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Pelikan Edelstein Topaz



Sandy1

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Please take a moment to adjust your monitor to accurately depict the Gray Scale linked below.

As the patches are neutral gray, their colour on your monitor should also be neutral gray.

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=|-|=

 

Figure 1.

Swabs & Swatch

Paper: HPJ1124 24 lb. Laser Copy.

http://i783.photobucket.com/albums/yy116/Sandy1-1/InkyThoughts2010/Ink%20Review%20-%20Pelikan%20Edelstein%20Topaz/5b80b02c.jpg

Figure 2.

NIB-ism ✑

Paper: HPJ1124.

http://i783.photobucket.com/albums/yy116/Sandy1-1/InkyThoughts2010/Ink%20Review%20-%20Pelikan%20Edelstein%20Topaz/cf066de5.jpg

Depicts nibs' line-width and pens' relative wetness.

L → R: Sumiko, Eversharp, 330, M200, Phileas & Estie.

WRITTEN SAMPLES - Moby Dick

 

Row Height is 8mm.

 

Figure 3.

Paper: HPJ1124.

http://i783.photobucket.com/albums/yy116/Sandy1-1/InkyThoughts2010/Ink%20Review%20-%20Pelikan%20Edelstein%20Topaz/699c6182.jpg

Figure 4.

Paper: Rhodia.

http://i783.photobucket.com/albums/yy116/Sandy1-1/InkyThoughts2010/Ink%20Review%20-%20Pelikan%20Edelstein%20Topaz/a97c0a4c.jpg

Figure 5.

Paper: G Lalo, Verge de France, white.

http://i783.photobucket.com/albums/yy116/Sandy1-1/InkyThoughts2010/Ink%20Review%20-%20Pelikan%20Edelstein%20Topaz/03f69744.jpg

Figure 6.

Paper: Royal, 25% rag.

http://i783.photobucket.com/albums/yy116/Sandy1-1/InkyThoughts2010/Ink%20Review%20-%20Pelikan%20Edelstein%20Topaz/d4678b08.jpg

Figure 7.

Grocery List

Paper: Pulp. One-a-Day calendar page.

http://i783.photobucket.com/albums/yy116/Sandy1-1/InkyThoughts2010/Ink%20Review%20-%20Pelikan%20Edelstein%20Topaz/33358cc1.jpg

OTHER SAMPLES

 

Figure 8.

  • 'HAPPY!' on Glossy Card.
  • Smear/Dry Time on Glossy Paper.
  • Smear/Dry Time on HPJ1124.
  • Wet Tests on HPJ1124.

http://i783.photobucket.com/albums/yy116/Sandy1-1/InkyThoughts2010/Ink%20Review%20-%20Pelikan%20Edelstein%20Topaz/9afe29a1.jpg

GENERAL DESCRIPTION

 

Type:

  • Dye-based fountain pen ink.

Daily writer?

  • Very possible.

A go-to ink?

  • Yes.

USE

 

Business:

  • Balances astride the Blue - Turquoise gap with aplomb.
  • PET has just enough gravitas for the Conference Room and most peer-to-peer external correspondence, yet sufficiently convivial for internal correspondence.
  • It does not project power or authority; rather PET projects energy, clarity and openness. Consequently, Topaz is excellent for peer-to-peer and upward correspondence. (This is Ms Bl-Bk speaking.)
  • PET does not have sufficient zip to be used for mark-up, editing, etc.
  • Of little use for error correction or grading of assignments.

Illustrations / Graphics:

  • A poor choice as a gradient between Dark and Light Blue.
  • A good choice for a transitional colour between Blue and aqua / dark cyan.
  • In wet narrow nibs it has good saturation, so should be suitable for narrow lines on hard paper, crosshatching, etc.
  • The reasonably low smear/dry time allows prompt reworking.

Students:

  • Certainly.
  • PET performed well above average on the highly absorbent Royal and Pulp, so may do well on low-cost papers: no feathering or woolly lines.
  • Quite robust; what is written should shrug off domestic mishaps.
  • A very good choice for hand-written assignments.

