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  1. yazeh

    Taccia Momo Pink

    This ink was part of blind ink testing on another pen site. It's fun testing inks without knowing anything about them. It removes a lot of preconceived ideas about certain brands... For my first Taccia ink, I got an unapologetic screaming pink It’s fun ink for washes for accents, but I don't see myself writing it. It has the subtlety of a bubblegum Just check the chroma: Writing samples: TR 68 gr Mnemosyne Rhodia Midori - Note feed was saturated... on the 2nd line... This is a cheap Hilroy notebook. The paper is so absorbent that you can have ghosting with pencil marks Note bleed through and ghosting but then almost anything bleeds through on this paper... Dry time: It was quite long on Rhodia. But then Jinhao 450s are very wet pens. So take it with a grain of salt: I also added a naïve drawing I did as part of yearly Inktober... The prompt I believe was tooth... I went for tooth fairy... Comparison: Mystery 45 is Momo Pink.. it's very close to Diamine Hope Pink... Water test: · Pens used: Jinhao 450 (medium /fude) · Shading: On some paper... · Ghosting: None · Bleed through: On cheap paper yes. · Flow Rate: Good · Lubrication: Decent · Nib Dry-out: Not noticed · Start-up: Not noticed · Saturation: Pink · Shading Potential: With wide nib on good paper. But good luck with that. · Sheen: Apparently there’s some gold sheen in heavy application. · Spread / Feathering / Woolly Line: Not noticed · Nib Creep / “Crud”: No · Staining (pen): I doubt it. · Clogging: Nope. · Water resistance: Meh! · Availability: 40 ml bottles
  2. namrehsnoom

    TACCIA Ukiyo-e Hokusai koiai

    TACCIA Ukiyo-e Hokusai koiai TACCIA is a Japanese stationery company, that is part of the Nakabayashi group. They offer high-quality fountain pens, inks, pen-rolls, notebooks, etc. More specifically, TACCIA produce a line of inks, inspired by the unique look of Ukiyo-e paintings from Japan’s Edo period (17th century). Ukiyo-e paintings are woodblock prints where the work of an artist is carved into wood by woodworkers and pressed onto paper by printers. This allows the production of multiple prints of an artwork with some different colours as well. In this review, the spotlight is on koiai, a dark indigo blue with a heavy reddish-purple sheen. The colour is inspired by the blue tones in the world-famous painting “The Great Wave of Kanagawa”, painted by the Japanese artist Katsushika Hokusai (1760-1849). It is the best-known painting in his “Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji” series. The breathtaking composition of this woodblock print ensures its reputation as an icon of world art. Hokusai cleverly played with perspective to make Japan’s grandest mountain appear as a small triangular mound within the hollow of the cresting wave. Koiai is a wet and saturated ink, that can appear very dark in writing. It’s not a blue-black though, but a deep dark blue that is moving a bit towards teal territory - without actually getting there. This is an ink that I have mixed feelings about. In wet pens & fine nibs, the ink is too saturated for my taste, and the resulting very dark blue shade doesn’t do much for me. But use this ink with dry pens and/or stub nibs, and it truly blossoms, showing a wonderful indigo blue. You definitely need to hunt for the right pen/nib combination, but this extra bit of work is totally worth it. Koiai is also an ink with a fabulous reddish-purple sheen, that shows on many types of paper. Lovely! The ink comes in a 40 ml bottle, that is packaged in a beautiful box showing the corresponding Ukiyo-e painting. Lovely packaging for an excellent ink. To show you the impact of saturation on the ink’s look & feel on paper, I made some scribbles where I really saturated portions of a strip of 52 gsm Tomoe River paper with ink. This gives you a good idea of what the ink is capable of in terms of colour range. Koiai has a fairly narrow colour span, quickly moving from a stunning indigo-blue to a very saturated dark blue. Not a lot of shading in this ink, but instead you get lots of sheen in the saturated parts of the letter forms. This ink is a true sheening monster! This TACCIA ink works wonderfully well with my Edison Collier Nighthawk 1.1 stub – a beautiful indigo-blue, loads of sheen, and the pen’s colour matches the ink perfectly. I love it when all these details combine together for a wonderful experience… writer’s heaven! The ink’s chromatography shows a complex mix of dyes, with grey, purple, teal and sky-blue components in the mix. From the bottom part of the chroma you can deduce that all colour will disappear from the page when the ink comes into contact with water, leaving only a grey ghost of your writing. This is confirmed in the water test – colour washes away, with a grey-blue residue clinging to the paper, that remains quite readable. By no means a water-proof ink, but one that can survive a small accident. I’ve tested the ink on a wide variety of paper – from crappy Moleskine to high-end Tomoe River. On every small band of paper I show you: An ink swab, made with a cotton Q-tip 1-2-3 pass swab, to show increasing saturation An ink scribble made with an M-nib Lamy Safari The name of the paper used, written with a B-nib Lamy Safari A small text sample, written with the M-nib Safari Source of the quote, written with an Edison Collier 1.1 stub Drying times of the ink on the paper (with the M-nib Safari) Koiai looks good on both pure white and yellow-cream paper. The ink handles crappy paper well: on Moleskine I saw almost zero feathering, and even see-through and bleed-through are minimal. Drying time are quite long (15-25 seconds) on hard-surface paper, but on more absorbent paper the ink tends to dry almost immediately. This means you can use koiai as an office ink – I’ve used it in my Kaweco Liliput EDC pens with EF nib, and it worked perfectly on the lousy copy paper at work. I’ve also added a photo to give you another view on the ink. Scanned images and photos often capture different aspects of the ink’s colour & contrast. That’s why I present them both. In this case, the photo shows the ink a bit too dark, while the scans come closest to what my eyes can see. Writing with different nib sizes The picture below shows the effect of nib sizes on the writing. The top lines are written with my dry-writing Lamy Safari test pens and show a nice dark blue. The ink starts to blossom when you reach the broader nib sizes (B and stub-nib). With my Lamy Dialog 3 – a wet writer with M-nib – the ink gets too saturated for my taste and loses a lot of its appeal. Koiai provides low-to-medium shading. What the scan totally fails to capture is the tremendous amount of sheen – this has to be seen to believe. Related inks To compare koiai with related inks, I use my nine-grid format with the currently reviewed ink at the center. This format shows the name of related inks, a saturation sample, a 1-2-3 swab and a water resistance test – all in a very compact format. There are quite a number of similar-looking inks in my collection, so colourwise this koiai is not a must have. But that sheen… totally makes it worth it to own a bottle of this TACCIA brew. Inkxperiment – Romeo and Juliet With every review, I try to create a drawing using only the ink I am reviewing. These small one-ink pieces are an excellent way to show the colour-range nuances that are hidden within the ink. And every inkxperiment provides me with a couple of fun hours of quality time. Inspiration for this inkxperiment comes from the “Wyrd Sisters” – a Terry Pratchett novel with lots of references to Shakespeare’s Hamlet and King Lear. But also, a love story between the young witch Magrat and the King’s Fool – one that made me think of Romeo and Juliet. The inkxperiment expresses Romeo’s desperation while trying to reach his Juliet. For this drawing, I started with an A4 piece of 300 gsm watercolour paper. I divided the paper in square grids and used the age-old potato stamp (known from kindergarten times) to print a background of squares using different water/ink ratios. I then used a plastic card to add labyrinth lines to the drawing, and with a glass dip pen added Romeo and Juliet. Technically a really simple drawing, but I like the end result that gives you a good idea of what can be achieved with koiai as a drawing ink. Inkxpired – computational art I love experimenting with pen/ink/paper and have added another layer as part of the hobby. I’m exploring computational art, inspired by the ink drawings I do during ink reviews. Another fun offshoot of the hobby… and all that starting with a few drops of dye-coloured water on paper. I made a square cut-out of the inkxperiment drawing and used a metallic filter to convert the drawing to black & white. Looks great on a 75x75cm canvas poster against a white-painted wall. Conclusion TACCIA Ukiyo-e Hokusai koiai is a dark indigo-blue ink with oodles of sheen. Not an ink for a wet writer though, because it tends to oversaturate. But combine it with a stub-nib in a dry pen and you will be in writer’s heaven! This is also a wonderful ink to draw with – I truly enjoyed experimenting with it. Not the best TACCIA ink, but certainly worth a try. Technical test results on Rhodia N° 16 notepad paper, written with Lamy Safari, M-nib Back-side of writing samples on different paper types
  3. namrehsnoom

