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  1. I post my Waterman Phileas pen and ink drawings at www.twelvedrawings.com Some background: I create drawings based on words associated with Twelve Step recovery. I use definitions found in a 1934 Webster's dictionary because some subtle changes have occurred since the AA Big Book was published in 1939. Pen and ink drawing have been a staple of popular art for centuries. I hope the artform will always endure—despite the advent of new computer software. There is a rather timeless quality about pen and ink drawings that can blur the lines between historical periods. That timelessness is an effect I deliberately try to achieve. Why? Becauase if I had one wish, it would be to help the younger reader look beyond the antique-sounding vocabulary found in recovery literature like the Big Book. Within that "grandfatherly" writing can be found very specific, definite, and practical instructions for those who wish to be freed from alcholic and addictive insanity. These illustrations are how I carry that message. I use 9 x 12" paper and a medium Waterman fountain pen—like the one seen in the drawing called "Difference"*. You will probably notice pencil sketch marks here and there on the drawings. I try to erase them because they are distracting to some people. To be honest, I draw mostly for my Higher Power and thankfully He has the job of being perfect, not me.
  2. TwelveDrawings

    Is Phileas Well Suited For Drawing?

    Sasha Royale, Hmm. What an interesting question—one I can answer only for my own experience creating www.TwelveDrawings.com Fountain pens are much more closely associated with writing than with drawing. In fact, I don't personally know any artists who use a fountain pen. I am pleased to find artists here on the Fountain Pen Network, but I think fountain pen usage is probably rare in the general population of artists. WHY NOT USE PENCIL? First, I should explain why I prefer using pen and ink vs a pencil. I can and do use pencil for sketching but have always preferred the demands and rewards of pen and ink. I would compare pencil use with skydiving, where there is real excitement involved but also ample room for correcting minor errors. Pen and ink is more like B.A.S.E. jumping which is very unforgiving of even the smallest mistake. (Not that I am brave enough to actually try either dangerous sport for real). Every mark or motion made by a pen will remain visible in the final drawing, so there is a bit of risktaking in each new stroke of a pen. WHY NOT USE A CALIGRAPHY PEN? This one you already know. The chisel-shaped nib required to make those wonderful letter forms is not well-suited for my style of illustration. WHY NOT USE A TECHNICAL PEN? Most pen and ink artists I know are fond of Rapidograph technical pens https://d2npbuaakacvlz.cloudfront.net/images/uploaded/large-present/2012/7/13/rapidograph-pens-1342201371.jpg These unique pens were used worldwide for creating architectural blueprints and engineering drawing. They come in an astonishing array of nib widths, but are must be held almost perpendicular to the page, rather than in an oblique handwriting position. Although I love Rapidographs, I prefer a pen that lets me use a relaxed handwriting grip.....thus, I use a Phileas. WHY NOT A MORE EXPENSIVE FOUNTAIN PEN THAN PHILEAS? Here I must declare a tiny bit of Divine intervention. I had only a brief interest in fountain pen as a child. Then, in middle age, I came across a display of Phileas pens in the Staples office supply store. I was mostly an idle doodler at that time, so I'm not sure why I suddenly wanted to own the Phileas. Its $50 price tag seemed absurdly high since my favorite drawing pen at the time was a $1.49 Pilot RazorPoint felt-tip pen. I took the plunge and bought what for me was an exorbidant luxury item. (Only much, much later did I learn that the Phileas is viewed by connoisseurs as a low-end "economy model" pen.) I was mesmerized by the very things that Waterman had purposely included...nostalgic Art Deco styling, glossy black enamel, and gleaming gold details. I don't usually collect "bling", but I liked owning this one particular bit of dazzle. WHY NOT A LESS EXPENSIVE PEN? I have formed a loyal bond with the Phileas. My devotion is not entirely rational, but it harms no one that I don't seek out less-expensive alternatives. WHAT'S TO LIKE ABOUT THE PHILEAS? • FEEL: Looks aside, I found the Phileas to have an excellent "feel" when writing or drawing. Other than my one childhood pen (a Sheaffer?), I have no basis for comparison. Today, I realize I was not alone in admiring the smooth performance of Phileas. The high-end Waterman designers seem to done a remarkable job when they created this low-end pen. It writes cleanly, delivers ink reliably, is physically rugged (when the cap is firmly on), and very easy to maintain. • CONSISTENCY: Like most ink illustrators, I primarily use dots (stippling) and lines (hatching) in my illustrations. A typical fountain pen is meant to create handwriting, but there are plenty of dots and lines in that. However, when I am drawing, I work very very fast. My Phileas must deliver up to 200+ dots per minute—that's averages 12,000 strokes per hour. Multiply that by 2 to 8 hours per drawing, times 70+ drawings and you'll see I am putting my Phileas through torture-test conditions. I have never "worn out" a Phileas pen. I have lost one and ruined two (accidentally dropping them nose-down onto concrete), but they work as well when old as they did new. • DIVERSITY: The afore-mentioned Rapidograph technical pens deliver a consistent, near-perfect round ink dot with each tap. That's why so many artists love them. When I draw, I am improvising constantly and do not want to see a perfect uniformity in my pen marks. The Phileas is capable of drawing very neatly, but it can also deliver scratchy, sloppy, and even wild lines given the right drawing technique. When I examine my stippling under a mangnifier, I am amazed that no two dots look alike. That would drive perfectionists crazy, perhaps, but I like it in a jazzy improvisational sort of way. Thank you for asking a very interesting question, Sasha Royale. I had never given any of the above much thought before. I know there are many much-finer pens in the world. But by Divine intervention or just plain luck, I found the right one for me (and my budget) on the first try. Since I am a pen user, not a collector, I am contented to stop with what I've got. I am curious how other fountain pen artists would answer your question. TweveDrawings
  3. Hello. I have been using Waterman Phileas fountain pens to create several series of drawings related to the Twelve Steps of recovery. Some are posted here on FPN at https://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/index.php/topic/251131-twelve-drawings-with-waterman-phileas/ The original 1930s AA literature made more sense to me after I bought a 1930s era dictionary. After some prayer and meditation, I began using pen and ink to call attention to these insightful definitions. Call me crazy, but my time spent drawings keeps me out of the pool halls! I have loved and lost several Phileas pens. That's because I insist on carrying them in a pocket when they would be much safer in a desk drawer or special carrying case. I want the pen to be handy because my busy family life leaves me only a few moments at a time to work on my drawings. I am working on my seventh series of TwelveDrawings. The various series are titled: 1. The Serenity Prayer 2. The Steps 3. The Promises 4. The Metaphors 5. The Insanities 6. Religious or Not? 7. The Traditions The first four series are on my website at www.TwelveDrawings.com Many of the others are posted in my Twitter profile at @twelvedrawings I'm not suggesting that this subject matter will or should interest you. I created the drawings for my Higher Power. But if you find one that "speaks" to you, download it free for your personal use. — TwelveDrawings.com





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