Personal:

  • Quite a nice pick.
  • This is an easy-reading ink, fleet of foot, which may appeal to those who write tomes, and would like them to be read in their entirety.
  • PET is clear and without artifice, yet there are subtle nuances.
  • For pro forma business writing, PET will certainly do the necessary, but it may be too nice for such use.
  • I have tried a range of various nib sizes and shapes with PET. So far, I prefer mono-line nibs, (I am soooo boring), yet the shaped nibs do nicely. I could easily see using a nib wider than 1.0mm to splash about oodles of PET.

PHYSICAL PERFORMANCE & CHARACTERISTICS

 

Flow Rate:

  • Just on the dry side of average.

Nib Dry-out:

  • Not apparent.

Start-up:

  • Immediate.

Lubrication:

  • Quite good.
  • The narrow nibs ran well on the hard textured G Lalo.
  • The pens never became slippery, and the wider nibs remained surefooted.

Nib Creeping:

  • None.

Staining:

  • None after 3 days.

Clogging:

  • Not seen.
  • Seems unlikely.

Bleed Through:

  • No.

Show Through:

  • No.
  • Both sides of the page may be used.

Feathering / Woolly Line:

  • No.

Smear/Dry Time:

  • Glossy: 2 - 5 seconds
  • HPJ1124: 10 - 12 seconds.

Water Resistance: ☂

  • 4:
    • All legible, can be easily read and/or have light staining from re-deposit of soluble ink.
    • Use as-is for work papers & internal use.
    • Adjustments to a scanner may drop-out the stain.

Smell:

  • Faint; rounded esters.
  • Reminiscent of fresh raspberries. (?)

Hand oil sensitivity:

  • Not noticed.

Archival:

  • Specifically denied by Pelikan.

Clean Up:

  • About average speed; very thorough with plain water.

Mixing:

  • No stated prohibitions.
  • Mixing is likely to disrupt the balance of PET.
  • Should mixing be attempted, if one hears that little 'thlllk' from behind, it may be the fire selector going from full auto to mayhem.

Note: No problems with show- bleed-through, feathering or woolly lines were seen on Staples' eco-friendly white 20 lb bond, Item 813903.

 

THE LOOK

 

Presence:

  • Alert.
  • Attentive.
  • Latent high torque.
  • Reminiscent of going from swimming laps to swimming in open water.

Saturation:

  • Modest.

Shading:

  • Can be generated on smooth papers using a range of nibs - not only the wider & shaped nibs.
  • When shading appears, it is exquisite. ♡

Variance depending on pen+nib combos used:

  • No more than expected, given the range of writers.

High Resolution Scans:

FIDELITY

 

Is the name appropriate?

  • Fiction.

Are swatches accurate?

  • The only swatch is on the box, which is reasonable.

SIMILAR COLOURS

 

Figure 9.

http://i783.photobucket.com/albums/yy116/Sandy1-1/InkyThoughts2010/Ink%20Review%20-%20Pelikan%20Edelstein%20Topaz/db8f5199.jpg

We have five 3-stage swabs; from top to bottom:

  1. Private Reserve Tropical Blue
  2. Pelikan Edelstein Topaz
  3. Private Reserve American Blue
  4. Pelikan Edelstein Topaz
  5. Diamine Kensington Blue.

Note: There is also a passing similarity to Waterman South Sea_ Blue, (hence Diamine Havasue Turquoise), but when ink-on-paper samples are viewed in person, the lack of similarity becomes obvious.

  • Waterman, South Sea_ Blue My link
  • Diamine, Havasu Turquoise My link
  • Comparison : Waterman, South Sea_ Blue :: Diamine, Havasu Turquoise My link

PAPERS

 

Lovely papers:

  • Crisp white paper.
  • Can handle papers with optical brighteners.

Trip-wire Papers:

  • ☠ Avoid combos of dry writers + hard papers. e.g. Figure 5 - Estie onto G Lalo.
  • Can't think of any within reason.

Tinted Papers:

  • Could work well on any sensible tint, especially from a wet-ish writer.