    TACCIA Ukiyo-e Utamaro ume murasaki

    TACCIA Ukiyo-e Utamaro ume murasaki TACCIA is a Japanese stationery company, that - as far as I know - is now part of the Nakabayashi group. They offer high-quality fountain pens, inks, pen-rolls, notebooks, etc. More specifically, TACCIA produce a line of inks, inspired by the unique look of Ukiyo-e paintings from Japan’s Edo period (17th century). Ukiyo-e prints are woodblock prints where the work of an artist is carved into wood by woodworkers, and pressed onto paper by printers. This allows the production of multiple prints of an artwork with some different colours as well. In this review, the star of the show is ume murasaki, a brown-purple-rose ink with an intriguing personality. The ink’s colour is inspired by the tones appearing in woodprint paintings from the Japanese artist Kitagawa Utamaro. The ink’s inspiration comes from a 1795 portrait of Okita, a waitress who worked at the Naniwaya teahouse near the Asakusa temple in Edo. Okita was one of the most famous beauties in Edo, and was frequently depicted by Utamaro. Ume murasaki has a beautiful brown-rose colour. The ink shows some intriguing tricks too – it’s a real chameleon, that can look totally different depending on pen-nib-paper combination and depending on the light source. I love it when inks show this type of complexity in their make-up! Ume murasaki translates to “plum purple” – myself I mostly see a brown-leaning old-rose that just looks lovely on pure white paper. This TACCIA ink writes fairly saturated – with a wet pen you get a fairly brown-leaning colour without much shading (due to the heavily saturated line). Use ume murasaki with a dry pen though, and it opens up in all its exquisite beauty: seducing old-rose tones, strong but not too contrast-rich shading that looks simply wonderful. As you might guess, this ink is totally to my liking and surely one of the most intriguing inks in the TACCIA Ukiyo-e series. The ink comes in a 40 ml bottle, that is packaged in a beautiful box showing the corresponding Ukiyo-e painting. Lovely packaging for an excellent ink. To show you the impact of saturation on the ink’s look & feel on paper, I made some scribbles where I really saturated portions of a strip of 52 gsm Tomoe River paper with ink. This gives you a good idea of what the ink is capable of in terms of colour range. Ume murasaki has a medium dynamic range, without too much contrast between the light and darker parts. This translates to soft but prominent shading, but only when using a dry pen. With wet pens, the increased saturation drowns out most of the shading. The ink is a real chameleon, whose colour is devilishly difficult to capture. Under my scanner it even looks purple! Below – from top to bottom: a photo taken in daylight, the purple scanner image, and a much more brown-leaning photo taken under artificial light. And yes… that’s all the same ink! This TACCIA ume murasaki looks best in daylight, so for this review I will show photos instead of scans. The ink’s chromatography shows a truly diverse mix of dyes, with rose, green, yellow and blue tones appearing. This already hints at the inherent complexity of ume murasaki. The result is a unique type of colour, that expresses itself with some real personality on the paper. TACCIA’s ink makers definitely show their craftsmanship with this creation. As can be seen from the bottom of the chromatography, this is not a water resistant ink, and as such not really suited for use at the office. Anyway… due to the purple scanning colour, this is not exactly an ink for use in a business setting. I’ve tested the ink on a wide variety of paper – from crappy Moleskine to high-end Tomoe River. On every small band of paper I show you: An ink swab, made with a cotton Q-tip 1-2-3 pass swab, to show increasing saturation An ink scribble made with an M-nib Lamy Safari The name of the paper used, written with a B-nib Lamy Safari A small text sample, written with the M-nib Safari Source of the quote, written with an Esterbrook Estie with 1.1. stub Drying times of the ink on the paper (with the M-nib Safari) Ume murasaki looks good on all types of paper, but it really excels when combined with pure white paper, where the lovely old-rose colour really comes to the front. The ink can handle all types of paper, with only the tiniest amount of feathering on crappy paper (like Moleskine, or cheap copy paper). With the low-quality paper also comes a fair amount of see-through and a tiny bit of bleed-through. You really need to combine this ink with drier pens – that brown old-rose colour with its lovely shading is really something to see! With wet pens, the increased saturation causes loss of depth, and shifts the ink to more brown-leaning tones. Drying times are surprisingly short for a wet-writing ink, and are around 10 seconds for most types of paper (with the M-nib Safari). Writing with different nib sizes The picture below shows the effect of nib sizes on the writing. The EF-nib already shows the shading that the ink is capable of. Depending on the nib's wetness, you get more earth-brown tones, but always a good-looking result. Shading truly is a feast for the eyes – it is not too heavy, but still prominently present, resulting in an aesthetically pleasing look. Related inks To compare ume murasaki with related inks, I use my nine-grid format with the currently reviewed ink at the center. This format shows the name of related inks, a saturation sample, a 1-2-3 swab and a water resistance test – all in a very compact format. The ink is different from other earth-toned ones in my collection. The closest I have is Super 5 Australia Red, but that one cannot match ume murasaki’s complexity. Inkxperiment – Let’s TOK about it With every review, I try to create an interesting drawing using only the ink I am reviewing. These small one-ink pieces are an excellent way to show the colour-range nuances that are hidden within the ink. And I totally enjoy the fun couple of hours these inkxperiments provide me. Inspiration for this inkxperiment comes from a children’s book I have been reading together with the 6 year old in the family. She’s just learning to read, and one of the first stories are about chickens (“kip” in Dutch – one of the first words they learned at school). This got me browsing on Pinterest, and I came across some more-or-less abstract chicken pics, that even I can manage. Et voilà … an inkxperiment is born. For this drawing, I started with a piece of A4 HP photo paper. I first drew the background, using some cotton pads and water-diluted ink. Next I drew the chicken shapes, using pure ume murasaki. I then used water-diluted bleach and applied it with cotton Q-tips to the chicken forms. The bleach reacts really well with ume murasaki, bringing out some nice purple tones. I finally used a piece of cardboard dipped in pure ink to draw the floor of the chicken farm. The final picture gives you an impression of what can be achieved with this TACCIA ink in a more artistic setting. Not bad at all… ume murasaki works really well when used as a drawing ink. Inkxpired – computational art I love experimenting with pen/ink/paper, and have added another layer as part of the hobby. I’m exploring computational art, inspired by the ink drawings I do during ink reviews. Another fun offshoot of the hobby… and all that starting with a few drops of dye-coloured water on paper. For this computational derivation, I first abstracted the scene a bit, and then used negative colour filters for different parts of the drawing. I’m fairly pleased with the result I got. Conclusion TACCIA Ukiyo-e Utamaro ume murasaki is a real chameleon that can look totally different depending on context. It looks at its best when used in the right setting (i.e. dry pens, white paper, daylight) – in that case you are rewarded with an exquisite brown old-rose colour and some great-looking shading. Also a great drawing ink, with tons of character. An ink with unexpected complexity, that has a lot going for it. I loved using it. In my opinion, this is an ink that really deserves your attention. Technical test results on Rhodia N° 16 notepad paper, written with Lamy Safari, M-nib Back-side of writing samples on different paper types
  4. A Smug Dill

