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  1. Tibaldi Impero Celluloid and Its Imitaors Tibaldi Impero celluloid is regarded by many pen collectors as the most beautiful material ever used for fountain pens. OMAS Arco Bronze may be the only other material in its class. Although the original Tibaldi company has been out of business for some years, rods of the Impero material have been somewhat available until relatively recently. The unavailability of genuine Impero rods may be why some resins that more or less explicitly emulate Impero celluloid’s appearance have appeared in several pen makers lines. I have a couple in my collection, and I will share photos comparing them with the real thing. The first of these to come to my attention was the “Blue Sorrento” resin used by Leonardo Officina Italiana in one of their Momento Zero issues. Leonardo did not promote this as resembling Impero, but the material reminded my of Impero, although it was more blue and a lot less black. The second was a Carina 14 from Atelier Lusso (Eric Sands) in the very attractive “Faux Tibaldi” resin cast by Jonathan Brooks. Although that material had some sparkly bits, it did have more of the Impero “feel” than the Italian resin used by Leonardo. Most recently, Brian Gray, owner of the Edison Pen Company, announced a new material in their “Production” Collier series, carried by their dealers. Brian called the material “Nighthawk.” He explicitly compared and contrasted this material to Tibaldi Impero.I found the photos most attractive and ordered a Collier in this material. When I put it side-by-side with my Leonardo Momento Zero Blue Sorrento, I discovered the two pens were made in the exact same material. The general feel of both Brooks’ Faux Tibaldi” and the Italian resin used by Leonardo and Edison are similar. Putting them next to each other, you see their differences quite clearly. I hope you find the photos interesting. Top to bottom :Lusso Pens Carina 14, Edison Pen Company Collier, Leonardo Momento Zero, Stipula for Mercury (a LE of 50 started by Tibaldi itself but completed by Stipula after Tibaldi's demise.) All these pens have italic nibs are a pleasure to write with, but that's another story for another day. David
  2. bbs

