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  1. The other brand sections have this kind of thread, and I couldn't believe we don't have one for Parker. So here we go. What Parkers have you added to your collection lately? We have 100 years worth of pens with the Parker name, and some of us are addicted to gathering them up. I have a number of items on order, both vintage and modern, and I will mention those as they arrive over the next few weeks. But to get us started, here's the ebay photo of a P45 I just scored: Burgundy Parker 45, 14k Medium - described as NOS. In fact, that's how I found it. I was searching for gold P45 nibs. I had to grab this one because: 1. I don't have this color yet. (I am hoping it's not the same color as my red one.) 2. A gold Medium nib is my P45 sweet spot. (I do have a 14k broad nib unit on the way, too, to upgrade one of my two steel Fines.) 3. That squeeze converter alone could cost half of what I just paid for this pen, and I only have one of those. My other P45s use carts or one of the modern twist converters. So, now it's your turn. Let's keep this one going, shall we?
  2. Hello, I have a parker vacumatic twist type pencil that I recently received as part of a Vacumatic FP/Pencil set (though.. they don't look like an original set as the bands don't match). The body is in excellent condition but the mechanism doesn't seem to be working. I can twist it either direction without reaching any stop and I do not see the clutch or anything extend from the tip to grip the lead. I have tried slipping lead in it but do not feel anything in the barrel to clear out so I don't think it's a lead jam. I don't see a way to take the mechanism apart for further inspection. Does anyone have any experience with these and advice on how to try to get it working? Or is there some place to buy a replacement mechanism/send it for repair? I've attached some images of the pencil and mechanism.
  3. mikhasan

    Vacumatic Conversion

    Has anyone ever attempted to convert a Parker Vacumatic (Second Generation) into a cartridge-converter? I love the material of the Vacumatic but am not a huge fan of the filling system. Any tips or photos would be immensely helpful. Thanks in advance!
  4. Hello, I'm new to this forum and new to vintage pen repair (although not to fountain pens themselves). Rather stupidly, I learned the hard way that 1. Vacumatics are hard to repair, and 2. celluloid hates hot water. I found a replacement barrel online, and everything fits (as well as a replacement barrel could fit). But the replacement barrel is 3.5mm shorter - the original is 67mm while the replacement is 63.5mm. Does this make a difference (eg. between Long Major and Major), or is this within normal variation? (Original barrel is 1942Q3, replacement is 1946Q2) P.S. Both Vacumatics I have have "A" stamped under the feed. What does this mean?
  5. Hi guys, I am looking at this pen with a lot of of interest. But I don’t want to pay over £30 for a pen that will break on me. Has anyone been using this for a while? Can you attest to their reliability? I want to try a vacuum filling system and these have the nicest body by far. I am particularly fond of the Sherry Acrylic. I know the nibs aren’t the best on this brand, but I would be willing to change it if it’s possible. I am getting more interested in custom grinds... Any advice/experiences? thanks 😊
  6. I love my Parker vacumatic. Its nib is the best I’ve ever written with. It seems to be an extra fine/fine and though it doesnt have line variation like a stub or italic/ the line width isn't totally uniform and has some nice character. There is a wonderful almost pencil-like feedback. What modern pens would you recommend that have a similar feel? I’m guessing gold nibs? I’m tired of the likes of Kaweco nibs that feel like a nail and not as tactile.
  7. My wife has a vintage Parker Vacumatic that is a family heirloom. Does anyone know of a repair shop with an online web page that "specializes" in "complete Parker Vacumatic restoration"?? I have seen Danny Fudge at The Write Pen mentioned here, and Ron at Main Street Pens . Are there others (other than the above) in the USA that are reputable (Vacumatics), do great work. Thanks for your help. jim
  8. KiltedKrafts

    Advice Required! Vacumatic Plunger Fix.

