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  1. yazeh

    Noodler's Tsvetayeva

    A rich red, homage to the great Russian poetess, Marina Tsvetayeva. Note Nathan Tardiff uses an alternative spelling for Tsvetaeva. Information gleaned from her biography is from wikipedia and poetry foundation. Note: The selected poems are from a translation by Andrey Kneller on Kindle. I've chosen certain lines and not entire poems. Marina Tsvetayeva was born in Moscow 8 October 1892. Her father was a professor of fine arts, her mother a concert pianist, who wanted her to become a musician and not a poet, as she found her poems insipid. She spend most of her life out of use. Don’t mistake these soulful eyes for meekness. Tsvetayeva’s poetry, reads like punctuated bullet shots: an explosion of emotions, imagery, and sounds. She once famously said, “Next time I will be born not on a planet, but on a comet!” A prophetic poem on Midori/ Ahab Note how the saturated feed lightens Some of her poetry is especially apt in the current situation of war. To love a country that does not love you, to be a stranger in exile and in exile in your own country. That was the lot of Marina Tsvetayeva. Tomoe River She and her family paid for it dearly. Her life was mired with poverty, exile, and tragedy. Tsvetayeva married an army cadet, Sergei Efron, who fought in the World War I and during the Russian revolution joined the white army, and after their defeat in 1920, emigrated to Paris. Stuck in Moscow during the great famine, she left her daughters in the care of orphanage, believing they would be fed better. One of them died from starvation. She emigrated in 1922 to Paris and reunited with her husband. In Paris, she was shunned, by the Russian intelligentsia, especially after she wrote to a Soviet poet. From then on she lived from hand to mouth. TR 68gr Her daughter, Ariadna, espoused communist ideals and left for the Soviet Union in 1937, followed by her husband, Efron, who unbeknownst to Tsvetayeva had become a NKVD spy and was involved in a couple of assassinations of Russian dissidents. HP 32 Ironically both Efron and Ariadna were imprisoned in charges of espionage in 1941. Efron was murdered, and Ariadna spend 16 years in the gulag. This is on Hammermill Printer Paper, Premium Multipurpose Paper 20 lb, 92 brightness.... Tsvetayeva moved back to the Soviet Union in 1939. From then on, she lived in abject poverty and hanged herself in 1941. She was 48. To finish the train wreck of her life, her beloved son, volunteered and was killed in 1944. Now for the ink: I thought I had found my dream bulletproof red. But for some reason this ink, like other Noodler’s red, has difficult to dry and depending on the pen/paper/nib can smudge. For example, with a Jinhao 450, it lays a lot of ink that smudges on Midori 30 minutes later. Ironically with Ahab it behaved in a much different fashion. But still, I won’t recommend it to lefties, or those who write copiously on Japanese papers with wet pens and wide nibs. Ironically on absorbent paper it dries instantly. This is an unrelated text. It is a photo to show off the shading with a fude nib.... Though dry times is atrocious... Paper is Apica Comparison Cleaning is a bit like other red/ pink inks, a pain. Though I have had worse, Skrip Red/ Sailor Grenade and Herbin rose cyclamen. But you definitely need a pen liquid wash. This is one beautiful red, and if it didn’t have the smudge problem, I would been buying a bottle. I suspect that a drop of water might alleviate the smudge problem much like Red-Black. Note Russian series inks are more expensive than standard bulletproof inks. Ink is bulletproof, fluorescent. Note the left side was held under water. I didn't wait 24 hour for the ink to dry completely. The excess ink washed away. • Pens used: Ahab/ Jinhao 450 fude • Shading: delightful with wider nib. • Ghosting: a bit on absorbent paper… • Bleed through: No. • Flow Rate: medium.. • Lubrication: average • Nib Dry-out: No. • Start-up: No • Saturation: Deep rich red • Shading Potential: Yes • Sheen: None • Spread / Feathering / Woolly Line: Not noticed • Nib Creep / “Crud”: it depends. • Staining (pen): you need to rinse it in a pen wash. But surprisingly it was easier to clean that Rose Cyclamen/ Skrip red. • Clogging: None • Water resistance: Excellent • Availability: 90 ml bottles – More expensive than traditional Noodler’s inks.