    New Tibaldi Bononia

    Hi, has anyone else seen the new version of the Bononia that Tibaldi is introducing? The red/orange one looks pretty good, and the feed is ebonite. http://www.giardino.it/pens/tibaldi/bononia.php?utm_source=4Dem&utm_medium=Email-Marketing-4Dem&utm_content=Subscriber%2315968&utm_campaign=Prevendita%20EN%20Visconti%20e%20Tibaldi
  3. Or lifestyle brand for the new millenials? https://www.tibaldi.com/it/homehttps://www.instagram.com/tibaldi.official/ Plastic is the new Celluloid Sadly, not a gray hair in sight Tibaldi N60 Blu Samarkand fountain pen courtesy of Novelli The steel on ebonite c/c filler does have me weak in the knees with aching pang of a Modello Transparente facade Kinda doing a Leonardo Momento Zero play with classic line and affordable price. https://youtu.be/fU1taIo_P4g
  4. I've been fortunate enough to get my hands on some rods of the splendid Tibaldi Impero Celluloid. It took 5 months and filing a PayPal claim before I was actually able to receive the material I'd paid for. When it finally arrived, I couldn't resist taking time the very next day to make a pen for myself. I chose a Medium Idyll, clipless, with a black Japanese ebonite section so I wouldn't risk staining this lovely celluloid. I filled it up with Sailor Yama-Dori, and it has quickly become my personal favorite pen. (Edited to correct spelling.)
  5. Family Portrait It is no secret that I have been a fan and supporter of Conid’s Bulkfiller since the very beginning. When news began to filter through FPN that a new filling mechanism that would provide over double the capacity of its competitors was being designed by one of our own, I felt it was my obligation as an avid user to support the fledgling endeavour. Nearly two and a half years ago, I received my FPR (First Production Run) demonstrator Bulkfiller; a year later I added a second: a black delrin streamline. Then came word that a new model was being developed - an ebonite oversize - and that a special edition in vintage Tibaldi Imperial Celluloid was planned in very limited numbers. I immediately contacted Werner and, a few months later, the pen arrived in Israel. That beautiful celluloid... If I have previously had one criticism of my Bulkfillers, it is that the choice of materials never quite lived up to the unique promise of the pen itself. Although my other Bulkfillers are attractive in a simple, Bauhaus, manner, the clear acrylic and delrin lack that pizzazz that infects so many Japanese and Italian pens. Both are fantastically functional (the delrin especially), but they are pens you respect, rather than love. Not so the Flanders LE. The kingsize itself is quite a departure from the established Conid norm: gone are the ruler-straight lines, the slightly extreme length, the twin washers to securely hold the cap when posted. Instead, it is almost sensual, its slightly tapering cap and barrel expertly polished to a flawless sheen to best display the electric blue veins rippling through the celluloid. It has transformed the Bulkfiller into a truly covetable item, and I look forward to future offerings straying from the traditional black. Hand engraved... And, true to Conid’s manner, the machining is flawless. I have never come across any pen by any manufacturer as well put together as a factory-fresh Bulkfiller. There is absolutely no play in the parts, and everything is designed to last forever while being easily user-disassembled for service and cleaning. It is obvious that Francis, the pen’s designer, is as involved in manufacturing as design, because the intelligence of the engineering solutions, and the attention to detail, is astonishing. Nowhere is this more clearly visible than in the clip: produced from a single solid block of titanium, it no doubt cost a fortune to develop and manufacture, and will survive a nuclear winter. That clip: precision engineering, like everything else... Though it is invisible in this specific model, the mechanism is a creation of equal beauty. I remember when my first Bulkfiller arrived, I thought that perhaps it was an unnecessary over-complication. I could not have been more wrong. Unscrew the blind cap, pull out the rod, rotate left to lock, push in, pull out, rotate right to unlock, push in the rod, close blind cap. Done. Now, after two years of use, I can fill any of these pens blind, in an instant, and with clean hands. Francis’s ingenious bend in the titanium rod ensures that I have never suffered from those wandering air-bubbles that frequently reek havoc with my Pilot 823 and Onotos. The dual reservoir also allows me to feed or drain the nib and feed of ink at will (by opening the blind cap and pointing the nib either up or down), meaning that I have never ever suffered an explosion, leak, or inky fingers with any of my Conid pens even after dozens of flights and thousands of miles travelled. All this with over 2ml of ink capacity in even the smallest model - a monstrous 3ml in this kingsize model. The blind cap. The only criticism I have of this pen is the nib. The EF size 6 titanium nib in my delrin streamline (produced by Bock and user replaceable) is one of my best writers: not too wet, not too dry, smooth as silk. So of course I had to order the same in size 8 for this Kingsize. Unfortunately, lightning doesn't strike twice: it is not as much to my liking, being a bit too wet and a little rough. The nibs are user-replaceable and can be purchased in ss, gold or titanium (the last two only for the Kingsize). Note the empty second reservoir. The ebonite feed. No doubt as soon as I have published this review, Francis and/or Werner will contact me to ask why I haven’t notified them, and will offer an instant and completely satisfactory solution (this is the kind of incredible service you get from Conid included in the price of admission), but I wanted to give a fair view of what to expect out of the box. It is, and remains, my only criticism of this most incredible pen. Writing sample on Rhodia with Montblanc Lavender ink. Note the full reservoir (without refilling the pen). No, I lie. I have two criticisms, though the second is not reeeeallly directly relevant... Too much... I usually don’t mention packaging much. I am a user, not a collector, and so feel that boxes etc are to pens what cellophane and plastic are to fruit: an unnecessary waste. I understand that this pen is a labour of love, designed in Belgium to honour the millions lost as WWI ravaged Flanders, but despite the effort, care and attention to detail, all the dog tags, the USB sticks and the unique box (no doubt costing Conid an arm and a leg) are completely superfluous. Less is more, and I feel that pen would have been as impressive (perhaps more) with a simple wooden box (see Onoto/Nakaya/MontblancPOA), perhaps with an included poppy. But, as I said and as you know, packaging means nothing. Cost, however, does. I paid comfortably double the price of a ‘standard’ ebonite kingsize for this LE. Some of that is no doubt down to the material, some to the (unnecessary) packaging, and some (hopefully) is easy revenue towards the development of the cheaper and more mass-produced Bulkfillers. While I consider the standard ebonite Kingsize a well-priced pen (and would urge anyone in the market for a Montblanc 149 or Pelikan M1000 to give one a chance), this LE was a pure, glorious indulgence, one for which I have no regrets. I would do it again in a heartbeat. I have been travelling heavily recently, and it is no coincidence that my Visconti three pen case has been filled with my three Conids. Since the Bulkfiller’s inception, they have always been the most functional pens you can buy. However, with the LE's celluloid and the Kingsize's more elegant design, the Bulkfiller is a pen you can now buy with your heart as much as your head. Does that make it the best pen in the real-world? There’s a pretty good argument to be made for that…
  6. I purchased this pen from Regina Martini because of the beautiful celluloid material, her assertion that it was a Stipula product and the availability of a Stipula 1.1 mm italic nib for it. I began looking for documentation of this pen's provenance after I had committed to the purchase. I was able to find quite a bit, but some facts remain unsettled. As best I can determine, Mercury was a luxury goods manufacturer and retailer established in Belgium in 1948. In 2002, the company was sold by the descendants of the founder. It was still in business in 2007, when my pen was produced, but appears to have subsequently closed. I don't know when. Mercury bought materials from manufacturers and assembled pens which were then sold under their name. Tibaldi was an important supplier of manufactured parts, including parts made from some of their famous celluloids. The Mercury "Francois des Trixhes" model utilized Tibaldi's Grey/Blue "Impero" celluloid. Eighty pens were made. However, it seems that the Tibaldi company itself went out of business before production was complete. My pen post-dates the Tibaldi closure. The pen is made with the same Tibaldi parts as the earlier numbers in the series. However, it is fitted with a Stipula nib and converter and was packaged in a Stipula box. I have seen claims that Mercury bought up Stipula's manufactured parts when the latter went out of business. Whether Mercury or Stipula actually assembled the pen is unclear. In any case, it is a beautiful pen. It appears to have impeccable fit and finish. It writes like a dream, as I expected from prior experience with a number of Stipula 14Kt gold 1.1mm italic nibs. How about some photos? Regular red Stipula pen box The pen sits in splendid isolation Mercury's engraving. Note that other reviews I have read show photos of pens with serial numbers lower that 40 which have Bock nibs with or without Tibaldi's name. All are xx/80 however. The pen came with a Stipula-branded converter already in the pen. The nib! I am very happy with this pen, but I remain quite curious about the history of its production. I am also curious about the model name. So far, I have been unable to find anything about "Francois des Trixhes," presumably a person after whom this model was named. One FPN topic said this model was produced in celebration of the 175th anniversary of Belgium. I am no expert on Belgian history (to say the least!), but my reading indicates that the modern nation was "born" out of a rebellion in 1830. 1830 + 175 = 2005. That is about right, although in another topic I read the pen was produced in 2007. A minor discrepancy, to my thinking. I would therefore suspect that M. F. des Trixhes was a Belgian historical figure who played some significant role in the creation of modern Belgium. "Trixhes" is a Belgian geographic name, so I assume Francois or his family was from there. Any one who can shed light on these mysteries is invited to do so. Meanwhile ... Happy writing! David
  7. visvamitra

