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... How To Make Your Own Cahier ...


TMLee

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HOW TO MAKE YOUR OWN CAHIER ,

using

- a postcard ; and

- Rhodia paper ....

 

a quick (under 20mins) method ...

 

What you need :

Bonefolder;

paper cutter (with snap blades);

awl (or bradawl) ;

dental floss - waxed ;

one ballpoint needle;

steel ruler (straightedge);

a postcard;

5 sheets of Rhodia paper;

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Postcard/DSCF2823.jpg

 

Rhodia paper No.16 pad , mine was grid by Paul Smith ...

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Postcard/DSCF2766.jpg http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Postcard/DSCF2767.jpg

 

any postcard ...

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Postcard/DSCF2765.jpg

 

great to have a piercing cradle ; (you can make your own)

if you don't have , use a phonebook ...

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Postcard/DSCF2824.jpg http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Postcard/DSCF2826.jpg

 

 

The Rhodia pad is perfect bcos any standard postcard fits the pad like so ...

(the postcard is 1mm longer on each end, overhanging the Rhodia paper. This is perfect as I will explain later)

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Postcard/DSCF2768.jpg http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Postcard/DSCF2770.jpg

 

 

Preparing the bookblock

Cut out the Rhodia paper to size.

Lay the postcard on the bottom half of the Rhodia pad.

Use the steel rule to ensure a perfect alignment

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Postcard/DSCF2771.jpg

 

Keep the postcard in position , then cut out 5 sheets of paper like so ...

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Postcard/DSCF2772.jpg http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Postcard/DSCF2774.jpg

 

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Postcard/DSCF2775.jpg

 

 

Fold each of the 5 sheets using the bonefolder to get a crisp fold

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Postcard/DSCF2776.jpg

 

Put all the paper together and this is what you see - the so called 'fishtail' effect where the edges of the paper form a shape that looks like this ' > '

The more paper you use, the greater the fishtail effect, until it becomes aesthetically unacceptable.

Similarly, the thicker the paper is used, the greater the fishtail effect.

Rhodia paper is perfect bcos its thin and ink friendly.

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Postcard/DSCF2777.jpg

 

Fold the Postcard Cover

Postcard is about 250gsm or more.

Pretty thick.

Choose your own postcards, some are gloss finish and a little more resistant to accidental droplets of water.

This one has that gloss coating.

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Postcard/DSCF2778.jpg http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Postcard/DSCF2780.jpg

 

Put the bookblock into the cover and this is what you see.

Note the fishtail effect

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Postcard/DSCF2781.jpg http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Postcard/DSCF2782.jpg

 

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Postcard/DSCF2784.jpg

 

You are now ready to start the stitching ....

Edited by TMLee

... 665 crafted ... one at a time ... ☺️

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... continued ...

 

STITCHING THE CAHIER

STEP 1 - mark the sewing stations

Open the cover and mark where you want the sewing stations.

I punch sewing stations at close intervals at about 10mm apart.

The more you have, the better the Cahier will keep its shape and stave off 'wobbling' or getting loose.

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Postcard/DSCF2785.jpg http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Postcard/DSCF2786.jpg

 

 

STEP 2 - piercing

Put the entire Cahier (with the bookblock) with the spine skywards on the piercing cradle

and use an awl to pierce on the sewing stations you have marked on the spine.

Make sure the hole goes right thru ALL covers and 5 sheets of paper.

Make sure the hole is small bcos dental floss is very small in thickness. Otherwise you will end up with an oversized hole and the whole Cahier becomes loose over time.

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Postcard/DSCF2789.jpg http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Postcard/DSCF2791.jpg

 

Piercing completed

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Postcard/DSCF2793.jpg http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Postcard/DSCF2792.jpg

 

 

STEP 3 - stitching

Use any type of dental floss that is waxed. The reason is that the wax allows easier pull-throughs.

The other reason is that waxed cords do not tangle easily.

You can even use dental floss that is coloured.