PrePrinted Paper:

  • As much as I'd like to use-up the Lamy Green, PET will do just fine on pre-printed paper.
  • On forms it will separate just enough from the [black] text.
  • For typical grids, etc., PET may not be the best pick - perhaps due to the typical colour of ruling / grid lines. (?) Consequently, one may well use WhiteLines with confidence.

Is high-end paper 'worth it'?

  • If one prefers shading, then smooth surface harder papers, such as Rhodia & Clairefontaine Triomphe, will not disappoint.
  • Otherwise, more a matter of preference over performance - the penny-a-page HPJ1124 was very suitable.

OTHER THAN INK

 

Presentation:

  • 50ml bottle in a box.
  • No HazMat warnings.

Container:

  • A clear heavy glass bottle.
  • 75x40xcapped height of 65mm
  • The centred round opening is an accommodating 22mm∅.
  • The single tank is shallow; the bottle has no filling aids, no sediment collector, no etc. 3xTsk. (Gad Zooks man! Not even as functional as the 4001-series desk-top bottles!! Pelikan forgot to bring their 'A' game when doing this bottle. Eine Gruppe Dummköpfe, das nicht Füllfederhalter benutzen!)
  • There is no label, rather a dog's dinner of four typefaces in two colours printed directly on the bottle.
  • While bottle labelling is an unsightly debacle, the ink level can be readily determined, so over-immersion / dunking of one's pen may be avoided. Hoorah! Snorkies rejoice! (Their owners too.)
  • The hard plastic screw cap has more than adequate grippy bits; and at 15mm is a good height for ease of use.
  • The cap seal appears to be a sort of plastic foam.
  • The cap is not child-proof.

Box:

  • Constructed of coated hefty card-stock.
  • 80x45x75mm
  • Includes a fairly accurate swatch.

Eco-Green:

  • Except for the wasteful foam padding, the bottle, cap & box are recyclable / benign.

Availability:

  • High street stationers, back street pen shops, online retailers.
  • Note: While the Pelikan 4001 series inks can often be found in art / craft shops, I have yet to see Edelstein inks in such shops.

ETC.

 

Majik:

  • I think that PET has the potential to be conjured.

Personal Pen & Paper Pick:

  • Only one?? The M200 on the Rhodia.

Yickity Yackity:

  • Classy but not yet a classic.
  • Pelikan knows a thing or three about ink, which is apparent in the writing experience and on the page.
  • Those who choose ink by colour alone may be disappointed that PET is not a 'new' colour, but the rock solid performance profile, very satisfying writing experience and reasonable malleability elevate Edelstein Topaz well above pretenders.
  • Ah kushbaby, perhaps not up your alley, but give it a fair go. (At least a large sample, yes?)

{=*=}{=v=}{=*=}~{=*=}{=-|+|-=}{=*=}~{=*=}{=v=}{=*=}

 

MATERIEL USED

 

To be relevant to most members, I make an effort to use papers, pens & nibs that are readily available. For pens, I use those for which I paid $100 or less, new or used; and are factory stock - not customised.

 

Pens:

  • Sailor Sumiko + TIGP F nib.
  • Eversharp Skyline + 14K F nib.
  • Sheaffer 330 + steel M nib.
  • Pelikan M200 + g-p M200-series M nib.
  • Waterman Phileas + steel B nib.
  • Esterbrook J + steel 9284 firm signature stub nib.

  • For lines & labels:
    • Pilot 78G+F nib with Noodler's Lexington Grey.

On these papers:

  • HPJ1124 24 lb. Laser Copy.
  • Rhodia.
  • G Lalo, Verge de France, white.
  • Royal, 25% cotton rag.
  • Pulp.
  • Glossy paper.
  • Glossy card.

_________________

 

IMAGES

  • Scans were made on an Epson V600 scanner; factory defaults were accepted.
  • Scanning resolution was either 96 dpi or 300 dpi; at 24 bit colour.
  • As required, scans were cropped and straightened using iPhoto; no other changes were made.

_________________

 

DENSITOMETER READINGS (FWTW)

  • Red 85
  • Grn 149
  • Blu 224
  • Lum 151

===============

 

-30-



The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.

