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Pel Nib Removal And Un-removal


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Got asked earlier about putting a nib/feed back into a pen, in this case, a pelikan collar. Hope this is clear. If not please chime in and add details I left out to help out.

Thanks

 

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4145/5205381667_6b18a06d2e_b.jpg

pelnib by watch_art, on Flickr

 

http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5045/5205381893_bdb8daeba7_b.jpg

pelnib2 by watch_art, on Flickr

 

 

What you do though, is take the nib unit out of the pen, put it on the knock out block, and carefully hammer it out. I use a soft rubber block and a cut down kabob stick (for grilling shish-ka-bobs). The rubber block was bought at walmart with a black and deckar hammer drillbit set. You'll want this little short block ontop of something taller so you don't hammer your nib or feed into the table. That would be bad.

 

Once it's out, pinch the nib and feed together the way they need to go, your thumb on top of the nib and your pointer finger wrapped around the feed, and carefully shove the cr@p out of it back into the little collar. Be careful. You might have to shove hard, you might not. Either way, be really careful. But no, you don't knock it back in. Some pens, like vintage Sheaffers, are a serious pain in the arse to get back in sometimes. I've had to push some nibs into wood to get them seated. That doesn't sound right, but if you've seen some of those nib blocks by parker or whoever, you'd know what i mean. I have two block of two by four screwed together (for a table, not for this) and I shove the pen into the crack, perpendicular to the space in the wood, and push it in, applying pressure on the wings of the nib. Works great.

 

And notice the notches on the side of the collar before you take the nib out. Make a little drawing showing how the nib/feed need to be aligned with the collar. That way you can put it back in the right way. Most pen sections have a little raised spot for the nib to fit into so you can't stick the nib/feed in there anyway you please. Some pens don't have that. I THINK, don't remember for sure, that the Pelikan is like this. When you take yours apart, look at it. The hole will either be nice and round or sort of oblong.

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Nice drawing!

 

If I could just add --

 

1. This refers to vintage Pelikan nibs with the hard rubber collars, right?

 

2. It really helps to heat the collar before you knock the nib out, and before you push the nib and feed back in. The collar expands a little so it's easier to shove the nib and feed back in, and heat also reduces the risk of the collar cracking.

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The guy knocking it out is hilarious.

http://img356.imageshack.us/img356/8703/letterminizk9.png

 

http://img356.imageshack.us/img356/7260/postminipo0.png

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I really wish I had your drawing skills, seriously. I've always been textual, and wish I could draw. Desire is there, but not skill. Maybe when I retire I'll set a limit, and require myself to draw what I think rather than express it in words. Rejoice that you can draw naturally and easily. It's a great gift.

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The guy knocking it out is hilarious.

 

Thanks! That's Charlie. He had his own comic books back in the 8th grade. He was pretty obnoxious.

 

I really wish I had your drawing skills, seriously. I've always been textual, and wish I could draw. Desire is there, but not skill. Maybe when I retire I'll set a limit, and require myself to draw what I think rather than express it in words. Rejoice that you can draw naturally and easily. It's a great gift.

 

Thanks a lot! It's always been harder for me to put thoughts into words. If you want to start drawing, I recommend blind contours. Once you are more comfortable "seeing", you'll get MUCH better at drawing.

 

Great illustrations! I think this can be easily included, without any alterations, in the next version of Oldfield's book. :lol:

 

Hopefully I'll get a copy gratis. :roflmho: I haven't seen it though, are there lots of rough illustrations in it?

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The guy knocking it out is hilarious.

 

Yes, I realize now that having the proper, determined

expression on one's countenance during pen surgery,

is important, too. Thank you all.

 

:eureka: :mad: :vbg:

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  • 5 years later...

Here is what I used:

 

 

 

It works. Lego is your friend. I used it to take out the nib of a vintage 120 unit. The nib was wiggling and the pen had flow related problems, IMO because of that. Since the feed is in ebonite I did heat the unit in hot water.

 

Shawn's explanations were very useful, thanks!

 

The 120 was my late mother's and she did write with it every day for the last 50 years or so. The steel nib is beginning to suffer from the ink exposure, event if my mother only used Waterman Florida blue.

 

Now I have fitted the unit with a flex Waterman Ideal #2... :-D

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free 70 pages graphic novel. Enjoy!

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  • 2 weeks later...

Here is what I used:

 

attachicon.gifIMG_20160418_192525.jpg

 

It works. Lego is your friend. I used it to take out the nib of a vintage 120 unit. The nib was wiggling and the pen had flow related problems, IMO because of that. Since the feed is in ebonite I did heat the unit in hot water.

 

Shawn's explanations were very useful, thanks!

 

The 120 was my late mother's and she did write with it every day for the last 50 years or so. The steel nib is beginning to suffer from the ink exposure, event if my mother only used Waterman Florida blue.

 

Now I have fitted the unit with a flex Waterman Ideal #2... :-D

Did your pen have the Hard Rubber Ring? If so how did you deal with it?

