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To Shake Or Not To Shake



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It was mentioned in another thread that ink last forever, but sometimes a sediment may develop. Is is best to move the bottle as little as possible so as not to disturb any sediment in the bottom of the bottle? Or do you recommend shaking all bottles of ink periodically to keep sediment from forming?

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Twsbi - Noodler's North African Violet-----Lamy Vista - Noodler's Marine Green

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I know that some here do shake the bottle but if I see sediment, I pour off the rest of the ink into a glass, rinse the sediment out of the bottle, dry the bottle, and pour the clear ink back in. I prefer to avoid those particles going through my pen.

Happiness is a real Montblanc...

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When you reach my age, shaking is no longer optional.

When you're good at it, it's really miserable.

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When you reach my age, shaking is no longer optional.

 

 

:roflmho:

Sheaffer Targa - Parker Penman Sapphire----- Luoshi - Silk Road Green

Twsbi - Noodler's North African Violet-----Lamy Vista - Noodler's Marine Green

WTB Lamy Terracotta and Savannah, Sweden LE, Japan LE

http://i226.photobucket.com/albums/dd273/BrownEyedGirl248/Avatars/InkDrop.jpgMember since 1-28-11

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Philosophy Student

everytime i fill a pen i tip it upside down a few times to mix it up. So I dont get those bubbles (ha although my noodlers OMB gets brutal bubbles) and the ink mixes. I remember seeing something about noodlers black performing differently and looking blacker after a shake, so i always do it.

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I don't shake. When I go to fill, I will gently tip the bottle back and forth a couple of times. If it's only been sitting days or weeks, no need to shake. i don't think there's any hard and fast rule or any harm in doing one or the other. (agitating or not agitating in some form or fashion).

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I shake.

 

I know some people are worried about sediment clogging the pen, but has anyone actually seen this happen? I have never experienced it.

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Don't shake the bottle. The sediment can only do your pen harm so you don't want any sediment sucked into the pen. If the sediment is bad I throw the ink bottle, it's just not worth the risk.

Edited by plunksna
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When you reach my age, shaking is no longer optional.

 

You make the most wonderful posts! I'm still laughing! :thumbup:

 

I give the bottle a thorough agitation and let it sit a minute or three before filling (to let the bubbles settle).

 

Bubbles are the downside. Fortunately they are temporary, and rise to the top, so if you are a "pipetter" like me, you can suck below the bubbles if you are in a hurry, and carefully transfer to a vial without introducing more bubbles.

 

If you are a non-shaker (and you know who you are.....**cough** kcat ***cough***), you are giving up color vibrancy and consistency, that shaking will restore.

 

Don't shake the bottle. The sediment can only do your pen harm so you don't want any sediment sucked into the pen. If the sediment is bad I throw the ink bottle, it's just not worth the risk.

 

Each of us have our methods and opinions--and should be respected, and you are not the only one with this viewpoint.

 

I have a different opinion, and is based upon seeing sedimentation in many top brand names which have not been known to cause pen clogging problems, some of which I photographed here.

 

For me, the more sensible approach is to evaluate how rapidly a dye sediment develops, and compare that to your pen use/flushing habits. If you let a pen sit for two months, then you may not wish to use any of the examples I showed. However, there are many others that I did not take the time to photograph.

With the new FPN rules, now I REALLY don't know what to put in my signature.

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I consider two things.

 

First, what happen in the bottle can happen in the pen.

 

Second, why did sediment form? Sediment can typically develop three ways: contamination, over-saturation, or oxidation. If contamination, I don't want that ink. If it's over-saturated, it could just as easily cause trouble in your pen. If oxidation, then the ink isn't want it used to be.

 

I don't shake. I discard inks that need to be shaken.

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I consider two things.

 

First, what happen in the bottle can happen in the pen.

 

Second, why did sediment form? Sediment can typically develop three ways: contamination, over-saturation, or oxidation. If contamination, I don't want that ink. If it's over-saturated, it could just as easily cause trouble in your pen. If oxidation, then the ink isn't want it used to be.

 

I don't shake. I discard inks that need to be shaken.

 

Again, all sensible thoughts that are a totally legitimate strategy. Let me tease apart one aspect of what you said, if you don't mind....and meant in a friendly way--for the benefit of others.

 

I agree with your First--what happens in the bottle can happen in the pen. The question is at what time frames would each happen.