    TACCIA Aizen Asamoya #017

    From the album: Japanese pens

    © A Smug Dill

  5. namrehsnoom

    TACCIA Ukiyo-e Hokusai sabimidori

    TACCIA Ukiyo-e Hokusai sabimidori TACCIA is a Japanese stationery company, that - as far as I know - is now part of the Nakabayashi group. They offer high-quality fountain pens, inks, pen-rolls, notebooks, etc. More specifically, TACCIA produce a line of inks, inspired by the unique look of Ukiyo-e paintings from Japan’s Edo period (17th century). Ukiyo-e prints are woodblock prints where the work of an artist is carved into wood by woodworkers, and pressed onto paper by printers. This allows the production of multiple prints of an artwork with some different colours as well. In this review, the centre stage is taken by sabimidori, a rust-green ink with a strong copper sheen, inspired by colours appearing in woodprint paintings from the Japanese artist Katsushika Hokusai (1760-1849). Hokusai is best known for his “Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji” series of prints, with the mountain appearing as a central theme. In this case, the rust-green colour is inspired by the colour of the tree-leaves in the painting of “the village of Sekiya on the Sumida river”. The Met museum describes the scene as: “the speed and urgency of the galloping horsemen stand in contrast to the solitary and static image of Fuji capping the horizon like an omniscient observer and marking that which is eternal. The raised road that winds into the depths of the print directs our gaze to the mountain, as do the trees that function as a framing device.” Sabimidori is not only a beautiful green-leaning teal, but also one with a number of tricks up its sleeve. Most surprisingly: the wet ink looks bright blue, but quicky dries to a muted blue-green. It’s definitely a teal, but one that leans strongly towards the green side – I really like the colour that coalesces from the bright blue liquid. Next, sabimidori – which means “rust green” – hasn’t stolen its name: the rust comes from the heavy copper sheen that the ink shows on many types of hard-surfaced paper. This TACCIA ink is also a heavy shader. Usually, I’m not a fan of heavy shading, which can look harsh and angry, but with blue-green inks the result can work really well. With sabimidori, you get an aesthetically pleasing look with blue undertones in the light parts and a green-copper look in the darker parts. These complement each other wonderfully well. As you might guess, this ink is totally to my liking and surely one of the better inks I tried this year. The ink comes in a 40 ml bottle, that is packaged in a beautiful box showing the corresponding Ukiyo-e painting. Lovely packaging for an excellent ink. To show you the impact of saturation on the ink’s look & feel on paper, I made some scribbles where I really saturated portions of a strip of 52 gsm Tomoe River paper with ink. This gives you a good idea of what the ink is capable of in terms of colour range. Sabimidori has a medium dynamic range, without too much contrast between the light and darker parts. The ink is special though: blue-leaning in the lighter part of the spectrum, and becoming greener the more it saturates. The red-copper sheen appears in the most saturated parts, and is even visible in a scan. The result is an ink that almost looks multichromatic, with really nice contrast in the shading. Shading is most obvious in wider nibs, but you already get some with the EF nib, which is quite impressive. The aesthetics are superb, and add tons of character to your writing. If you use high-sheen paper – like Tomoe River – and look at your writing from an angle, the “rust” component is very obvious. Sabimidori then looks like a blue ink, with a very prominent copper sheen. Wonderful stuff! TACCIA’s ink makers have really outdone themselves with this sabimidori. The ink’s chromatography shows a blue-heavy ink with yellow in the mix, which results in the green-looking appearance. From the chroma, I would have expected a more blue-leaning ink, not the rust-green teal that appears on paper. There definitely is some complex chemistry going on here! The bottom part of the chroma shows the bright blue that remains when water washes away the yellow dyes. This is confirmed in the water test: the ink is fairly resistant to water, and can survive an accident. A lot of the colour disappears, but a bright blue ghost of your writing remains that is quite readable, even after 30 seconds under streaming tap water. That makes sabimidori an ink you can use at the office – where it will certainly attract some well-deserved attention. I’ve tested the ink on a wide variety of paper – from crappy Moleskine to high-end Tomoe River. On every small band of paper I show you: An ink swab, made with a cotton Q-tip 1-2-3 pass swab, to show increasing saturation An ink scribble made with an M-nib Lamy Safari The name of the paper used, written with a B-nib Lamy Safari A small text sample, written with the M-nib Safari Source of the quote, written with a Pelikan M405 with cursive-italic F-nib Drying times of the ink on the paper (with the M-nib Safari) Sabimidori looks good on all types of paper, but I personally like it best on the more cream-coloured variety which enhances its green complexion. No feathering in general, just a teeny tiny bit on HP multipurpose paper. Some bleed-through on low-quality paper, but nothing too excessive. The ink expresses itself totally different, depending on the paper used – from blue- to green-leaning teal. I simply love this complexity … you get totally different experiences from a single bottle! Drying times for sabimidori are on the long side, with up to 30 seconds on hard-surface paper. I’ve also added a few photos to give you another view on the ink. Scanned images and photos often capture different aspects of the ink’s colour & contrast. That’s why I present them both. In this case, scan & photo are very close-matched, with the photo closest to what my eyes can see. One thing that I feel obliged to mention: sabimidori is not the easiest ink to clean out of your pens. It stains a lot, and needed extra effort to completely remove. It’s devilishly difficult to remove it from non-shiny plastic: I couldn’t completely clean it from re-used cartridges using only tap water: soap and hot water were needed. This is not an ink I would use in a clear demonstrator! Writing with different nib sizes The picture below shows the effect of nib sizes on the writing. The EF-nib already shows the shading that the ink is capable of. Depending on the nib, you get more blue or green, but always a good-looking result. Shading truly is a feast for the eyes – it is heavy, but the blue & green parts complement each other really well, resulting in an aesthetically pleasing look. Related inks To compare sabimidori with related inks, I use my nine-grid format with the currently reviewed ink at the center. This format shows the name of related inks, a saturation sample, a 1-2-3 swab and a water resistance test – all in a very compact format. The ink is different from other green-leaning teals in my collection. Murky Waters is a mix of my own: 3 parts Pelikan Edelstein Jade with 2 parts Edelstein Onyx. Inkxperiment – Cradle of Life With every review, I try to create a drawing using only the ink I am reviewing. These small one-ink pieces are an excellent way to show the colour-range nuances that are hidden within the ink. And I totally enjoy the fun couple of hours these inkxperiments provide me: playing around with the ink in a creative way. Not surprisingly, the inkxperiment is for me the most enjoyably part in the making of a review 😉 Inspiration for this inkxperiment comes from the namesake Lara Croft movie I revisited recently: a fun constant-action adventure movie. Definitely not a brainy movie, but the title got me thinking about the origins of life. In puddles of nutrient-rich water on infant Earth, complex molecules arose, that – given aeons of time and billions of tries – resulted in self-replicating structures, that ultimately form the building blocks of life. And from these humble beginnings come the variety of species we know today, like the majestic pine forest… For this drawing, I started with a piece of A4 HP photo paper. I first drew the land borders, drawing them with water into which I dripped pure ink. The colours are real… bright blue, bright green, teal – all this from that single sabimidori bottle. Next I created the sky for the pine forest, printing a pattern with a piece of kitchen paper dipped in ink. I then drew the spheres where the “life cooking” happened, that created the complex molecules. All that in puddles of nutrient-rich water, which I drew with Q-tips dipped in multiple water/ink ratios. Finally I used my fountain pen to draw the pine forests, and to add some texture to the water. The final picture gives you a good idea of what can be achieved with sabimidori as a drawing ink. Inkxpired – computational art I love experimenting with pen/ink/paper, and have added another layer as part of the hobby. I’m exploring computational art, inspired by the ink drawings I do during ink reviews. Another fun offshoot of the hobby… and all that starting with a few drops of dye-coloured water on paper. Conclusion TACCIA Ukiyo-e Hokusai sabimidori is a wonderful rust-green teal. An ink with unexpected complexity, that has a lot going for it. I love its looks on paper, with the great aesthetics of shading and sheen. This is one of the nicest inks I tried this year. If you like teals, you cannot go wrong with this one: highly recommended! Technical test results on Rhodia N° 16 notepad paper, written with Lamy Safari, M-nib Back-side of writing samples on different paper types
  6. TACCIA 8-pen Kimono Pen Roll (Mosaic pattern) TACCIA is a Japanese stationery company, that - as far as I know - is now part of the Nakabayashi group. They offer high-quality fountain pens, inks, pen-rolls, notebooks, etc. One of the products TACCIA produces are beautiful Kimono Pen Rolls, that are crafted with Nishijin Kinran, a traditional Japanese weaving technique that is in use since the 5th century. The patterns of these elegant Japanese pen wraps are inspired by the traditional Japanese Kimono robe. A couple of weeks ago, I bought the 8-pen version of this pen-roll in the Mosaic pattern, as a birthday present for myself. This TACCIA pen-roll fits two purposes: 1/ it’s a functional object designed to protect your pens, and 2/ it’s a thing of beauty with great aesthetics, that just gives you a lot of pleasure. Physically, it’s just an oversized pen-roll. The 8-pen version measures about 38 x 24 cm, and is made from tightly-woven thick polyester, fastened by a traditional rope and hook. Pens are kept in 8 suede slots, that can hold any size of pen (even really oversized ones). A suede cover flap keeps your pens in place, and protects the pens from one another when rolling up the pen-wrap. I typically use this pen-roll in one of two ways. Either I do a classic roll-up, where you end up with a more-or-less circular bundle of about 6 cm in diameter. Or I do a 3-fold wrap, where you end up with a flat slab of about 12 cm in width and 3 cm in height. I use both wrapping methods, depending on where I need to stow away my pens. In both cases you use the rope and hook to close up the pen-roll. This traditional Kimono pen-roll radiates both beauty and quality. The traditional Mosaic pattern with its dark-silver and gold square design looks stunningly beautiful, and the weaving is top-notch. You just feel that you’re holding a high-quality object. I also appreciate the minimalistic branding - just a simple leather tag saying “TACCIA - Japan”. The decorative patterns extends to the inside of the pen-roll, which is a really nice touch that amplifies the aesthetics. A beautiful and well-executed design! My fountain pens are precious to me, and with this TACCIA pen-roll they have a beautiful-looking and well-protected home while I’m carrying them with me. These pen-rolls are not cheap (about 100 EUR for the 8-pen version), but in my opinion still great value for money - both beautiful and functional. I love mine, and am glad I bought it.
  7. jandrese