 

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Great review of a very nice ink! If you're at all considering this one, at least try a sample. I like this one a lot!

Music, verily, is the mediator between intellectual and sensuous life, the one incorporeal entrance into the high world of knowledge which comprehends mankind but which mankind cannot comprehend. -Ludwig van Beethoven

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Great review of a very nice ink! If you're at all considering this one, at least try a sample. I like this one a lot!

Hi,

 

I'm glad you enjoyed the review.

 

I think PET will come into its own over time. Especially when pots of similar inks start to run dry, the wily practitioner will likely go for the PET experience and performance profile. Line quality and water resistance would have many changing on the spot - using the dregs of the WSSBl, DWESKBl & similar inks to dye Easter eggs / tint water in vases of cut flowers.

 

I do wonder if Pelikan will eventually market 250ml 'tankers' of PET.

 

Bye,

S1

The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.

 

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  • 3 weeks later...

You know, the thoroughness of your review is amazing (well, the ink's price would also be quite appreciated). That said, upon hearing that a local store here will be carrying Pelikan products soon (I think they already have them ready, just not open to the public as of yet), I immediately hopped on my e-mail and sent a letter to the owner asking if she could bring over these Pely Edelstein inks - they may not be the most original in terms of color, but if asked if the ink is a good one, it certainly looks the part (esp. on the M200)

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Hello,

 

I am glad you appreciate the Review.

 

Ah, the price aspect. I would rather write endlessly about bottle-cap liners than even mention price. Why?

  • Prices change over time.
  • Prices vary due to location. e.g. Noodler's in the USA as opposed to Noodler's in other countries.
  • As a part of the location factor, does one buy it from a local shop, a regional Seller, or from abroad?
  • And from a personal aspect, I choose to use an FP, so I accept the associated costs.
    • The ink I use on duty is a (discontinued) standard Parker ink. (Most of my cache came from countries in the Middle East; and cost about USD1/50ml. - no kidding.)
    • Ink such as PET, or any of my off-duty inks, are used for letters to other people, pro forma household/personal acivities. It is my choice if I want to use PET for grocery lists or only for writing close family and friends. But I use a lot of the 'also ran' inks for miscellaneous tasks / ephemera, and keep the 'good stuff' for writing others ; so when I do that, the ink is a gift, and cost is irrelevant and insignificant - likely far less than the cost of the paper and postage.

    [*]But mostly, I think that talking about the cost of one's pleasures, and (hopefully) the pleasure that brings to others is irrelevant in an Ink Review.

Obviously, I do take your comment seriously. Money is a funny thing, and people have different relationships to money, so I'll just keep to the things that one purchases - the price sticker is not a colour swatch. :happyberet:

 

Bye,

Sandy1

The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.

 

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That is the most comprehensive review I have read. :thumbup:

 

I must try this Blue out. I am currently using PR DC blue and Noodlers BSB. If you have used these I would be interested on your take.

 

Also, a nice grocery list (making me hungry) :roflmho:

 

Regards

 

pelman

http://www.ishafoundation.org/images/stories/inner/ie-logo.gif

 

Inner Engineering Link

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  • 1 year later...

I recently got a bottle of this..very pleased..writes beautifully in my Cenntennial which previously has only ever had Quink Washable blue...

 

I see your point about bottle design...but the ink itself is lovely..as an everyday writer without being "too" business like i like it...it's my journal writer for now :)

 

i find the wetness perfect...miles better than the burgundy mont blanc i recently purchased...which was a dissappointment to me...i'll either swap that or wait till I get the OB Nibbed pen I'm after and try with that..

 

thanks for a fab review

Mk1 Parker Duofold Centennial in Blue Marble + GT, Medium arrow nib + broad italic aces nib.Owned since new.Parker Victory Black + GT, wet medium.Conway Stewart #388 Stub.

Mabie Todd Blackbird,semi Flex Nib.Aurora optima green auroloid Stub.Visconti voyger emerald green Broad. Waterman 92 Fine flex

www.hmshood.com The Official website of the late great HMS Hood

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Wow, this is probably the most thorough ink review I've ever read.