    Hi guys. Advice needed. I am repairing this slim vacumatic and when i took the plunger out, i noticed there seems to be a bit missing. the cup for the ink sac pellet to pop into. can it be repaired, as in a new pellet cup? or do i need a new plunger unit? and finally, do any of you lovely people sell the parts i would need and how can i purchase them without going against the guidelines of this forum? Pics for reference. Thanks guys n gals. love you all. Dave C.
  9. I am looking for a clever idea. I do not remember when I purchased the pen. I was cleaning a Vacumatic and the retaining collar for the filler screwed off from the barrel when I went to remove the blind cap. The cap is tight on the collar and I cannot remove the cap. Inside the cap is the brass cap for the spring. I have repeatedly tried dry heat without luck. The tapered profile of the end cap is difficult to grip, even with section pliers. Has anyone comes across this problem? Any clever ideas on how to remove the collar?
  10. I went to clean my Green Half-Coronet and the tip fell off the end. Looking at the pieces, I realized the celluloid had started to crystallize and decompose while stored in the converted cigar box. I have since isolated the pen and started researching the best methods to store celluloid pens. I have a Vacumatic Green/Brown Candy Stripe stored in a converted cigar box. Looking at the clear tip of the cap, I noticed slight crazing at the jewel threads (besides the usual shrinkage). Does any have any suggestions on the best method to store this pen to prevent or slow down crystallization? I am looking into buying zeolite paper to help absorb any gases. What is the best method to store pens? Any advice or recommendations are greatly appreciated
  11. WLSpec

    Where To Look For A 51 Vacumatic

    I haven't ventured much into the world of vintage Parker pens, but after hearing endless good things about the 51, I am thinking of getting one. I am curious to know where you would recommend looking for one (best online stores) and what prices to look for. So far it looks like I could potentially get one for around $80 or so (looking for a regular sized vacumatic P51) but I want to make sure it is restored and in decent condition (I am looking on Ebay, but I have had some bad pen experiences on Ebay and I would want to make sure it is a good seller). So, what price should I look for with a P51 Vacumatic, and where should I look? (I have also been scanning classifieds but I don't see many there). Thank you for any info Edit: Likely doesn't matter, but I am okay if it doesn't have a nib in it - just might give a few more options
  12. So I'm pretty happy with my (mostly cheap) pens but from time to time I come across a few pens that I find really beautiful, like Parker Vacumatics. I have never seen one in person and it's highly unlikely I ever will, but have seen some restored ones on ebay. After almost pulling the trigger I realized these seem like smaller pens, particularly the section might be too small. I searched online but didn't find anything conclusive. So for those who have them: would a Vacumatic (say a Major) be too small for bigger hands? To give you and idea Parker Sonnets aren't very big but I find them comfortable, anything smaller like a Vector is painfully uncomfortable.
  13. Or not ~~ interesting, like beauty, is in the eye of the beholder. This custom "51" features the following: Four “quick change” threaded cap top jewels: 1) a Solid Gold Crown – ideal to have on the pen in your pocket when going to see the dentist – this one is also of course known as the Crown Jewel; 2) .45 solid lead – ideal for high caliber meetings; 3) 9mm Brass Jacket suitable for lower caliber meetings or casual writing; 4) 146/9 Mont Blanc White Star - ideal for highly pretentious meetings with status conscious individuals or groups… etc. The stainless steel cap has been bead blasted and strongly resembles titanium. The war time Vermeil Blue Diamond clip is bent in such a fashion that it would hard if not impossible to duplicate – it is definitely crooked… but, I have not ever found it to be dishonest in any respect. The hood or shell is dark blue and the barrel is black – reminiscent of two-tone cars in the ‘50s & 60’s. The filling unit and blind cap are oversized slightly. The longer than standard ink pump rod is brass and is housed in one excellent red anodized bushing. The added vacuum pressure sort of supercharges the filling system. The end of the rod contains a silver disc with the Parker Halo encased in translucent red plastic from the Parker Model Shop – the same exact red plastic used to make the Parker T-1 red jewels – it took way too long to make but that’s just hindsight. The nib is an 18k 61 nib which was made in the UK. Don’t know the reason why but 51 and 61 nibs made in the UK are just better writers and smoother than those made in the US – just a fact. Like it – Love it – or Hate it – you’ve got to at least agree it’s interesting…? Life’s too short to always take Pens too seriously. ralph prather
  14. Or not ~~ interesting, like beauty, is in the eye of the beholder. This custom "51" features the following: Four “quick change” threaded cap top jewels: 1) a Solid Gold Crown – ideal to have on the pen in your pocket when going to see the dentist – this one is also of course known as the Crown Jewel; 2) .45 solid lead – ideal for high caliber meetings; 3) 9mm Brass Jacket suitable for lower caliber meetings or casual writing; 4) 146/9 Mont Blanc White Star - ideal for highly pretentious meetings with status conscious individuals or groups… etc. The stainless steel cap has been bead blasted and strongly resembles titanium. The war time Vermeil Blue Diamond clip is bent in such a fashion that it would hard if not impossible to duplicate – it is definitely crooked… but, I have not ever found it to be dishonest in any respect. The hood or shell is dark blue and the barrel is black – reminiscent of two-tone cars in the ‘50s & 60’s. The filling unit and blind cap are oversized slightly. The longer than standard ink pump rod is brass and is housed in one excellent red anodized bushing. The added vacuum pressure sort of supercharges the filling system. The end of the rod contains a silver disc with the Parker Halo encased in translucent red plastic from the Parker Model Shop – the same exact red plastic used to make the Parker T-1 red jewels – it took way too long to make but that’s just hindsight. The nib is an 18k 61 nib which was made in the UK. Don’t know the reason why but 51 and 61 nibs made in the UK are just better writers and smoother than those made in the US – just a fact. Like it – Love it – or Hate it – you’ve got to at least agree it’s interesting…? Life’s too short to always take Pens too seriously. ralph prather
  15. I have gotten a vintage Parker Vacumatic back from an unreliable repair person who was supposed to restore it. I'm not going to follow up on the repair guy, no sense in wasting time on it. The pen feed leaks and oozes ink uncontrollably. (what a mess) How do I fix this? Thanks, jim
  16. Dear Friends, I'll be in Canada all August this year, in Waterloo-Kitchener, Ontario. Can my Canadian colleagues tell me if there are any fountain pen events in this area (pen shows, meetings, etc.) in August, and if and where there are any antique shops and flea markets, where you can find pens, other writing instruments, etc... I am mainly interested in Pelikan, Montblanc, but also Parker Duofold, Vacumatic and all others. Mostly vintage pens... . I'd like to talk about fountain pens, maybe I'll buy, sell or trade something. I am also interested in pens for parts and to be repaired. I would be grateful for your information and guidance, thank you in advance. Contact me at the Forum or directly via PM
  17. Inkysloth