    Taccia Miyabi Imperial Koi LE

    Here in full focus stacked macro glory is the limited edition Taccia Miyabi Imperial Koi. The background is, I think, byakudan-nuri whereas the fish are in rankaku with mother of pearl raden eyes. Usually, koi are not usually represented this large but Taccia made the specific choice to render them this way to good effect. Sailor nib so it writes well. focus stacked logo by Ja Ja, on Flickr focus stacked koi closeup logo by Ja Ja, on Flickr cap logo by Ja Ja, on Flickr
  8. I haven't done any ink reviews in a long time, but I also haven't acquired any inks in a long time. I wasn't really looking for any inks but was looking through the Taccia inks and noticed some new ones. Since Taccia was bought by Nakabayashi, it seems like the Taccia brand is being used to offer interesting special inks. There is a new series based on the Ukiyo-e printing of 17th century Japan. https://www.nakabayashi.co.jp/_files/EnProduct/0/82/pdf/TFPI-WD42-e.pdf The packaging is very nice as in the pics above and my own: Tested with two pens, a Sailor 1911 Std (M) and an Edison Premiere (M) on Mohawk via Linen and Tomoe River. The Edison pen is wetter and wider than the Sailor pen, and so a bit of of shading is lost. In the Sailor pen the shading is great. No sheen in the usual sense, but on the Tomoe River from the Sailor pen the ink appears as a silvery sheen when seen at just the proper angle. I'm very particular with red inks. Regular reds I don't like, I don't have any use for them. I was concerned whether this ink would be a standard red-leaning brown like MB Toffee Brown or Visconti Brown. I definitely wouldn't want just another ink like that. It is a red ink, but very muted, earthy. I like it a lot. A red that works like a brown. I didn't test water resistance as that's not a quality important to me. I presume it's not very water resistant. A reasonable price for a stealth Sailor ink. The Sailor 1911 Std on MvL; The Edison Premiere on MvL: Tomoe River:
  9. Taccia Uguisi Review of a sample of Taccia Uguisi received from Vanness Pens. Taccia inks are "born in California", but manufactured in Japan. Vanness calls the color "olive green". I am not sure that I would label the color that way. It is a balanced green with a strong blue component (see chromotography below). The ink is not strongly saturated but dark enough in fine nibs to be quite readable and much darker than Pilot Iroshizuku Chiku-rin. The ink flows very nicely from the nib, and is lubricated in much the same way as Sailor inks. There is a very nice reddish-copper colored sheen to the ink on Tomoe River paper, which also shows up on the ink swab as well. The ink also shades moderately well especially in medium and wider nibs. The ink dries fairly quickly and is not water resistant. It does not bleed through or show through except on very cheap paper. Pros: Excellent flow Moderately lubricating Minimal bleedthrough, showthrough, feathering Fast Drying Moderately saturated. Moderate shading. Some sheen. Cons: Not water resistant Price: In the US: $12 for 40 ml at Vanness Pens, Anderson Pens, PenChalet Overall: An Excellent ink in terms of quality and price!
  10. namrehsnoom