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Postcard/DSCF2794.jpg

 

 

Use a ballpoint needle. A needle that is blunt tipped. I think it is also called a tapestry needle.

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Postcard/DSCF2796.jpg

 

 

How much length of dental floss needed ?

Twice the height of the Cahier then add 4inches on front end and another 4 inches on tail end.

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Postcard/DSCF2797.jpg

 

 

a) Enter from inside to outside on the second station from the top

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Postcard/DSCF2805.jpg

 

Leave about 4 inches trailing end (longer if it helps in your finger dexterity)

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Postcard/DSCF2806.jpg

 

 

b ) Enter the first station from outside to inside

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Postcard/DSCF2807.jpg

 

 

c) Tie a dead knot on the inside

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Postcard/DSCF2808.jpg

 

 

d ) re-enter the 2nd station from inside to outside

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Postcard/DSCF2809.jpg http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Postcard/DSCF2811.jpg

 

 

e) continue to enter all the stations downward , one hole after the other, in a zig-zag fashion.

This pic shows the last hole at the bottom of the spine

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Postcard/DSCF2812.jpg http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Postcard/DSCF2813.jpg

 

On the outside , it looks like this ...

Every other interval of sewing stations is missing the dental floss bcos the floss is on the inside of the cahier.

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Postcard/DSCF2814.jpg

 

f) now re-enter the next hole and work your way upwards

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Postcard/DSCF2815.jpg

 

g) when you reach the top, tie a dead knot (or two) to the trailing end of the floss when you started the stitching

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Postcard/DSCF2816.jpg

 

On the outside, every interval of sewing station has the dental floss visible.

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Postcard/DSCF2818.jpg

 

On the inside, the same look

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Postcard/DSCF2819.jpg

 

 

THE END PRODUCT

 

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Postcard/DSCF2821.jpg http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Postcard/DSCF2822.jpg

 

:P

Edited by TMLee

... 665 crafted ... one at a time ... ☺️

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NOTES

 

 

1) Why Use thin paper ?

Thin paper allows you to put in many sheets of paper together.

The piercing is done at one hole at one go bcos you want everything to line up nicely.

If you use thick paper and many sheets , you will encounter that fishtail effect which is expected to be overly pronounced.

Yes, you can trim off the edges, but thats extra work.

 

I believe that bagasse paper is ideal for this quick project.

Bagasse paper is thin and light in grammage.

Yet it is very good in ink friendliness.

You can put many folios together without too huge a fishtail.

 

One sheet of paper folded over is called a folio.

The example above uses 5 folios to form one signature.

This Cahier contains only one signature.

A bookblock is a collection of signatures bound together or in this case, only one signature.

 

 

2) Why dental floss?

This is quick DIY project using stuff easily found at home.

Also, dental floss is very strong.

Waxed gives it added protection from abrasion? Moisture damage

 

 

3) If you don't have a bonefolder?

Find something with a smooth round edge.

Hmm ... say, handle of a butter knife ?

Nice smooth rounded Chopstick? (definitely not the disposal type !)

 

 

4) Covers ?

Postcards are exact 4R size - yes same size as photographs !

which means ,

you can use photographs for covers !

Pick a nice photo you think will make a great cover and do the same procedure.

(I will do this next)

The only worry is that photos do not take kindly to water damage.

Maybe these days there are waterproof papers :hmm1:

The next concern is how well the spine can withstand prolonged use.

This is why this is a Cahier with a small number of pages so it gets used up quickly and faster than before it can wear out from use.

Alternatively, you can think up a solution to address this.

I am thinking of MagicTape over the spine but I haven't tried this yet.

 

With photographs, the possibilities are endless.

Just think about it.

 

Another alternative are great looking greeting cards.

Bigger but still do-able.

You can have very nice looking covers of thicker card grammage.

 

Enjoy :P

... 665 crafted ... one at a time ... ☺️

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HOW TO MAKE YOUR OWN CAHIER

using a Photograph and Rhodia paper ....

