Jump to content
Classifieds is broken, please do not submit any new ads ×

Bhr Crack Repair


algabatz
 Share

Recommended Posts

I got a tip from a prominent pen repairer that Loctite #480, which is a black cyanocrylate, containing small pieces of rubber for greater flexibility, could be successfully used for gluing cracks in black hard rubber pens.

 

Well this is how it turned out on a Parker turban top Lucky Curve with a severe crack. (I have also re-blackened it.)

 

http://parkercollector.com/bilder/turban-cracked-cap-before-after.jpg

 

 

Now we only have to wait for Loctite to offer a #480 in red!

 

/Tony

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 13
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • lallin

    1

  • algabatz

    6

  • ljwahl

    1

  • daenghafez

    2

Top Posters In This Topic

Wow.. Thanks for sharing. Where can I get this Loctite #480? Can this work on celluloid?Btw, How did you blacken the pen? Thanking in advance for the info.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wow.. Thanks for sharing. Where can I get this Loctite #480? Can this work on celluloid?Btw, How did you blacken the pen? Thanking in advance for the info.

 

I'm not sure about the celluloid. This glue workes fine on hard rubber pens, because it contains rubber, I suppose.

For celluloid I either use clean acetone for fusing cracks and/or a more flexible gel-like cyanoacrylate that also provides minute flexibility when dry.

 

Beware, You can thoroughly destroy any pen with glue if You don't know exactly what You're doing. I suggest practicing on cheap pens until You get the hang of it. And there's of course no guarantee that a fixed pen will keep forever, especially if the glue is in contact with ink.

 

The re-blackening I use is Pen potion #9, which basically is liquid natural rubber.

 

http://www.pensburymanor.com/PMBHRPPNo9.html

 

Works very nice, but again, it takes some practice to get it right.

 

Good luck!

 

/Tony

Link to comment
Share on other sites

An excellent rescue-- you've made something unusable usable again. Well done!

 

This pen, and its before and after shots, also happens to offer a great example for the re-blackening conversation: here's a broken example of a significant pen. After repairing it to make it usable, why not reblacken it to make it more aesthetically pleasing? This assumes full disclosure of both processes should the pen ever change hands...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wow.. Thanks for sharing. Where can I get this Loctite #480? Can this work on celluloid?Btw, How did you blacken the pen? Thanking in advance for the info.

 

I'm not sure about the celluloid. This glue workes fine on hard rubber pens, because it contains rubber, I suppose.

For celluloid I either use clean acetone for fusing cracks and/or a more flexible gel-like cyanoacrylate that also provides minute flexibility when dry.

 

Beware, You can thoroughly destroy any pen with glue if You don't know exactly what You're doing. I suggest practicing on cheap pens until You get the hang of it. And there's of course no guarantee that a fixed pen will keep forever, especially if the glue is in contact with ink.

 

The re-blackening I use is Pen potion #9, which basically is liquid natural rubber.

 

http://www.pensburymanor.com/PMBHRPPNo9.html

 

Works very nice, but again, it takes some practice to get it right.

 

Good luck!

 

/Tony

 

Tony, Thank you so much for sharing. Regards, Daeng.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Any idea of the shelf-life of Loctite 480, especially after opening it and using a bit? It's pretty expensive and I would imagine a little bit is all that is needed for a typical pen repair; it would be a shame to have the majority of a bottle "go bad".

Edited by lallin
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would be very interested in knowing the durability of this joint for several reasons:-

  1. The obvious - how long does the joint last in BHR? Adhesives are not usually terribly strong. A couple of months of use without a failure would be a good indicator
  2. At work I often have to use CA adhesives on flexible seals, and Permabond 737 'Black Magic' is not great on flexible seals - it's the best I've found but still isn't good.

 

As for Iallin's point, the shelf life. I have no idea about Loctite 480, but have found that on other things Loctite's use by dates are very conservative, and it can work properly years after the use-by date with little reduction in performance (in UK normal conditions). If the stuff is stored in a cool area (such as a fridge) the Arrenius [or however it's spelt] equation indicates that for every 10C reduction in temp, the shelf life should approximately double. Now, this is a rule of thumb and is not applicable in every case, but it works more often than not.

 

Regards,

 

Richard.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

An excellent rescue-- you've made something unusable usable again. Well done!

 

This pen, and its before and after shots, also happens to offer a great example for the re-blackening conversation: here's a broken example of a significant pen. After repairing it to make it usable, why not reblacken it to make it more aesthetically pleasing? This assumes full disclosure of both processes should the pen ever change hands...

 

Thank You, and of course (although it's chances of escaping my collection is slim ;-)

 

/Tony

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The slam on CA is that it absorbs water which would ultimately lead to failure.

 

I think in this case, Tony probably isn't going to be inking this baby. It's going into the collection not the writing rotation. So that issue may be moot?

 

This might also mitigate the issue of weak joints due to oxidation on the joined edges if the cap won't be in use.

 

Tony, it appears the #9 blackened the CA just like the HR. Is it really as invisible as the photo indicates?

 

John

so many pens, so little time.......

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The slam on CA is that it absorbs water which would ultimately lead to failure.

 

I think in this case, Tony probably isn't going to be inking this baby. It's going into the collection not the writing rotation. So that issue may be moot?

 

This might also mitigate the issue of weak joints due to oxidation on the joined edges if the cap won't be in use.

 

Tony, it appears the #9 blackened the CA just like the HR. Is it really as invisible as the photo indicates?

 

John

 

Yes, You can see the mending with a loupe, since the CA is a tad "glossier" than the more porous hard rubber. But it really looks great to the naked eye. Also, since the damage was to the cap lip, and the cap is a Jack Knife safety, I could actually use it if I wanted. I have filled it and tried it, works like a charm. But You're right, it won't be one of the pens I usually keep handy in my jacket ;-)

 

Also, I'm not really sure about the "absorbs water" part. This particular glue was manufactured to fix rubber pipes, and since it indeed does contain rubber, it might actually be more water resistant than other cyanoacrylate relatives. I think I'm even going to test this, I'll see if i can find a hr barrel or cap, smash it, glue it and keep it filled with water for a couple of months. If and when it starts dripping, I'll know.

 

/Tony

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would be very interested in knowing the durability of this joint for several reasons:-
  1. At work I often have to use CA adhesives on flexible seals, and Permabond 737 'Black Magic' is not great on flexible seals - it's the best I've found but still isn't good.

Have you tried any of the Sicomet adhesives for rubber, such as # 8300? I have not, but would like to know how well they work.

 

As for Iallin's point, the shelf life...

It's been my experience that refrigeration doesn't help much. The CA may not actually harden, but it loses its ability to bond.

 

-- Brian

fpn_1375035941__postcard_swap.png * * * "Don't neglect to write me several times from different places when you may."
-- John Purdue (1863)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share








×
×
  • Create New...