    TACCIA Ukiyo-e Hiroshige ainezu

    ink review : TACCIA Ukiyo-e - Hiroshige - ainezu TACCIA is a Japanese stationery company, that - as far as I know - is now part of the Nakabayashi group. They offer high-quality fountain pens, inks, pen-rolls, notebooks, etc. More specifically, TACCIA produce a line of inks, inspired by the unique look of Ukiyo-e paintings from Japan’s Edo period (17th century). Ukiyo-e prints are woodblock prints where the work of an artist is carved into wood by woodworkers, and pressed onto paper by printers. This allows the production of multiple prints of an artwork with some different colours as well. In this review, I take a closer look at ainezu, a dark and stormy grey that is inspired by the painting “Sudden Shower at Shin-Ohashi Bridge” of the artist Utagawa Hiroshige. It was published in 1857 as part of the series One Hundred Famous Views of Edo and is one his best known prints. Sudden showers are a recurring theme in ukiyo-e works and here, in what Hiroshige calls "white rain", the downpour is depicted using a large number of thin dark parallel lines in 2 directions - a difficult skill in woodblock carving. The dark clouds are produced using a gradated bokashi technique and vary significantly between prints. The rain, sheltering people and log raft at the centre of the image give the image a sense of movement. Ainezu is a dark grey with strong teal undertones, that are mostly visible in swabs or when using the ink for drawing. It’s a beautiful complex grey that lays down a wet & dark line that quickly dries to a lighter but still contrast-rich tint. A very strong shader, this one, even in fine nibs. And on top of that, it shows a fair amount of water resistance. All factors combined, this makes it an excellent choice for use at work: the dark grey colour will fit right in, and the strong shading and dark teal undertones will certainly draw the attention of your co-workers. I like this ink a lot: a great grey for writing, and one that really opens up when using it for drawing. The ink comes in a 40 ml bottle, that is packaged in a beautiful box showing the corresponding Ukiyo-e painting. Lovely packaging for an excellent ink. To show you the impact of saturation on the ink’s look & feel on paper, I made some scribbles where I really saturated portions of a strip of 52 gsm Tomoe River paper with ink. This gives you a good idea of what the ink is capable of in terms of colour range. Ainezu has a fairly wide dynamic range, ranging from a pale indigo-tinged grey to a much more saturated dark teal-grey. The contrast between the light and dark parts is not harsh though, which translates to beautiful shading – very present but not too loud. The shading appears in all nib sizes - just a hint with the EF nib, but really present with F-nibs and above. The aesthetics are superb, adding lots of character to your writing. The ink’s chromatography clearly shows the lovely complexity of this grey: grey, indigo, some sky-blue, and – to my eye – a shimmer of green. The bottom part of the chroma also indicates that this is a fairly water-resistant ink, which is confirmed during water tests. TACCIA’s ink makers Hiroshi Ishiguro and Hanse Matsumoto know their craft, and created with this ainezu a wonderfully complex grey that just looks amazing. I’ve tested the ink on a wide variety of paper – from crappy Moleskine to high-end Tomoe River. On every small band of paper I show you: An ink swab, made with a cotton Q-tip 1-2-3 pass swab, to show increasing saturation An ink scribble made with an M-nib Lamy Safari The name of the paper used, written with a B-nib Lamy Safari A small text sample, written with the M-nib Safari Source of the quote, written with a Pelikan M101N with M-nib Drying times of the ink on the paper (with the M-nib Safari) Ainezu looks good on all types of paper – both white and more creamy ones. It lays down a wet and dark line that quickly dries to a lighter tint (5-10 second range). No feathering that I can see. And it can even handle crappy paper (like Moleskine) with ease – good-looking writing, and only limited show-through and bleed-through. A good ink for the workplace! I’ve also added a few photos to give you another view on the ink. Scanned images and photos often capture different aspects of the ink’s colour & contrast. That’s why I present them both. In this case, the photos capture the ink best. The scans seem to exaggerate the teal undertones in the swabs. Writing with different nib sizes The picture below shows the effect of nib sizes on the writing. The EF-nib already shows a hint of shading. But it is with the F-nib and above that the ink’s elegant shading really comes into play. Look e.g. at the shading with the Safari M and B nib – that’s why I use a fountain pen! I personally prefer to use this ink with the drier pens where the shading is more prominent. With wetter pens (like the Pelikan M101N Lizard), the ink gets a bit too saturated and starts to drown out the shading. Related inks To compare ainezu with related inks, I use my nine-grid format with the currently reviewed ink at the center. This format shows the name of related inks, a saturation sample, a 1-2-3 swab and a water resistance test – all in a very compact format. I have lots of greys in my collection, but this TACCIA colour still looks different from all the other ones. Diamine Earl Grey has that same complexity, but is a much cooler shade (cool as in cold, but it's really cool too ;-). Inkxperiment – Ungawa, Timba With every review, I try to create an inkxperiment using only the ink I am reviewing. These one-ink drawings are great for showing the colour-range nuances that can be achieved with a single ink. And it’s great fun to experiment with inks in a more artsy context – I love doing these inkxperiments. They are one of the many things I enjoy about the hobby. During the holiday season, I re-viewed some of the really old Johnny Weismüller movies – grainy black&white cinema, but fun stories and totally uncomplicated. I really enjoyed one of the scenes where Tarzan and his elephants come to the rescue. That’s where the inspiration for this elephant drawing comes from. The picture itself is an adaptation of one I saw on Pinterest. HP photo paper usually brings out the best in inks, so I decided to use it for this drawing. In this case, it really enhances the dark teal undertones in the ink. I started by wetting the photo paper, and drawing some circles on it with pure ainezu, using a glass jar as a stamp. Next I used several passes with a paintbrush and pure ink to darken up the center of the page. After the background had dried completely, I used a glass dip pen and bleach to draw in Tarzan on his elephant. Bleach reacts nicely with ainezu, producing a golden-white colour. The picture gives you an idea of what can be achieved when using ainezu for drawing. Conclusion TACCIA Ukiyo-e Hiroshige ainezu is a near perfect writing ink – good technical properties on all paper types, fairly water-resistent, good contrast with the page and some very nice shading. Colourwise it is an intriguing dark & stormy grey with definite teal undertones. A beautiful ink that totally fits my tastes. Highly recommended! Technical test results on Rhodia N° 16 notepad paper, written with Lamy Safari, M-nib Back-side of writing samples on different paper types
  11. Here are two limited edition Taccia pens from the Hyakko-Hisho lineup. The Hyakko-Hisho is a compendium of craft techniques from the Edo period including lacquer styles. Taccia has been pulling from that for the past two or three years. Pictured first is the Hakumei or twilight from last year, which is primarily green. Second, is this year's Hakumei or starlight/star shine, which is primarily blue. Both make nice use of blended urushi colors and raden. I thought they made a nice pair. Untitled-1 with logo by Ja Ja, on Flickr Untitled-1 yes logo by Ja Ja, on Flickr together with logo by Ja Ja, on Flickr caps together with logo by Ja Ja, on Flickr tails together with logo by Ja Ja, on Flickr
  12. The Taccia Hyakko-Hisho II collection Sango. The Hyakko-Hisho is a collection of 100 urushi styles, a type of reference work that artists have drawn on since the Edo period. Sango means coral and this pen in kawari-nuri captures the essence of coral. A unique addition to the collection. Fitted with a Sailor Zoom nib. AC7FC6BB-687B-4FAA-A81B-A3EAC71B0CB4 by Ja Ja, on Flickr 233884EA-F18B-4476-B23D-236FA60821C8 by Ja Ja, on Flickr
  13. Someone requested a review of this ink since they saw that I had the Red Soil. This inspired me to get on with it, as I was very curious to see what kind of green it was. Rust green, what could that be? This is a very interesting green. Some subtle shading, enhanced by the sheen. The latter is sometimes dark, contributing to the shading, making it quite dramatic. The sheen is definitely red, but often quite dark. The camera picks up the reflection, making it look pink. But it varies depending on light, ink concentration on the paper, and the paper itself. Sometimes the sheen appeared very metallic, making the writing look like graphite pencil. The green is a somewhat neutral bluish-green. It is not bright, but it is well colored. I was a bit worried that it would be a green that I disliked, but that is not the case at all. It's a very pleasant green. It is not a murky swamp green that many people, myself included, really like. This definitely leans very blue as you can see in the backlit photo. When I first looked at the ink, in the evening, I thought maybe a mistake had been made and I was sent the wrong ink. The writing at night looking like a graphite blue if there would be such a thing. It's quite blue when wet, then turning to the green when dry. To me this is a very unique green. Maybe it isn't and I'll learn something. But a reasonable price for a Sailor ink these days. It is $0.50/ml ($20 for 40 ml bottle). The Kobe inks are $30 for 50 ml ($0.60/ml), the Sailor Ink Studio are $18 for 20 ml ($0.90/ml), the new Sailor Four Seasons and Shikiori inks are $15 for 20 ml ($0.75/ml). On Mohawk via Linen, a high quality, somewhat absorbent paper: On Tomoe River paper: Shiny sheen: Nice box! Back Nice bottle! Is this a blue ink? Not really.
  14. Sakura FP Gallery