 

As mentioned above, this time using a photograph for the cover of the Cahier ...

 

Select a photograph of 4R size ...

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Photo/DSCF2829.jpg

 

Fold it into half

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Photo/DSCF2830.jpg

 

And pierce with the bookblock held in position

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Photo/DSCF2831.jpg http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Photo/DSCF2832.jpg

 

 

Stitched and Completed under 15mins ...

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Photo/DSCF2834.jpg http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Photo/DSCF2835.jpg

 

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Photo/DSCF2833.jpg

 

 

Note,

I ripped apart the Rhodia pad, removing its staples.

The entire Rhodia sheet can yield 2 4R size Cahiers. :thumbup:

(But with the stapled punch holes still there on your writing page ...)

 

 

 

Next would be a greeting card as cover ....

Edited by TMLee

... 665 crafted ... one at a time ... ☺️

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Wow. Thanks for this. I'd love to see how other people do. I wish I had the ability, time, and space to give it a try.

 

Doug

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Wow! This is a fantastic tutorial! I've collected postcards for a while and mostly they just sit around in a drawer being unused - what a great way to feature them, as well as making something useful.

 

Thanks for this - great pics and explanations.

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Might I suggest using quilt/seam binding and tacky glue to go over the outside stitching?

 

...purely from a practical point of view. It might look awful, IDK

 

 

-Kel

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Might I suggest using quilt/seam binding and tacky glue to go over the outside stitching?

 

...purely from a practical point of view. It might look awful, IDK

 

 

-Kel

 

Another way would be to sew the paper together then glue the outer pages to the inside of the postcard.

 

 

 

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Might I suggest using quilt/seam binding and tacky glue to go over the outside stitching?

 

...purely from a practical point of view. It might look awful, IDK

 

 

-Kel

 

Another way would be to sew the paper together then glue the outer pages to the inside of the postcard.

 

 

 

 

I have something similar I made for myself a little while ago. It is a top bound cahier. As for the first suggestion it will change the booklet drastically. The binding TMLee demonstrated will lay flat. If I understand what you mean by a quilt binding (I did google it) sewing outside cover to outside cover will not produce a book that lays flat. If you want to you can, but I would suggest this. It is called a stab binding, it is similar to what you want. As for the glue it really should not be necessary. As to the suggestion of gluing the cover on; you could do that, but I think it will weaken the binding as now only paper and string holds this together. The only advantage is that the postcard or picture remains unpunctured, but it is still glued and folded.

 

I really do recommend following his instructions above. I did something similar, though I only tied one knot. The only real difference is that the first dead knot is not required, although it will make life easier. Without it you just need to hold the thread for a hole or two and retension at the end.

 

Rick

Need money for pens, must make good notebooks. :)

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Might I suggest using quilt/seam binding and tacky glue to go over the outside stitching?

 

...purely from a practical point of view. It might look awful, IDK

 

 

-Kel

 

Another way would be to sew the paper together then glue the outer pages to the inside of the postcard.

 

 

 

 

I have something similar I made for myself a little while ago. It is a top bound cahier. As for the first suggestion it will change the booklet drastically. The binding TMLee demonstrated will lay flat. If I understand what you mean by a quilt binding (I did google it) sewing outside cover to outside cover will not produce a book that lays flat. If you want to you can, but I would suggest this. It is called a stab binding, it is similar to what you want. As for the glue it really should not be necessary. As to the suggestion of gluing the cover on; you could do that, but I think it will weaken the binding as now only paper and string holds this together. The only advantage is that the postcard or picture remains unpunctured, but it is still glued and folded.

 

I really do recommend following his instructions above. I did something similar, though I only tied one knot. The only real difference is that the first dead knot is not required, although it will make life easier. Without it you just need to hold the thread for a hole or two and retension at the end.

 

Rick

 

Actually, I was just thinking of gluing the seam/quilt binding flat on top of the outside stitching. The look would be similar to the back of a composition book, for comparison. It would cover the outside stitches to protect them a bit and not interfere with the open lay of the book, as it would just be on the outside of the cover.