 

I agree with most of your second categories, certainly contamination and possibly oxidation--but that is hard to be sure that is the cause. I'm also thinking there may be other etiologies, such as heat/cold/chemical component changes developing slowly over longer time time(many months/years)--and thereby causing unexpected interactions and sediment.

 

Here are more fine points for people to consider in that category of oversaturation....again based upon the photos linked in my previous post of many reputable brand names that have not been known to give general users a cause for concern. Everyone is free to make their own decisions, this is just my "food for thought," before people make up their minds.

 

If the sediment is formed from an over-saturated/high concentration of dye, it could cause trouble in your pen...BUT...what is worth qualifying is the rate at which the highly saturated dye sediment forms.

 

Some of the J. Herbin inks that I photographed, had sat undisturbed for 8-10 months at room temp, in their boxes, inside of a cabinet. In my humble opinion, if it takes more than 3-4 weeks without agitation for the sediment to form, it is unlikely to develop in your pen...unless you fill and let it sit for a month undisturbed. That would be considered as a horrible pen hygiene habit.

 

Then there is the issue of the amount of sediment that develops over time. An ink that has a barely noticeable trace sediment after 5-6 months, and very quickly goes away with brief inverting or a couple shakes, and does not return when observed for another 2 months--does not represent the same level of concern as a bottle that develops a 2-3mm thick layer, and/or goes away only with vigorous, prolonged shaking, but then returns again in 5 days.

With the new FPN rules, now I REALLY don't know what to put in my signature.

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There are good arguments for both. My preference is for shaking, and I've been doing that most of my life without any problem. Other than habit, my main reason for shaking is to evenly distribute any "sediment" and/or color separation.

 

I open the bottle first to have a look-see, checking to make sure there is no mold growth on the top before closing it up and giving it a shake. (One day last summer that extra precaution paid off, so I do that part with renewed vigilance.) I've never understood the idea of wanting to keep sediment or any heavier matter at the bottom of the bottle, since that is exactly where the tip of my nib goes in order to suck up the ink. Unless you're filling modern converters, I see no way of getting around the dunking of the nib for piston, lever, or button fillers. Other than the taller Noodler's or Aurora bottles, most ink bottles are short. In order to get the entire nib submerged in ink, the nib ends up at, or near, the bottom of the ink bottle. I prefer not pulling in a possible heavy load of sediment or uneven color, and so I make sure I've shaken the ink first.

 

Honestly, you'll find as many people who believe in shaking as who believe in not shaking. We all seem to be doing fine with our techniques, so it's probably not a big issue either way. Do what makes sense to you.

Edited by Rena
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All paints and dyes that I am familiar with tell you to mix thoroughly before use. It only makes sense to me that pen ink would be no different.

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Many of my Noodler's inks settle out and are the wrong color if not re-mixed. A few inversions of the bottle is all that is usually required, although it can take a while in a very full bottle to re-suspend the dye. This is due to the nature of the dyes, and is only something I do with the Bulletproofs and semibulletproofs. The "standard" inks I just fill after a swirl or too (a habit from the chemistry lab, I always mix things before use there, every time).

 

Most other inks do not need to be mixed, and if a precipitate forms I leave it on the bottom.

 

Peter

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Most other inks do not need to be mixed, and if a precipitate forms I leave it on the bottom.

 

Peter

 

Thanks for the reassurance. I just found a precipitate in my New Rose mix, but it doesn't seem to be spreading through the ink, just sitting quietly on the bottom of the bottle.

Let there be light. Then let there be a cat, a cocktail, and a good book.

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Many of my Noodler's inks settle out and are the wrong color if not re-mixed. A few inversions of the bottle is all that is usually required, although it can take a while in a very full bottle to re-suspend the dye. This is due to the nature of the dyes, and is only something I do with the Bulletproofs and semibulletproofs..

 

I've had a similar experience with the bulletrpoof and eternal inks. Most of them settle, some more than others. Eternal brown was particularly bad. The last bottle I bought already had sediment caked heavily in the bottom when I got it, and was quite weak when I first tested it. I had to shake it vigorously for about ten minutes to dissolve the stuff. Most of them aren't nearly that bad (very little with Violet Vote for example), but it's worth checking. If the sediment is visible in the bottom of the bottle it needs to be shaken!

 

As far as I can tell, my more conventional (i.e. not cellulose-reactive) Noodler's inks haven't developed sediment.

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