    Taccia Hyakko Hisho II fountain pens

    Taccia Hyakko-Hisho II fountain pens are made of ebonite with a hexagonal or round body and decorated in a Kawari-Nuri lacquer layer. Kawari-Nuri includes experimental urushi lacquer techniques in which different additives, materials, and methods are brought together. The results are surprising with playful motifs in which chance plays an important role. The Taccia Hyakko-Hisho II fountain pens are limited to 50 pieces per design. Five new designs are added to the five previous ones! https://www.sakurafountainpengallery.com/en/boutique/taccia-japanse-pennen We ship worldwide and most of the time transport is at our expense! The pen fills with Sailor ink cartridges or converter. The 14kt duo-tone nib is available in different sizes. Each Hyakko-Hisho pen comes in a nice Paulownia wooden box with pen kimono, two cartridges, convertor, and cleaning cloth. Note: The designs of these pens are different from the Taccia US designs. Catherine
  15. I hope this review will be interesting to some of you since I have not found many reviews of the urushi pens made by Taccia. As soon as I ordered the pen I resolved that I would post a review - good, bad, or indifferent - since this is a less-known brand and it is hard to be confident in advance what the pens will be like. As it turned out, the pen surpassed my highest hopes and I am thoroughly delighted that I purchased it. Background: Taccia is a small fountain pen and ink manufacturer, established in California in 2003. The company was sold in 2016 to Nakabayashi, a Japanese stationery manufacturer, and now offers its pens with nibs produced by Sailor. The pen I bought was the Hyakko-Hisho Kohaku model, and it cost €850. Like many of the Taccia urushi pens it is a numbered, limited edition of 50. There are four other pens in the “Hyakko-Hisho” series with different style urushi finishes. As far as I can determine, the Hyakko-Hisho was a 17th/18th century compendium of Japanese traditional crafts. Kohaku is the Japanese word for amber, which relates to the urushi colour on this model of the series. I am not knowledgeable about urushi but I understand this pen is lacquered using the Wajima urushi style, which incorporates particles of earth or other materials in the lacquer. Perhaps some of you who possess more knowledge of urushi can expand further on this. The pen comes in a pauwlonia wood box along with a black pen kimono with purple lining. The key question for me, as I considered buying this expensive pen from a less-known brand, was: what makes the pen stand out compared to the many good pens from more established brands at comparable prices? To answer this I think I must start with my reasons for ordering the pen so you will understand what I was looking for and whether it met my expectations. Sailors are my favourite nibs because of their precision, feel and consistency, however I find the Sailor pen body designs and materials disappointing. What I wanted was a high-quality pen with attractive materials and a Sailor nib. I haven’t tried a King of Pen urushi but they are in a rather rarefied price bracket and I am less interested in the more affordable plastic or bare ebonite KoP models. I considered the Cross Peerless 125, which has a Sailor nib, and tried one in a local store, but I absolutely could not get along with the convex section shape and it was very uncomfortable for me. My hope was that this Taccia would offer me the high quality feel I was looking for in a pen with a Sailor-made nib. Design and construction: This is a large pen - at least in length - as you can see from the comparison pictures with a Montblanc 149 and a Pelikan M800. The section is much slimmer than either of those pens, and the nib is quite small (a 14k gold hard-medium Sailor with two-tone Taccia design). For me this is perfect. I prefer small nibs and relatively slim sections, even though I have large hands, because of the feeling of precise control that they give me in writing (not that my writing is particularly precise or controlled!). To my eye the nib size looks appropriate because of the slender section, even though the pen body is large. The section has a significant taper and is quite long, flaring out at the nib end. It is the most comfortable section that I have on any of my pens, and the pen almost disappears from my attention when I write. The nib has a plastic feed, I believe, and it writes beautifully - flawless and reliable ink-flow, a consistent line, pleasant feedback, and long, slender tines for precise location of contact to the paper. The urushi lacquer is yellow stripes over black. If you look carefully you will notice that the yellow lacquer incorporates gold metal particles toward the top of the cap and the bottom of the barrel. The finish has some texture and relief, which I find very pleasing. The quality of lacquer work is very high, as far as I can tell, with no flaws. It is even more beautiful and complex than was apparent from the pictures when I ordered it. The pen is made of ebonite and the body is faceted with twelve sides. The cap comes slightly short of lining-up with the body perfectly when fully closed, but this is hardly noticeable on a pen with so many facets. It there were fewer facets or the edge colour had more contrast then it might have bothered me a little. You can see if you look closely at the pictures, and judge for yourself. I like the clip/roll-stopper design in the flesh better than I thought I would. It functions well, with the right amount of flexibility and firmness. It fits to the cap discreetly with only a small aperture and no significant gaps. Perhaps the design is plain but it you think of it as a roll-stopper this design makes complete sense. The pen is a cartridge/converter filler - standard fare for this kind of urushi pen - and uses a regular Sailor converter. I guess Sailor converters are not known for high ink capacity, but it is no problem for me. The pen is 30g in weight, which is noticeably heavier than you may expect from an ebonite and lacquer pen. It feels well-balanced when writing. The ebonite is thicker than on my Nakaya pens and it lends the pen a greater feeling of solidity. The pen is still light enough to cause no fatigue when writing, but it just has such a feel of quality which I believe is due to the thicker ebonite together with the texture and excellence of the lacquer work. You can see that the threads for the cap are well away from where the pen is gripped, and they are un-lacquered ebonite. Leaving the threads un-lacquered is a design choice I thought might detract from the appearance, judging from photos of the pen, but with the pen in-hand I think it works well and it is not jarring at all. I am still unsure about bare ebonite, as this will inevitably discolour over time, but I guess urushi pens are partly about the experience of seeing the pen finish change over time. Coupled with the yellow lacquer I guess it will not look bad. Wabi-sabi. Overall: I was extremely pleased with this pen and I think it is good value relative to other pens with this kind of complex urushi finish. It truly feels high quality throughout. The positive surprises for me were the greater feeling of solidity and gravitas compared to my Nakayas; the beauty, high quality, and pleasing texture of the lacquer work; and the exceptional comfort and control I experience with the long, slender section. For me there were no real downsides and this is absolutely among my most pleasurable pens to own and write with. I love my Nakayas (I have three portable cigars) but overall I feel this Taccia surpasses them in quality and comfort, offers better value, and of course it also has the Sailor nib that I prize. I expect I will buy more Taccia urushi pens in future, following this positive experience. At least as long as they continue to be fitted with Sailor nibs, which is what brought me to this pen in the first place. If, however, you dislike small nibs and slender sections then perhaps this is not the pen for you. Some other Taccia urushi pen models have a larger sized 18k nib, also made for Taccia by Sailor.
  16. Introduction and Elephant in the room First paragraph same as Taccia cha so ignore if aware (info on bottle if interested). First let me take a moment to address the elephant in the room, box and bottle. Bottle has big mouth for any pens is no issues with filling, but then when ink is low might not be easy to get last drops of ink...I can’t be sure cos I cannot see any mechanism to help here..still a nice bottle overall. Box is not paper like most inks (not 100% at least) it sure does not feel like one, more durable and stronger with inside fins designed to keep ink from moving around and requires some effort to open as the top acts like a lock (its not hard just not too easy either basically the box does what box should do protect the ink)...not bad considering my waterman came out of box during shipping. Gotta love the warning labels, only for writing purpose...makes me want to draw always, and this one is quite good for that. Ink Review Section test papers 100 GSM JK cedar 75 GSM Spectra copy paper 52 and 57 GSM classmate registers. (52 GSM showed dot bleed) 70 and 80GSM Nightingale papers Cheap random registers and papers. GSM is well suspense at best, most likely 40 ish. Nature of ink the colors are off here and they are lighter in real life, my pea shooter camera is unable to pick it, close up shots will be added for actual color reference. A close up with better look at color, golden here is quite visible and is quite accurate. Dry Time- 8 to 25 sec on some papers, not 20 sec had to clear this one. Saturation- good Bleed- very slight on cheap papers and dot bleeds on 52 GSM classmate A decent bleed when closed in, done on 52 GSM classmate paper. Its not as bad as pic might make it seem, entire 'S' and 'C' for reference is ghosting and bleed is only considerable on 'T' and 'H' corners where first line of 'H' is again ghosting. This is also area where shade is high, more on this later. Feathering- very slight wool-ish on papers with high absorbent nature, present on shade area. Smudges-none at least by finger. Lubrication-great Ghosting (show-through)- none on most papers apart from cheap guys....and where it bled... Flow- good. Wet/Dry- Its balanced ink but very close to wet nature so much so that it might feel wet to some, mostly due to shading points where ink is present on page more then usual. Shading- quite high. this pic also has better color visible for the ink. Shading is quite high here and its these parts that show any sign of bleed on real cheap papers. Water resistance- none.. Cleaning- Easy clean with water. Personal take on ink I decided to separate this part as it varies from people to people and might not be interesting for some who just need quick info on ink, I intend to do same for any review I write, whenever I write. Anyway lets go. The ink does show a very nice dark golden brown color to it and the addition of shading was very welcome for me. The test pen Lamy Safari sees no issue of flow or hard starts and I don’t think there will be any either seeing how ink behaves. The picture of wheat fields might be little too much as from what I remember wheat fields are more golden in sunlight, but depends on light really so they are sorta right....they do miss mark there. Funny part aside, ink is really great and shows great golden color with lots of shading of dark brown color which is almost black making entire write up look different in good ways. The color I feel will be liked by most, its lighter then in pics abid by very small margin. No water resistance is a bummer but again taccia themselves say there is none so no big deal for me. The bleed which I see is mostly on places where there is more ink deposit for shading that ink gives, this also means that a quick writing with no pen lift will give only golden color with no shades, not happens in real world so shade will be seen and even when speed is fallen the shades tends to give in, as seen in small write up below. Speed writing reduces the shade to some extent but do not eliminate them, all in all shade is high as seen on Fine nibs and will be visible on most cases. I tried to write in continuous flow without lifting pen, made multi strokes on same line and slow speed due to not in habit of doing so made result look more or less same as normal😅 the upper paragraph show quite accurate color of ink when written on fast pace as done above. Conclusion I have not tried it yet but using flex nibs should give some beautiful results (my flex is currently filled with waterman serenity blue ink). All in all its very nice ink and I like it both for behaviour and color. Go ahead give it a go, you will like it for sure and costs of Rs 940 or 12-ish dollars plus shipping for 40ml.
  17. Dimy