 

I have this ink and just put it in one of my pens and noticed it's extremely close to Pilot Iroshizuku Asa-Gao.

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I got Jade and Topaz and both shade well with regular flex F and more flexible F nibs.

Right now I have Topaz in a nice Osmia 773 semi-flex KM.

 

On the right paper it is fantastic. I just wish I knew what paper company made that great pad of cheap paper over 30 years ago. :crybaby:

I was not going to spend a lot of money on paper back in ball point days.

Six sheets to go. How unfair, it writes well on both sides. :unsure:

 

I find Topaz shades better than Jade.

I definitely will buy Topaz again.

 

They cost €12 or 13 in Germany.

A very pretty bottle that can be used as an inkwell for some other ink.

Edited by Bo Bo Olson

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

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my problem with calling a blue ink topaz is that Topaz isn't blue, they are more a champagne color in reality. The very low quality topaz gems are irradiated (I believe) to turn them blue. There is to my knowledge, no true blue topaz. So it seems kinda phoney for Pelikan to call a blue ink Topaz.

What Would The Flying Spaghetti Monster Do?

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that's being ever so slightly over picky don't you think???

 

lol

 

i actually like the name ...but then i wasn't thinking of it's accuracy at the time...i have to say i don't think i've ever had anything in "topaz" rolleyes.gif

Mk1 Parker Duofold Centennial in Blue Marble + GT, Medium arrow nib + broad italic aces nib.Owned since new.Parker Victory Black + GT, wet medium.Conway Stewart #388 Stub.

Mabie Todd Blackbird,semi Flex Nib.Aurora optima green auroloid Stub.Visconti voyger emerald green Broad. Waterman 92 Fine flex

www.hmshood.com The Official website of the late great HMS Hood

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that's being ever so slightly over picky don't you think???

 

lol

 

i actually like the name ...but then i wasn't thinking of it's accuracy at the time...i have to say i don't think i've ever had anything in "topaz" rolleyes.gif

 

Your probably right but it comes from my background of jewelry making when people would try and sell quartz as Smokey Topaz or Citrine as Topaz. Or even worse, treated inferior turquoise and sold as genuine Morenci, Bisbee, or Cerrillos Turquoise. Drove me nuts explaining to people why my prices were higher than the junk they had just bought off the street.

What Would The Flying Spaghetti Monster Do?

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aha jewlerry type person..that does explain it..

 

i have a gold star of david necklace that was bought by my Grandparents from the World famous Jewellers Sterns of Jerusalem in the 70's for their first Grandchild ( which happened to be me..lucky blighter..lol )....

 

It's lovely...it has a gold star on a thin blue stone...they were told it was a precious stone probably Lapis Lazuli...

 

but every jeweller I have been to says it is nothing but ordinary enamel...it's wierd you hold it up to the light and it's almost transluscent and seems to glow....I've always loved that blue because of it ( it has no religious significance for me as an atheist, purely sentimental )...

 

I wonder if i put up a picture you'll be able to tell me what you think?

 

Buzz

Mk1 Parker Duofold Centennial in Blue Marble + GT, Medium arrow nib + broad italic aces nib.Owned since new.Parker Victory Black + GT, wet medium.Conway Stewart #388 Stub.

Mabie Todd Blackbird,semi Flex Nib.Aurora optima green auroloid Stub.Visconti voyger emerald green Broad. Waterman 92 Fine flex

www.hmshood.com The Official website of the late great HMS Hood

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aha jewlerry type person..that does explain it..

 

i have a gold star of david necklace that was bought by my Grandparents from the World famous Jewellers Sterns of Jerusalem in the 70's for their first Grandchild ( which happened to be me..lucky blighter..lol )....

 

It's lovely...it has a gold star on a thin blue stone...they were told it was a precious stone probably Lapis Lazuli...

 

but every jeweller I have been to says it is nothing but ordinary enamel...it's wierd you hold it up to the light and it's almost transluscent and seems to glow....I've always loved that blue because of it ( it has no religious significance for me as an atheist, purely sentimental )...