    Lovely Broad 51 Vac Nib!

    Hi folks, I had my eye on a 51 on Ebay that only had four fairly uninformative photographs and fairly minimal description (made in Canada, Parker 51), but the nib looked potentially interesting (though a little out of focus) It could have been blurriness - or a very broad nib. I made an offer of £20, and figured at worst I would have a parts pen. Turned out to be a 1947 vac-fill 51 in reasonable condition, with a seriously broad stub nib. I've only dipped it so far, but it writes really nicely. I'm waiting for a diaphragm & shellac in the post (my last bottle of shellac dried out), and I've been soaking the nib in clean water for the last couple of days. I can't wait to get it up and running! 51 Vac, broad stub nib by Robin Inkysloth, on Flickr 51 Vac, broad stub nib by Robin Inkysloth, on Flickr
  18. I have just received a beautiful restored Parker Vacumatic in the mail from Ebay. Got it for $83. It has a nasty strong perfume odor on the body and cap. I tried cleaning it with windex, light laundry soap and soft sponge, and alcohol wipes. Also tried "Pet Odor Remover" which normally takes any organic smell away. And, it still reeks so bad that my hand smells from holding it. Questions: 1. Can the smell be removed? . . . How? 2. Is the smell absorbed into the plastic? 3. Should I just try to return it? Thanks for your help. jim
  19. It appears that there are two major versions of the pen. One appears to have a diaphragm filler like a Parker Vacumatic. Then there's what looks like a short stroke piston-fill variant. Were there problems with the vacumatic filler? I fancied one of the vac-fill 601's. My choice is not assisted by the sellers somewhat vague usage of the term 'vacumatic'.
  20. Long before TV became common, in 1941, Parker used the idea of "television" to describe its visible ink supply through the barrel. Maybe this is well-known, but it was the first I heard of a visible ink supply called television!
  21. I have a 1938 Parker Vacumatic with the lockdown plunger. I recent had it sent away for a diaphragm replacement. In the process, the repairman had to rebuild the plunger as it had seen some wear and had presumably been repaired at some point in the past. Unfortunately, when the pen arrived back in the mail and I removed the blind cap, I was greeted by a snake-in-a-can of spring and plunger button shooting out of the pen. It seems the button on the end of the plunger came loose from the metal plunger tube, letting the spring free from its housing. I've seen a lot of pictures of mostly disassembled Vacumatics, but haven't seen photographic examples of the internal plunger components. So I thought I'd post a couple images and include some insights and questions regarding my current problem. Here are the parts as they came loose from the end of my pen. The spring fits inside the shaft (presumably with the metal inset piece at the bottom of the spring) and the brass button slides on top of the end of the spring and inside the end of the sleeve. http://sethkastner.net/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/VacSpring-300x200.jpg click image for full size Here is my fix for giving the button a better chance of bonding securely inside the shaft. I've alternated between two paper clips to gradually compress the spring by sticking one through the spring, via the lock-down slot and using the other to keep the spring held down against the top of the slot. This way, the spring is not in contact with or placing upward pressure on the cap as it is glued and left to dry. http://sethkastner.net/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/VacClip-300x200.jpg click image for full size Any input on what I should use to get the button to stay? I've been considering epoxy or even good old fashion Krazy Glue. Obviously I'll need some that can hold tight with only a small amount, and I'm not particularly concerned with being able to undo the bond easily. I will using this pen regularly but gingerly and I assume that if anymore work is needed on the Vacumatic system, I'll be needing to replace the whole shebang. Thoughts? Questions? Also here's a (badly lit) picture of the whole pen (fine, arrow nib; "shadow wave" finish). It was my wife's great-grandfather's and its my favorite of all my pens. http://sethkastner.net/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/DSC02460-300x200.jpg
  22. Nestorvass