    Taccia Cha Review

    Taccia Cha ink review Disclaimer- First ink review here and would appreciate pointers if I missed something or if there is any information that one needs to know specifically not mentioned here also I lack other browns to compare color big apologies I don't have too many inks. First let me take a moment to address the elephant in the room, box and bottle. Bottle has big mouth for any pens is no issues with filling, but then when ink is low...I don’t know cos I cant see any mechanism to help here..its just a nice bottle. Box is not paper like most inks (not 100% at least) it sure does not feel like one, more durable and stronger with inside fins designed to keep ink from moving around and requires some effort to open as the top acts like a lock (its not hard just not too easy either basically the box does what box should do protect the ink)...not bad considering my waterman came out of box during shipping. I love how they say not to use it for anything other then writing.....makes me want to draw something Taccia Cha is a brown ink with slight hint of redness in it . Its quite nice ink and behaves very nicely on any and all papers that I tried it on. Shading potential though looks a bit questionable in all my test papers but who knows maybe Tomoe river will show some results, but that will have to wait till Christmas not too hopeful here (fingers crossed). Performance is good on absorbent papers and copy papers with all properties being same. Fun fact they draw a tea on cover and its quite accurate one just needs to add ton of tea leaves and burn the tea itself to get this deep brown with reddish hint as per say burnt tea...and I like this..the color not burnt tea . Saturation- good Bleed- none Feathering- none Smudges-none Lubrication-great Ghosting (show-through)- none on most papers apart from cheap guys. Flow- good. Wet/Dry- Its in between wet and dry but tilts slightly to wetter side..nice balance if one asks me. Dry time (approx) - 9-10 sec on 75 GSM copy paper, 11-12 sec on JK cedar 100 GSM paper, 8-9 sec on classmate register (no idea of GSM..I think its 52 from what I remember). I have tried to get as accurate color as I could with pee shooter of phone camera, they are pretty near just color is darker in real by a margin. Water resistance test method was putting drops of water for 30 sec in first sample and 1 min in second sample then wiping with cloth to try to remove the ink. Water resistance is very low (none to be honest). Second test I did not bother as ink wont survive that one (that involves putting ink paper under tap with mug below and letting the ink get dipped in it followed by wiping the paper with cloth to recreate floods or rain case). All in all a very good ink and if you like the color then go for it its great to work with. No water resistance is a bummer but hey Taccia themselves make it clear these are not so no big deal.
  18. Taccia overview: Taccia is a Taiwanese-American brand started in California, that has been recently been bought by the Nakabayashi company. Nakabayashi is a maker of a long list of home and office products who have, under the Taccia brand, begun making fountain pen inks. All Taccia inks are made in Japan. There is some speculation as to whether Sailor makes the Taccia inks, but I have found no evidence to prove this. What I can say, according the the information I was able to gather is that at the time when Nakabayashi bought Taccia and wanted to release inks under that brand, they entered into an agreement with Sailor for the purposes of expert ink consultation. A couple of the Taccia standard line bear a striking resemblance to Sailor Jentle/Shikiori inks. Outside and within the standard line, they have a few unique inks. Also, Taccia inks I have tried do not have that "Sailor-made smell" you are all so familiar with. The Ukiyo-e Ink Series was released overseas in 2019. In March 2020, a second series of 8 inks was released. These are for Utamara Hiroshige and Kitagawa Utamaro. I saw the release post on the Nagasawa Instagram page and emailed them directly for order. As of this publication, other Japanese bungu retailers have received stocks. They were Y1,600 or USD15 for each 40ml bottle of ink. The below translated names in Japanese and English are credited unchanged to Nagasawa Kobe Stationary store. Second Series Taccia Ukiyo-e Includes: 歌川広重(Hiroshige Utagawa) 1.広重浅縹(Hiroshige asahanada) 2.広重瑠璃(Hiroshige Ruri) 3.広重中紫(Hiroshige Nakamurasaki) 4.広重藍鼠(Hiroshige Ainezu) 喜多川歌麿(Utamaro Kitagawa) 5.歌麿紅桜(Utamaro Beni Zakura) 6.歌麿青紫(Utamaro Aomurasaki) 7.歌麿薄墨(Utamaro Usuzumi) 8.歌麿梅紫(Utamaro Umemurasaki) I’ve only opened one of the inks so far, and that is Taccia Hiroshige Ainezu. Now let’s get into the review. Online images are unhelpful. Taccia's own marketing materials do not give a fair representation of any of the inks I've tried. I would have sworn, from seeing their images and sample writing, that Ainezu was going to be a blue-black ink. I was way off. Ink bottle opening will fit large nibs comfortably, they are 40ml glass bottles with metal caps. The packaging is lovely, and far larger than the bottle needs in space to fit, which is nice, as this means the box artwork is easier to admire. Packaging & Bottle Each bottle comes packaged with a sturdy card. I've included both series below. The good stuff. Tomoe River Paper 52gsm White This is a gray ink, through and through. What I am able to cypher from the Kanji is that Ainezu means indigo-tinged gray. The kanji: 藍鼠 藍 ai / indigo 鼠 nezu / dark gray Ink Characteristics 1. Well-behaved 2. No feathering 3. No bleed-through 4. Acceptably wet 5. Smooth flowing, not gushing 6. Good shading in right pen [light to dark gray] 7. Easy cleaning with a few flushes 8. No staining discovered 9. Unexpected water resistance Other Ink properties you might find interesting is the ink goes on as a super-dark gray, almost black. It lightens as it dries which makes writing easy on the eyes. This is the opposite effect of Montblanc Spider Web Grey, which goes on nearly invisible when wet and dries darker. I prefer the former over the latter. As for the sheen, it is seen in the borders between light and dark, and is red and coppery. It does not overwhelm. The ink also looks quite light or dark depending on the paper and pen used. The shading also varies greatly under these conditions. Rhodia Dotpad Life Bank Paper Mead notebook paper / college ruled There is barely any feathering, which is quite good considering the wetness of the pen (and the terrible quality of the paper). It only shows up on close inspection. Even in this image it is difficult to spot. Water drop test Rhodia Water drown and dab test Rhodia Rubbed in and swirled. Pretty good. Both water tests left for 2+ minutes. Ink also dry for 2 minutes. Dry times Pretty average. Comparison Tomoe River Paper 52gsm Cream That's it! I do believe that we should receive this second set at some point, as we have had everything except for the special editions and the jeans ink available outside of Japan. Finally, of the newer ink manufacturers, Taccia is definitely a personal favorite. And I've been on a gray ink kick, so this was a welcome surprise. To be honest, I would't have really minded if it was another blue-black. I like those too. And that's the end of my first review. Hope you enjoyed this. I may do the remainder once I’ve tried them and if this was helpful to anyone. Happy inking and thank you for your time.
  19. The Paper Plane - TACCIA Ukiyo-e Prime A5 notebook I've been enjoying this little corner of the web for some time now, mainly focusing on inks and pens. But these are more or less useless without the humble paper or notebook that will let you capture your thoughts. So here comes the "Paper Plane", where I review some of the paper and notebooks that I've enjoyed using over the years. Today's guest is the TACCIA Ukiyo-e Prime A5 notebook, a small and elegant notebook with some very fine paper. This TACCIA notebook is a rebranded form of the Nakabayashi Prime A5 notebook. In fact, all of the TACCIA Ukiyo-e inks & corresponding paper happen to be rebranded Nakabayashi products. The latter company was founded in 1923 with a focus on library book binding and restoration of old documents. Later, Nakabayashi added stationery products like address books, notebooks and office products to their portfolio. For each of the 16 TACCIA Ukiyo-e inks, there is a corresponding A5 notebook, featuring the same Ukiyo-e painting on its cover. For this review, I describe the Sharaku Prime A5 notebook, which has a picture of the actor Otani Oniji III as Yakko Edobe on its cover. Yakko Edobe is a villainous rogue who plots to steal money from the servant Ippei. Otani Oniji's leering face, shown in three quarter view, bristling hair, and groping outstretched hands capture the ruthless nature of this wicked henchman. Aside from the difference in covers, all notebooks of the Ukiyo-e series have the same technical characteristics. The notebook itself is only one part of a stationery set, which also includes the corresponding ink, letter envelopes and paper, greeting cards, ... But let us focus on the notebook, which is the centerpiece of this review. I got mine as a gift from Sakura Fountain Pen Gallery and was told that it was worth checking out - thank you Catherine. This is an A5 size notebook (148x210 mm), containing 48 pages of ruled paper. These are minimalistic, but perfectly constructed notebooks; the beautiful covers form the only ornamentation. Inside there are no distractions - only light-grey ruled lines on the paper (with an 8 mm spacing). The first and last rule on each page are a tiny bit darker, framing the page and adding to its elegance. The notebook lays very flat when opened. This is due to the way it is stitched together. Each notebook consists of a number of 6 page bundles, with every bundle (or signature as it is called in bookbinding parlance) built from 3 A4 pages, that are folded over and stitched together to form a small booklet of 6 A5 pages. Stitch together 8 of these signatures, and you get a very flat-laying 48 page notebook. This A5 notebook uses 75 gsm Nakabayashi paper that is very fountain pen friendly. The paper is smooth but still has a tiny bit of tooth to it. This makes it a joy to write on. It has an off-white colour, but it's still close to white, certainly not yellowish. Inks look fantastic on this paper, and even with wet pens and broad nibs there is zero feathering. Looking at the backside, there is almost no see-through, and zero bleed-through - even when doing ink swabs on the paper. You can easily use both sides of the page in this notebook. This is really top-notch paper! Excellent! Conclusion If you like small and elegant notebooks, the TACCIA Ukiyo-e series of A5 notebooks is worthy of your attention. Great fountain pen friendly paper that is pure pleasure to write on. I can see myself using these little notebooks for theme-specific purposes - e.g. as an ink journal, reading journal, ... Beautiful pieces of stationery! I'm glad I discovered them.
  20. Lovely ink that I did not expect to like. Good flow, dries fast, and just plain works even on less than stellar paper. Taccia Koiame by Ja Ja, on Flickr Taccia Koiame chroma by Ja Ja, on Flickr Taccia & Nakabayashi boxes koiame by Ja Ja, on Flickr
  21. Recently, I acquired several samples of Taccia Ink. Taccia Ink is newly developed in California, but made in Japan by experienced ink makers. There are 13 colors that are vibrant and pleasurable. The inspiration for the colors comes from the "Japanese way of seeing colors in a pure, honest and innocent way". The bottles are similar to Sailor bottles, but I do not know if they have the pen filler insert since I have not purchased a bottle yet. (Photo compliments of Vanness Pens) This is a lovely ink that is a well saturated red that goes from a medium violet red to an intense dark cherry. The ink is nicely lubricated with hints of green sheen in areas where the ink pools. This ink is well behaved in this moderately wet nib, and reminds me of many Sailor inks - not just the bottle but the ink itself. Fast drying, limited bleedthrough, showthrough and feathering, and with some shading, Taccia Ebi is an excellent alternative to other well known inks in this color range. Taccia Ebi ink / Conklin Duragraph with 1.1 nib / Staples Arc paper Note: The ink name is Ebi, not Ebo; and the ink comes in 40 ml bottles Taccia Ebi ink / Conklin Duragraph with 1.1 nib / Tomoe River 68 gsm Note: The ink name is Ebi, not Ebo; and the ink comes in 40 ml bottles Pros: Fast drying Minimal bleedthrough, showthrough, feathering Excellent flow Moderate lubrication Above average shading Cons: Average dark red color Minimal sheening Price: In the US: $12 for 40 ml at Vanness Pens, Anderson Pens, PenChalet Overall, an great value both in terms of price and quality!
  22. This is the third review of the four Hokusai Katsushika inks from Taccia/Nakabayashi that have reached American shores. I didn't know what to expect with this ink. Would "Light Blue" mean a lighter, brighter color, more like a turquoise? Would it simply mean "not dark"? The truth of the matter is closer to the latter than the former. In a dry pen this will be more of a pastel, light blue. Very readable, with excellent shading. In a wetter pen the shading is still there, in a greater range of values (light-dark), and a bit more saturation. But I'll admit that I wasn't delighted by this ink like I was with the other three inks in the series. It could have been the pen didn't work well with this ink even though it wrote perfectly fine. But it is an ink that I had to nudge the converter down to remove air from the converter. It seemed I had to do that more with this ink in this pen than others, so it could very well be the two just didn't get along as well as one would like. Neither one's fault really, just not very compatible. The ink really has no showthrough or bleedthrough issues on the absorbent (but good quality) Mohawk via Linen paper. Inks never sheen on this paper (well the Rust Green did). Dries pretty fast comparatively. The blue leans towards green, but I don't think enough to be called teal. Closer to Cerulean I think. You can really go over how the ink looks in this image. The first part of the text is with a normal feed. Towards the end you can see where I nudged it pushed more ink into the feed and the line got noticeably darker. I don't know if these are limited edition. But this is the only ink of the Hokusai series currently in stock at Anderson Pens.
  23. This is a brief post to share a really pretty urushi pen from Taccia. Done in yakumo nuri or thick cloud lacquer the blue base and golden clouds really sings. This is an attractive and very photogenic pen. As is the case with all these Taccia Reserve LE based pens it is also a great writer with their Sailor nibs. The music stub feeds from a CC and writes a wide, well controlled somewhat wet line. The cap has a slip n seal mechanism so can leave unattended for some time and will still write right away. While not slated for production there are some other colors still available at Chatterly. IMG_2725 by Ja Ja, on Flickr IMG_2726 by Ja Ja, on Flickr IMG_2727 by Ja Ja, on Flickr IMG_2728 by Ja Ja, on Flickr IMG_2729 by Ja Ja, on Flickr IMG_2733 by Ja Ja, on Flickr IMG_2736 by Ja Ja, on Flickr
  24. DrDebG