 

 

-Kel

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Might I suggest using quilt/seam binding and tacky glue to go over the outside stitching?

 

...purely from a practical point of view. It might look awful, IDK

 

 

-Kel

 

Another way would be to sew the paper together then glue the outer pages to the inside of the postcard.

 

 

 

 

I have something similar I made for myself a little while ago. It is a top bound cahier. As for the first suggestion it will change the booklet drastically. The binding TMLee demonstrated will lay flat. If I understand what you mean by a quilt binding (I did google it) sewing outside cover to outside cover will not produce a book that lays flat. If you want to you can, but I would suggest this. It is called a stab binding, it is similar to what you want. As for the glue it really should not be necessary. As to the suggestion of gluing the cover on; you could do that, but I think it will weaken the binding as now only paper and string holds this together. The only advantage is that the postcard or picture remains unpunctured, but it is still glued and folded.

 

I really do recommend following his instructions above. I did something similar, though I only tied one knot. The only real difference is that the first dead knot is not required, although it will make life easier. Without it you just need to hold the thread for a hole or two and retension at the end.

 

Rick

 

Actually, I was just thinking of gluing the seam/quilt binding flat on top of the outside stitching. The look would be similar to the back of a composition book, for comparison. It would cover the outside stitches to protect them a bit and not interfere with the open lay of the book, as it would just be on the outside of the cover.

 

 

-Kel

 

Ok, now I am sure that I don't know how you want to do that binding. Still the glue is not necessary. The notebook I bound in this style rides in my pocket daily and I have had no problems with the binding coming undone.

 

Rick

Need money for pens, must make good notebooks. :)

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HOW TO MAKE YOUR OWN CAHIER PART 3

using

- a Greeting Card ; and

- 80gsm photocopy paper

 

Pick a nice greeting card ...

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Greeting%20Card/DSCF2837.jpg http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Greeting%20Card/DSCF2838.jpg

 

 

Reinforced spine ?

There were some discussions above about protecting the spine.

In this case, this particular blank card had a spine that didn't look folded but cut partway.

The inner ply of paper was clearly visible like so

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Greeting%20Card/DSCF2839.jpg

 

Its a cause for concern becos this edge is bound to suffer damage from normal use.

 

 

So i decided to use MagicTape as mentioned earlier , to protect this exposed spine .

Perhaps this method may address concerns about wear and tear on the spine.

I personally think it won't wear out bcos the Cahier will be completely filled rather quickly before it begins to see wear and tear.

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Greeting%20Card/DSCF2841.jpg

 

 

Tape the entire height of spine and foldover

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Greeting%20Card/DSCF2842.jpg http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Greeting%20Card/DSCF2843.jpg

 

 

The taped spine

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Greeting%20Card/DSCF2844.jpg

 

 

Cut out 5 sheets of ordinary copier paper

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Greeting%20Card/DSCF2847.jpg

 

The 'fishtail' effect here more pronounced since this is 80gsm paper

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Greeting%20Card/DSCF2849.jpg

 

 

The spine pierced

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Greeting%20Card/DSCF2851.jpg http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Greeting%20Card/DSCF2852.jpg

 

 

After threading from top to bottom once

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Greeting%20Card/DSCF2854.jpg

 

 

After moving back upwards and tying off

Here every station has the floss

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Greeting%20Card/DSCF2856.jpg

 

 

The completed Cahier - greeting card size

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Greeting%20Card/DSCF2857.jpg

 

 

The inside front flyleaf

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u236/TMLee/2010%20HOW-TO/Cahier%20Greeting%20Card/DSCF2859.jpg

 

 

under 10 mins :P

... 665 crafted ... one at a time ... ☺️

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This is fantastic, but I have a few questions, if you don't mind...

