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Would like to have artist fountain pen made



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Will pay top dollar!!! I recently owned an Edward Jenkins Safety fountain pen. The pen was made in around the 40's or early 50's by Baltimore Pen maker Edward Jenkins. There was a Fountain Pen Hospital on Franklin Street in Baltimore in the 40’s and 50’s run by Edward Jenkins. Mr. Jenkins repaired pens in his lower level shop as well as turning out large hard rubber safety pens that he sold to artists. He had nibs made in England with his name on them. When he died, his pens/parts went to Fahrneys pen hospital in Washington DC. The large safety was able to handle thicker inks including my own hand-made walnut ink made from Maryland walnuts each year.

 

I am an artist and I had my Jenkins pen for 15 years before it was stolen. I would like to replace it if I could ever find another one like it. I only know of one other and it is also owned by an artist who will not part with it. I continue to search, but maybe having one made is an answer.

 

The pen looks and acts like a retractable spiral Waterman 42, except it was much larger in size than a Waterman 42. The pen was large around 6.5-7 inches, polished black hard rubber, larger diameter than the 42, a hand-made silver clip attached to the cap, and stamped Jenkins Pens Baltimore on the side. The nib was stamped with Jenkins, a symbol of a cross, and Made in England on it. The pen came with two nibs - a fine writing nib and a music nib both mounted in their own separated shafts for changing out. The retracting mechanism was the later spiral type so that the nib did not turn when going in and out of the barrel. I still own the fine writing nib since the music nib was in the pen when it disappeared.

 

Attached is a picture of the writing nib in shaft which I still have. I could provide the nib I have and it would be nice if it could be used in the new pen.

 

If you know of any pens which would be similar or could make one to serve as an everyday artist pen (thicker inks) please let me know.

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Edited by broadws
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Two suggestions: One is to check out Gopens.com, where they have very impressive catalogues of vintage pens. Perhaps they might have what you're looking for. The other is that maybe Brian Gray could make a body for your pen. It'd certainly be worth talking to him about it.

 

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Two suggestions: One is to check out Gopens.com, where they have very impressive catalogues of vintage pens. Perhaps they might have what you're looking for. The other is that maybe Brian Gray could make a body for your pen. It'd certainly be worth talking to him about it.

 

 

Thank you for your suggestion!

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Two suggestions: One is to check out Gopens.com, where they have very impressive catalogues of vintage pens. Perhaps they might have what you're looking for. The other is that maybe Brian Gray could make a body for your pen. It'd certainly be worth talking to him about it.

 

 

Thank you for your suggestion!

 

If Brian is not interested or his schedule is too full, drop me a note. I would be willing to take on the project.

 

Thanks

Dan

Dan Symonds

Houston, Texas

www.artcarvedpens.com

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Hi!

Sorry to hear about your loss of the Jenkins pen... I too like artists pen and am current using an Osmoroid Indian Ink..whic is specifically for thicker inks...but has more of a sketch nib...less flex than a music nib which I have on a nother osmoroid...I use both for sketching although the music nibbed pen only takes fountain blacks... the alternative is the rotring sketch...which takes the thicker ink.... but as a pen for drawing is so characterless[iMHO] and better ona dartboard... but like most other artists who use the thicker inks... you still cant beat the old dip pens!...I am meaning to try other fountain pens with Noodlers ' Heart of darkness ' ink...esp with the japanese calligraphy nibs [sailor/ Hero ]ready bent!

Good luck!

Sunil

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QUOTE (Sunil @ Apr 8 2009, 05:23 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Hi!
Sorry to hear about your loss of the Jenkins pen... I too like artists pen and am current using an Osmoroid Indian Ink..whic is specifically for thicker inks...but has more of a sketch nib...less flex than a music nib which I have on a nother osmoroid...I use both for sketching although the music nibbed pen only takes fountain blacks... the alternative is the rotring sketch...which takes the thicker ink.... but as a pen for drawing is so characterless[iMHO] and better ona dartboard... but like most other artists who use the thicker inks... you still cant beat the old dip pens!...I am meaning to try other fountain pens with Noodlers ' Heart of darkness ' ink...esp with the japanese calligraphy nibs [sailor/ Hero ]ready bent!
Good luck!
Sunil


Hi,

I used to have an Osmoroid myself. But when i got my Jenkins it was like heaven. I make my own walnut ink and it handle it very well because the nib was large and it stay wet being a Safety style fountain pen. I used it nearly every day for fifteen years and am quite lost without it.

He is one of the last life drawings done with it. Not quite a crow nib but the large music nib was very flexible.

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  • 4 weeks later...
Randal6393

A possible alternative, not sure how it would suit you, would be to order an Ackerman Pump Pen. His website is here. He offers several versions, made for Gillott nibs, crowquills, Hunt dip pens, etc. The pens are adjusted to handle thicker media than standard fountain pen ink. I use Noodler Heart of Darkness in mine -- set up for Gillott 303 nibs. Very satisfied with it. Why not give it a look?

 

Sorry to hear about your loss of the old pen, hope life gets better soon. Enjoy,

Yours,
Randal

From a person's actions, we may infer attitudes, beliefs, --- and values. We do not know these characteristics outright. The human dichotomies of trust and distrust, honor and duplicity, love and hate --- all depend on internal states we cannot directly experience. Isn't this what adds zest to our life?

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  • 3 months later...

This is an update to this older post.

The pen Scott wanted was replaced by a new pen that I made for him. It was produced from ebonite and uses the original Jenkins nib and nib holder he had. and with some back and forth discussion over the course of a couple of weeks, we decided on the size and style for the pen. The pen was a challange to produce due to several unique features. The ID of the barrel is grooved in order for a guide pen to ride to prevent the nib holder from rotating. Additionally the helix advancing mechanism was interesting. All in all it was a very fun and satisfying project.

 

I am thinking of making this a new pen style in my line of pens.

 

I think Scott is happy with the pen and he sent me a copy of a sketch he did with the pen. He was a great person to work with and a very talented artist.

 

Thanks

Dan Symonds

 

Waterman safety on top , Jenkins style below

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Pieces and parts.

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Actuator, nib holder and nib assembled

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Jenkins style pen assembled with nib advanced.

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Dan Symonds

Houston, Texas

www.artcarvedpens.com

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Wow x 4

Fool: One who subverts convention or orthodoxy or varies from social conformity in order to reveal spiritual or moral truth.

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Very nice indeed. I definitely think there's a market there for a modern artists' safety pen. I have the Ackerman (I'm an artist, too), but it doesn't feel like a quality piece. I like the simple, understated quality of what you've created - this is a serious tool, and looks it.

Anton Emdin

Illustrations & Cartoons

www.antonemdin.com

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 4 weeks later...
  • 1 year later...

Resurrecting an old thread but this is one stunning piece of work! Please accept my heartiest congratulations,Dan. Just curious,why did Jenkins make the original as a safety pen. If the purpose was to make a large pen which would work with thick inks without clogging the feed,wouldn't a normal eyedropper have sufficed. Was this made as a safety pen for a particular reason? If I understood correctly,the Jenkins pen was made in 40s and 50s,when the era of safety pens was effectively over. Please excuse my ignorance,I am a newbie and my knowledge of fountain pens is rather limited.

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  • 2 years later...
CaptainGroovy

I know that it has been several years since this thread was opened but I am the owner of a Jenkins nib that I was thinking about selling, now I am not so sure after looking at that beautiful pen.

They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety

Benjamin Franklin

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