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Got asked earlier about putting a nib/feed back into a pen, in this case, a pelikan collar. Hope this is clear. If not please chime in and add details I left out to help out.

Thanks

 

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4145/5205381667_6b18a06d2e_b.jpg

pelnib by watch_art, on Flickr

 

http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5045/5205381893_bdb8daeba7_b.jpg

pelnib2 by watch_art, on Flickr

 

 

What you do though, is take the nib unit out of the pen, put it on the knock out block, and carefully hammer it out. I use a soft rubber block and a cut down kabob stick (for grilling shish-ka-bobs). The rubber block was bought at walmart with a black and deckar hammer drillbit set. You'll want this little short block ontop of something taller so you don't hammer your nib or feed into the table. That would be bad.

 

Once it's out, pinch the nib and feed together the way they need to go, your thumb on top of the nib and your pointer finger wrapped around the feed, and carefully shove the cr@p out of it back into the little collar. Be careful. You might have to shove hard, you might not. Either way, be really careful. But no, you don't knock it back in. Some pens, like vintage Sheaffers, are a serious pain in the arse to get back in sometimes. I've had to push some nibs into wood to get them seated. That doesn't sound right, but if you've seen some of those nib blocks by parker or whoever, you'd know what i mean. I have two block of two by four screwed together (for a table, not for this) and I shove the pen into the crack, perpendicular to the space in the wood, and push it in, applying pressure on the wings of the nib. Works great.

 

And notice the notches on the side of the collar before you take the nib out. Make a little drawing showing how the nib/feed need to be aligned with the collar. That way you can put it back in the right way. Most pen sections have a little raised spot for the nib to fit into so you can't stick the nib/feed in there anyway you please. Some pens don't have that. I THINK, don't remember for sure, that the Pelikan is like this. When you take yours apart, look at it. The hole will either be nice and round or sort of oblong.

 

Shawn, I have one of these Pens, I believe it's a 120 or a 140 with the Ring....And I need to reset the nib for the flow. Right now if I write gently no ink comes out....However, If I apply a good amount of pressure, which I should not have to do, the pen writes very nicly. So in my opinion I need to reset the nib. 2 Things are at issue; What do I do with that Hard Rubber Ring? and 2) Which way do I go with the nib? Do I move it up or down given how it is writing as I noted??

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I think the tines are too tight. I would adjust the nib slit, not the depth the nib is set in the collar. If you set it out too far you could also cause it to rub in the cap, or bend it.

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  • 5 months later...

Thank you. This is something I've always wondered about. You made it very clear.

I love your drawings.

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I feel kind of bad for the little stick figure. His arms seem to be growing out of his head. :lol: Great tutorial!

There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy. Hamlet, 1.5.167-168

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  • 2 years later...

Got asked earlier about putting a nib/feed back into a pen, in this case, a pelikan collar. Hope this is clear. If not please chime in and add details I left out to help out.

Thanks

 

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4145/5205381667_6b18a06d2e_b.jpg

pelnib by watch_art, on Flickr

 

http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5045/5205381893_bdb8daeba7_b.jpg

pelnib2 by watch_art, on Flickr

 

 

What you do though, is take the nib unit out of the pen, put it on the knock out block, and carefully hammer it out. I use a soft rubber block and a cut down kabob stick (for grilling shish-ka-bobs). The rubber block was bought at walmart with a black and deckar hammer drillbit set. You'll want this little short block ontop of something taller so you don't hammer your nib or feed into the table. That would be bad.

 

Once it's out, pinch the nib and feed together the way they need to go, your thumb on top of the nib and your pointer finger wrapped around the feed, and carefully shove the cr@p out of it back into the little collar. Be careful. You might have to shove hard, you might not. Either way, be really careful. But no, you don't knock it back in. Some pens, like vintage Sheaffers, are a serious pain in the arse to get back in sometimes. I've had to push some nibs into wood to get them seated. That doesn't sound right, but if you've seen some of those nib blocks by parker or whoever, you'd know what i mean. I have two block of two by four screwed together (for a table, not for this) and I shove the pen into the crack, perpendicular to the space in the wood, and push it in, applying pressure on the wings of the nib. Works great.

 

And notice the notches on the side of the collar before you take the nib out. Make a little drawing showing how the nib/feed need to be aligned with the collar. That way you can put it back in the right way. Most pen sections have a little raised spot for the nib to fit into so you can't stick the nib/feed in there anyway you please. Some pens don't have that. I THINK, don't remember for sure, that the Pelikan is like this. When you take yours apart, look at it. The hole will either be nice and round or sort of oblong.

Excellent illustration. This is what I've been looking for my question "How to replace a vintage Pelikan nib?" Thank you for your great job, watch_art!

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I would only suggest a bit of flushing/soaking prior to the knock out phase. Some of those inks behave like good quality adhesives. Heaven help you if somone used India ink in the pen, that stuff even bonds effectively to polished gold (I ran accross this recently in an eBay pen).

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