    Parker 51 Dry

    I recently bought a Parker 51 Vacumatic. The pen was heavily used. However after, changing the filler unit, the diaphragm, cleaning the collector the breather tube and polishing, the pen looked like new. I was excited and all, filled it with Waterman Serenity Blue and begun writing with it. The line was very wet and the nib quite smooth (I did smooth it at a little). However after a few words the pen started to dry and then the inkflow stopped. I shook it a little, again wet line and after a few words dry. Does, anyone have any idea whats the problem and how can it be fixed. The nib has no baby's bottom, the collector feed and breather tube are super clean the nib is aligned with the feed and the collector slot. The only thing I suspect that may be causing this could be that the breather hole does not have a tiny hole on its side. The aerometric breather tube does so that tiny amounts of ink can flow to the feed. Are vacumatic breather tubes supposed to have a tiny hole on the bottom and the side, like the aerometric? If no is there any other reason I may have missed that causes the nib to run dry? Thanks in advance, Nestor
  23. Inkysloth

    Vacumatic Nib - Oblique?

    I bought a Vacumatic from someone on Ebay because the nib was too tempting to miss. It's a nice pen, and seems to be working, which is a surprise. I assumed it was unrestored, but it's also well polished (too well - the barrel markings are no longer visible). But both striped jewels are present, so I'm happy I think it's an oblique nib - happy to be corrected on this if it's not! Parker Vacumatic nib - oblique? by Robin Inkysloth, on Flickr Parker Vacumatic slender lockdown, grey by Robin Inkysloth, on Flickr
  24. My not-quite-mother-in-law asked me to identify this Parker pen she's had amongst her antiques. Problem is, I'm not really sure what it is. It's short. About 118mm, I think. I'm not sure if it's a sub junior, a debutante or something else. And I can't figure out what year it'd be. thoughts? The gold cardboard box in the photos might help, too... Thanks, all!
  25. Dmills

    Vac Pellet Cup Extractor

    I’ve been lurking for a while now but finally felt I had something worthwhile to post. I’ve been collecting pens (mostly Parkers) for a few years and recently decided to jump in a restore a few of them. I’ve restored a few of my Duofolds and Vac’s over the last year with the help of the generous contributions on this site as well as the many great pen resources on the web. I recently acquired a Parker Senior Duovac and had it disassemble and cleaned when I noticed the pump spring was heavily corroded and had separated. Dang! What to do now? A bit more searching turned up a few sites with replacement springs and pellet cups for sale and the most common recommendation seemed to be that the existing pellet cup usually had to be cut off of the filler plunger in order to install a new spring as it is generally very difficult to remove the cup without damaging either the cup or the plunger shaft. Seemed a waste to destroy a perfectly good cup so I decided to see if I could come up with a pellet cup extractor. The jig materials were some simple scrap from my wood shop – a piece of 2x4, a threaded eye bolt, the end of a drill bit and some copper sheet. I selected a drill bit with a diameter a few thousands smaller than the filler plunger diameter and used the bit to countersink a hole in the end of the eye bolt. I then cut a section off the shank of the same bit and inserted it into the drill hole to serve as the ram. I warmed the pellet cup up once mounted in the jig to 150 degrees for a few minutes monitored by a digital thermometer and then slowly turned the eye bolt and pushed the plunger shaft out the back of the pellet cup. No big issues except that one of the slot legs on the end of the plunger shaft was slightly bent over but I think that can be straightened with a little more heat with I reassemble. So, my rough little jig seems to have worked at least on this first attempt. Anyone else used something similar with good results? Is the pellet cup reattachment usually done with a dab of shellac? Thanks.





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