 

I wonder if i put up a picture you'll be able to tell me what you think?

 

Buzz

 

I think I would be interested in seeing the image. Lapis has small striations or gold like inclusions on it. I made a heart pendant for my Jewish girlfriend which if you looked on the back, you would see a Star of David on the back and had coral set in the middle of the star. I put a lot of love and attention to it AND THEN SHE LOST IT. GRRrrrrrr :mad:.

What Would The Flying Spaghetti Monster Do?

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i'll take some decent pics then tomorrow...

 

my uncle always loses anything expensive or difficult to make..lol

Mk1 Parker Duofold Centennial in Blue Marble + GT, Medium arrow nib + broad italic aces nib.Owned since new.Parker Victory Black + GT, wet medium.Conway Stewart #388 Stub.

Mabie Todd Blackbird,semi Flex Nib.Aurora optima green auroloid Stub.Visconti voyger emerald green Broad. Waterman 92 Fine flex

www.hmshood.com The Official website of the late great HMS Hood

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I recently got a bottle of this..very pleased..writes beautifully in my Cenntennial which previously has only ever had Quink Washable blue...

 

I see your point about bottle design...but the ink itself is lovely..as an everyday writer without being "too" business like i like it...it's my journal writer for now :)

 

i find the wetness perfect...miles better than the burgundy mont blanc i recently purchased...which was a dissappointment to me...i'll either swap that or wait till I get the OB Nibbed pen I'm after and try with that..

 

thanks for a fab review

Hi,

 

You're welcome!

 

I have come to prefer this ink from firm nibs, and also very much like the Look from a Parker England Duofold with a slightly stub-ish N nib. Somehow, I do not care for Topaz from a flexi nib, even though it performs well.

 

And the MB Burgundy Red is quite a dissapointment . . .

 

Bye,

S1

The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.

 

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Wow, this is probably the most thorough ink review I've ever read.

 

I have this ink and just put it in one of my pens and noticed it's extremely close to Pilot Iroshizuku Asa-Gao.

Hi,

 

As fortune would have it, I have samples of asa-gao and Topaz from a Sheaffer 330 + M nib on Rhodia.

 

Left: asa-gao Right: Topaz

http://i783.photobucket.com/albums/yy116/Sandy1-1/FPN_2012/e004a6bd.jpg

Also, Ink Review of Pilot asa-gao : http://www.fountainp...-pilot-asa-gao/

Bye,

S1

Edited by Sandy1

The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.

 

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Hrm, I certainly don't notice that big of a difference between them. I may be incorrect about the Asa-Gao part. I'll have to double check...

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nib width and flex makes larger tone differences.

 

My first shading ink MB Toffee was:

F was light with dark trails.

M was 50-50.

B was dark with light tails.

 

Semi-flex is normally a wetter nib so darker.

 

Papers of course strongly influence ink tones.

I know with 'flexi' OF and regular flex F, Topaz is very, very nice. Better than the wider nibs.

 

I'd not been quite so happy with the OBB nib I had it in, or a M I once tried it in. With heavy paper 170 Gmund and slick heavy paper Avery Zweckform 170, in BBL/OBB that was ever so nice in wide nibs.

With those papers, suddenly that wide nib danced just as good as those two F's.

 

 

So what one wants is to find what nibs and papers makes the ink dance.

 

I'll be starting a spread sheet for my self now that I have a start of a paper 'library', and 30 ink collection to go with some 30-35 nibs of this and that width and flex.

 

It would be a shame to find perfection, and forget to write it down properly. With any luck, has a nib and a paper that makes it dance.

Edited by Bo Bo Olson

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

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  • 2 months later...

[...]

but every jeweller I have been to says it is nothing but ordinary enamel...it's wierd you hold it up to the light and it's almost transluscent and seems to glow....

[...]

Buzz

 

That's exactly the point for creating the Edelstein series of ink. Personally, I believe these inks is all about the translucent glow. I saw it in the regular Pelikan 4001 inks but the Topaz exhibits this property in a more convincing manner.

____

Art Y.

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