    Magenta - Tibaldi

    Tibaldi is company I know littlle about, however they seem to claim to be the first and most important Italian factory of fountain pens. Tibaldi & Company was founded in October 1916 by Giuseppe Tibaldi who offered reasonably priced pens. After his death in 1935 the company new owner Remo Pagliuca focused ion narrowing the line of pens and to offer pens that used components from other companies (to lower production cost). It didn't pay out - in 1960s Tibaldy practically disappeared from the market. Aquila Brands owns Tibaldi, and has a mission to provide a portfolio of brands whose common denominator is quality, design, technology, performance, charm and innovation, and which are distinguishable by their identity, philosophy and market positioning. Tibaldi nicely meets that mission. In 1990 it emerged again for a brief time. In 2005 Aquila family took over the company and Tibaldi returned to the market place. Tibaldi now offers luxury fountain pens. I've never held one in the hand so I'm not able to share any valuable opinion concerning their quality. However thanks to Michael R. I had a chance to try few of their inks. Magenta is quite vivid color. Drops of ink on kitchen towel Software ID Tomoe River, Kaweco Classic Sport, B Leuchtturm1917, Kaweco Classic Sport, B Lyreco Budget, Kaweco Classic Sport, B
  8. visvamitra

    Black - Tibaldi

    Tibaldi is company I know littlle about, however they seem to claim to be the first and most important Italian factory of fountain pens. Tibaldi & Company was founded in October 1916 by Giuseppe Tibaldi who offered reasonably priced pens. After his death in 1935 the company new owner Remo Pagliuca focused ion narrowing the line of pens and to offer pens that used components from other companies (to lower production cost). It didn't pay out - in 1960s Tibaldy practically disappeared from the market. Aquila Brands owns Tibaldi, and has a mission to provide a portfolio of brands whose common denominator is quality, design, technology, performance, charm and innovation, and which are distinguishable by their identity, philosophy and market positioning. Tibaldi nicely meets that mission. In 1990 it emerged again for a brief time. In 2005 Aquila family took over the company and Tibaldi returned to the market place. Tibaldi now offers luxury fountain pens. I've never held one in the hand so I'm not able to share any valuable opinion concerning their quality. However thanks to Michael R. I had a chance to try few of their inks. Black isn't particularly thrilling nor blackest. It behaves well though. Drops of ink on kitchen towel Software ID Tomoe River, Kaweco Classic Sport, B Leuchtturm1917, Kaweco Classic Sport, B Compared
  9. Hi all guys, i may have the opportunity to purchase a Tibaldi Iride with a Medium or a Fine18k nib, since i have a small handwriting i only use xf or fine nibs, i was wondering is something can provide a writing sample of 18k tibaldi nib of any size compared to a well known pen or tell me his experience with tibaldi 18k nibs. If I am not mistaken i read here of fpn that i can simply pull out the nib and the feed of the iride and swapping the out with something else but i am not a fan of frankenpens and i'd prefer to use the original nibs. To sum up are these nibs true to their size or are they more like visconti ones?
  10. http://i.imgur.com/Rztd5EX.jpg My Scriptorium custom arrived yesterday! I was at school when it arrived and then had work immediately after, so it was past midnight when I could finally ink it up. It's beautiful! The camphor smell is just beguiling. The pen has a sterling silver roll-stop, which Renee commissioned from her silversmith. I ordered the pen with two nibs, a fine and a medium - both are rhodium-plated 18kt gold. You can see the Scriptorium "S" shield logo engraved on the nib. Being celluloid, it could possibly stain. I ordered a spare black ebonite section, to prepare for that possibility. I could not find any instances of the Tibaldi Impero celluloid staining, but it's a possibility and I figured a spare section was a good idea. http://i.imgur.com/UJxnbon.jpg It's really hard to capture the depth of the material. This photo is taken with as much focus as I could get with my shaky hands. I had asked for a pen in the flat-top Romillo style with a circular roll-stop. This was a custom order but Renee liked the model and added it to her lineup under the name Aeterna, which means "everlasting, eternal" in Latin. This is a medium-size pen on her pen dimensions chart. Renee did a fantastic job. I've been fortunate enough to own custom pens by some of the other pen craftsman and Renee's craftsmanship definitely holds its own. http://i.imgur.com/lP9TXFw.jpg This one is taken with HDR on. As you turn the pen in you hands, light plays inside the chipped ice pattern with deep blue veins and it's just stunning. I've so far just used the medium nib and inked it up with Diamine Damson. It's a wonderfully smooth writer! http://i.imgur.com/FkpI5dJ.jpg Here's the Aeterna compared to a few other pens I had close by. From left: Hakumin/Edison Pearl, Shawn Newton custom, Romillo Eo #9, Scriptorium Aeterna (medium-size), and Eboya Kyouka (medium-size). I'll do an in-depth review when I've had some more time to use it.
  11. Susan3141

    Tibaldi Modello 60 Issues

    I own a Tibaldi Modello 60. Today, I noticed that the pen was writing dry, and I thought that maybe it was low on ink. I emptied the pen (it still had plenty of ink, so maybe the nib just dried out a bit). But, when I turned the piston to remove the ink and to rinse the pen, the nib unit turned along with the piston each time I reached either the fill point or the empty point. This worried me. I emptied and filled the pen with water several times, and each time the nib unit turned. The last few times I emptied and refilled, the nib unit remained stable. Does anyone know what might be going on? The pen seems to write okay, though I noticed that ink leaked into the cap. I don't know if that happened after I refilled it with ink today, or if it leaked on the prior fill. Thanks, Susan
  12. Tasmith

    Tibaldi Desk Pen Question

    Picked up this Tibaldi desk pen yesterday at a yard sale. The imprint on the barrel says: "Tibaldi 26-L D.65-001". Tried to research it on the Internet, but could not find any information about this pen. Does anyone know about this pen? I paid $4.00 for it. Images: Back lit the translucent body to show the dried out sac:
  13. My recently-repaired, and much travelled Iride has lost some of the gold plating from the clip during its journeys. I don't think the clip is 're-plateable' but I read that a couple of owners have had terminal failures of the celluloid barrels, and I wondered if anyone has a complete Iride cap or a fully-plated clip going spare? Please let me know if you have. They are not common pens so i guess such spares will be hard to find ... I just thought it was worth an enquiry. Thanks
  14. Jadie

    Ruelala February Pen Sale

    It's here again. Ruelala has another load of fountain pens (and ballpoints/rollerballs) on sale at their website. Mostly Montegrappa, Tibaldi, and Chopard pens, at discounted prices. http://www.ruelala.com/event/92286?aid=1023&edid=TSH4RF-XF0H2-IR00Z1-YK9J9S-NRBZOV-v1&program=0&cm_mmc_o=HETzTwFwEf*vv+-4+PBAfb6Aw+R5wE*dwFzkw+JEgkzllbubwp*E%2Fz





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