 

Is the fishtail visible on the greetings card cahier? If not, how did you ensure it wasn't? By cutting the copier paper shorter? How difficult is that to do? I'd like to have a go at this but would perfer a few more pages, say, 8 folio's into one signature, but would like to know how to eliminate, as much as possible, the fishtail effect.

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This is fantastic, but I have a few questions, if you don't mind...

 

Is the fishtail visible on the greetings card cahier? If not, how did you ensure it wasn't? By cutting the copier paper shorter? How difficult is that to do? I'd like to have a go at this but would perfer a few more pages, say, 8 folio's into one signature, but would like to know how to eliminate, as much as possible, the fishtail effect.

 

 

Hi tawanda,

Yes, the fishtail effect is visible on the Cahier above.

The thicker the paper you use , the more pronounced the fishtail effect.

Conversely, less if the paper is thinner.

 

I would think one simple way to resolve this is to cut away the fishtail AFTER completing the entire Cahier.

This way, you get a clean and perfect edge. :thumbup:

Less troublesome than trying to figure out how much shorter to cut the paper when preparing the bookblock.

 

Treat it as a 'quickie' DIY project.

Make a few at one go. Innovate along the way as you see fit and as is necessary. :)

 

 

Some ideas ...

1) you can make a series of Cahiers depending on hue of the covers, say a pack of 4 bearing a red theme. All different postcard covers but all having red as a predominant theme.

 

or a pack of 4 bearing tinted writing paper. Say a pack of 4 containing white paper. Another pack of 4 in grocery bag kraft paper even.

 

or a pack of 4 bearing coloured dental floss.

 

2) You can make the corners rounded using a corner punch if you like

 

 

3) Photo covers are limiltless in variations and possibilities.

You can use Sepia coloured photos.

 

or Black and white photos

 

or photos of a certain theme.

 

 

4) You can even use cereal boxes as covers :P

 

and etc , etc ....

 

 

Enjoy :D

... 665 crafted ... one at a time ... ☺️

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  • 3 months later...

Absolutely stunning! Thanks for the tutorials and photographs. I've lots of cards and postcards. so now I know how to use them!

 

One quick question about cutting paper--sorry, I'm not sure if you cover it in the other thread about handmade journals--which kind of paper cutter is the best? I suppose for the fishtail, it makes sense to use a guillotine? TIA.

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Absolutely stunning! Thanks for the tutorials and photographs. I've lots of cards and postcards. so now I know how to use them!

 

One quick question about cutting paper--sorry, I'm not sure if you cover it in the other thread about handmade journals--which kind of paper cutter is the best? I suppose for the fishtail, it makes sense to use a guillotine? TIA.

 

 

Thanks holgalee,

I don't think there's any 'right' way to cut. :)

I use an ordinary paper cutter with snap-off blades.

In keeping with the (easy to do) tutorial featured, an ordinary paper box cutter is more readily available than a guillotine.

 

My (limited) experience with guillotines have been unsuccessful.

I don't think I am adept at it. The paper tends to run out of position during the cut ruining the whole affair.

Using a paper cutter and a steel rule for me ensures full control which is what I want.

But that's just me. :-)

Your experience might be different. Enjoy :-)

 

You can make them as gifts for the upcoming festive season.

 

Rgds

TMLee

... 665 crafted ... one at a time ... ☺️

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You're a born teacher as well as an innovative craftsman! I'll print these off for future reference (i.e., the dead of winter when I have time for fun projects).

 

And, you're a pretty darned good photographer as well.

 

Thank you.

first fountain pen: student Sheaffer, 1956

next fountain pen: Montblanc 146 circa 1990

favourite ink: Noodler's Zhivago

favourite pen: Waterman No. 12

most beautiful pen: Conway Stewart 84 red with gold veins, oh goodness gracious

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The problem with the guillotine cutters is that the paper will run out of position unless it comes with a heavy duty clamp. You can use an electric cutter that allows more sheets of paper and comes with a built in clamp, but then again, you need to consider the cost of that kind of equipment.

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