    Inklings - Taccia A O Blue

    Recently, I acquired several samples of Taccia Ink. Taccia Ink is newly developed in California, but made in Japan by experienced ink makers. There are 13 colors that are vibrant and pleasurable. The inspiration for the colors comes from the "Japanese way of seeing colors in a pure, honest and innocent way". The bottles are similar to Sailor bottles, but I do not know if they have the pen filler insert since I have not purchased a bottle yet. (Photo compliments of Vanness Pens) This ink can be summed up in one word: WONDERFUL! I have very rarely used an ink as pleasurable to write with as this one. From the moment I loaded into my Bexley Elegancia with medium nib - a dry nib I might add - this ink has been extraordinary. Even when writing on inexpensive copy paper, this ink is fast drying, did not bleed through, and had little show through. And the sheen on Tomoe River paper is AMAZING! The ink is well saturated and somewhat water resistant, which should appeal for professional use. And the color is consistently a strong medium blue with a strong crimson sheen. IMO this ink would do well in any pen with, maybe, the exception in a very wet, wide nibbed pen. Taccia AO Blue ink/ Bexley Elegancia medium nib pen/ Staples ARC paper Taccia AO Blue Ink/ Bexley Elegancia medium nib/Tomoe River 68 gsm paper Pros: Excellent flow Moderately lubricating Minimal bleedthrough, showthrough, feathering Fast Drying Well saturated SHEEN! SHEEN! SHEEN! Cons: Little to no shading Average blue shade Price: In the US: $12 for 40 ml at Vanness Pens, Anderson Pens, PenChalet Overall: An Excellent ink in terms of quality and price!
  25. I am thinking about getting a Nakaya Decapod or a Taccia Kaku-Tate, but I am not sure how they compare to each other: Does anyone have a picture with both of them, maybe even together with another pen like a Lamy 2000 or Safari? As far as I can tell, the Nakaya Decapod is significantly smaller and a bit slimmer, since it is also slightly tapered towards the ends. But does the Taccia Kaku-Tate really look "bulky" in comparison? Thanks a lot in advance!





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