. There is a copperplate nib and a hard fine nib - rest are super flexy and none of them seem to be stubs. Some of them have the word rola on it - what does that mean - rolled tip with no iridium? Are these gold nibs? If not how do they make still nibs that flexy? Unfortunately I would not have much use for this set unless I learn calligraphy, sketching or flex writing. :) But i am not complaining at $26.00

 

Here are the nibs;

1. Flex Sketch Nib

2. Flex Coperplate Nib

3. Rola Hard Fine

4. Rola Hard Medium

5. Rola Soft Fine

6. Soft Medium

7. Rola Extra Fine Soft.

 

 

 

edit: oh the pen is a lever filler 65

 

This is the exact set that I got http://www.leighreyes.com/?p=2705

Edited by smodak
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The flex sketch nib is a gem. I've been using them for years in my fav. drawing pens.

 

Cheers

How can you tell when you're out of invisible ink?

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Thank you, I find I now need the set you have. :headsmack:

 

My wish list is so big I use a Sequoia as a Christmas tree.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

RIP...200's once great nib, now a double ball.:crybaby::wallbash:

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 

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Ernst Bitterman

Sketch point = lucky! Good for drawing, and rather less frustrating to learn flex writing with than the Copperplate.

 

...rolled tip with no iridium? Are these gold nibs? If not how do they make still nibs that flexy?

 

Yep to the first; no, just plated to the second; to the third, steel can also flex, if made just so:

 

http://dirck.delint.ca/beta/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/flexpnt.jpg

Ravensmarch Pens & Books
It's mainly pens, just now....

Oh, good heavens. He's got a blog now, too.

 

fpn_1465330536__hwabutton.jpg

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The flex sketch nib is a gem. I've been using them for years in my fav. drawing pens.

 

Cheers

 

I have the Osmiroid 65 Drawing set and as an artist I love the sketch nib, but I would love to put this nib into a more modern fountain pen (one with a larger easy to fill convertor type). What pens did you retrofit yours to, if I may ask. Thx.

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(one with a larger easy to fill convertor ??????

 

The size 16 sac holds much more than any converter.

 

Holds as much or more than most cartridges (Is my feeling, I don't have any ink volume chart for a size 16 sac.)

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

RIP...200's once great nib, now a double ball.:crybaby::wallbash:

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 

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donnamcm

 

you can try an Osmiroid 75 wich is a piston filler, and i suppose it has a bigger capacity than an 65, or you can look at esterbrooks, i know the J takes the osmiroid nob, maybe there are other esterbrookst tha take the nib also.

 

cheers,

 

Adam

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(one with a larger easy to fill convertor ??????

 

The size 16 sac holds much more than any converter.

 

Holds as much or more than most cartridges (Is my feeling, I don't have any ink volume chart for a size 16 sac.)

 

I don't know what a size 16 sac is, but will google for it. Well, this is my first and only fountain pen with a lever and rubber sac. The sac is only 1.5" long and doesn't seem to hold hardly any ink. Maybe I am not filling it properly. I hold the lever down with nib immersed and then release it. I have tried that and also like "pumping" the lever. When I think it is full, i held the lever open over the bottle of ink and like only a small amount of ink came out, so I don't think there is hardly any ink going in it. I also did a simple little drawing and it was out of ink. I draw a LOT so this is not a good reservoir for me, but I love the nib! Thank you for any tips on getting ink into the sac and appreciate your time.

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donnamcm

 

you can try an Osmiroid 75 wich is a piston filler, and i suppose it has a bigger capacity than an 65, or you can look at esterbrooks, i know the J takes the osmiroid nob, maybe there are other esterbrookst tha take the nib also.

 

cheers,

 

Adam

 

Thank you, I'll look for the 75 perhaps or learn how to fill the 65 properly :).

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(one with a larger easy to fill convertor ??????

 

The size 16 sac holds much more than any converter.

 

Holds as much or more than most cartridges (Is my feeling, I don't have any ink volume chart for a size 16 sac.)

 

I don't know what a size 16 sac is, but will google for it. Well, this is my first and only fountain pen with a lever and rubber sac. The sac is only 1.5" long and doesn't seem to hold hardly any ink. Maybe I am not filling it properly. I hold the lever down with nib immersed and then release it. I have tried that and also like "pumping" the lever. When I think it is full, i held the lever open over the bottle of ink and like only a small amount of ink came out, so I don't think there is hardly any ink going in it. I also did a simple little drawing and it was out of ink. I draw a LOT so this is not a good reservoir for me, but I love the nib! Thank you for any tips on getting ink into the sac and appreciate your time.

 

Perhaps the pen needs to be restored with a new Sac - mine fills perfectly and sucks up a ton of ink.

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(one with a larger easy to fill convertor ??????

 

The size 16 sac holds much more than any converter.

 

Holds as much or more than most cartridges (Is my feeling, I don't have any ink volume chart for a size 16 sac.)

 

I don't know what a size 16 sac is, but will google for it. Well, this is my first and only fountain pen with a lever and rubber sac. The sac is only 1.5" long and doesn't seem to hold hardly any ink. Maybe I am not filling it properly. I hold the lever down with nib immersed and then release it. I have tried that and also like "pumping" the lever. When I think it is full, i held the lever open over the bottle of ink and like only a small amount of ink came out, so I don't think there is hardly any ink going in it. I also did a simple little drawing and it was out of ink. I draw a LOT so this is not a good reservoir for me, but I love the nib! Thank you for any tips on getting ink into the sac and appreciate your time.

 

Perhaps the pen needs to be restored with a new Sac - mine fills perfectly and sucks up a ton of ink.

 

Yes perhaps that is it. A friend gave me this drawing set and it appeared that it had never been used. Sac was soft and pliable, but since it is 40+ years old, it probably does need to be replaced. I will try that. Thx.

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