  2. A complex grey belonging to the Russian series, an homage to the great Russian Poet, Boris Pasternak. In its early iteration this ink was purple. Check 2012 reviews of @Sandy1and @mhphoto Pasternak was born in an integrated Jewish Russian family. His father was a painter, his mother a pianist. As a four-year-old, Tolstoy visited their house, to listen Pasternak’s mother play the piano. A young Pasternak by his father Leonid 1910, Courtesy of Wikipedia. In his youth he met Alexander Scriabin, the great Russian composer, and decided to become a musician but after six years of toil he realized he had no talent. So, he abandoned music and studied philosophy in Germany, but to no avail. Thankfully he settled on literature: Poetry and translation Here is a sample of his work (translation used from Poemhunter) on TR 68gr and Midori… While like many Russians artists, he embraced the promise of the revolution, he soon became disillusioned. He survived the great purge. It is said that Stalin had written besides his name: leave alone this cloud dweller. Yet his lover was sent to the gulag and had a miscarriage. Some say he survived maybe, because he translated works of Georgian Literature. Stalin was from Georgia/Russia. The culmination of his work was Dr. Zhivago, his only work of prose, for which and his poetry he was awarded the Nobel prize for literature, which brought him disgrace. He died two years later. He died two years after, is dishonour for having accepted/awarded the Nobel prize (though he rejected it, 6 days after). Dr. Zhivago was published in Russia in 1988. I don’t know why Nathan has settled on grey. I am not familiar enough with Pasternak’s work. However, the complexity of the chroma has convinced that the literary imagery of this genius would demand a cacophony of colour to create a vibrant grey. Now for the ink: This is a dream ink for an occasional sketcher, on good fountain pen paper. The ink is wetter than the other Russian inks, I tried and it would embrace copy paper like a long-lost lover, never to let go. I preferred it most in my medium Jinhao. I enjoyed less with EF/F nibs, though truth be said, I’m not a fan of fine lines in general, unless I’m doodling. With TWSBI Stub, was a bit difficult to control. Though enjoyable to write. Here is an unrelated sketch: Note Russian series inks are more expensive than standard bulletproof inks. Ink is bulletproof. However, excess ink will wash away as you can see on the left image. · Pens used: TWSBI Go STUB – Jinaho 450 fude/ medium nib, No name F/EF nibs. · Shading: Quite a bit on good paper. · Ghosting: No · Bleed through: Yes on copy paper · Flow Rate: Wet · Lubrication: Cushiony · Nib Dry-out: No. · Start-up: No · Saturation: Deep rich grey. Though on absorbent paper it turns into a dull grey. · Shading Potential: Yes · Sheen: None · Spread / Feathering / Woolly Line: Not noticed · Nib Creep / “Crud”: No · Staining (pen): Very easy to clean… · Clogging: None · Water resistance: Excellent · Availability: 90 ml bottles
  3. yazeh

    Noodler's Kuprin

    Noodler’s Kuprin Is a rich garnet colour, belonging to the Russian series, an homage to the Russian novelist, Aleksandr Kuprin. The colour, I assume, is a nod to one of his short stories, the Garnet Bracelet, a sentimental story of unrequited love. Chroma Some snippets from the Garnet Bracelet on Midori - Fude nib - Fine nib Kuprin was born in 1870 in the Russian empire and after a stint in the army and many odd jobs, settled on writing short stories, the most famous being the Duel (life of an officer in a dreary garrison in southern Russia), The Pit (vignettes about life in a second tired brothel), and many other short stories. His style is poetic and paints well the end and the obvious demise of the Tzarist Russia. TR 68 gr Apica Medium/ fine nib I found several of his lines describing Jews, a sad reflection of the pogroms. He left before the 1917 revolution to Paris and never achieved his fame again. He returned to Soviet Union, destitute and finished, to great triumph and died a year after, at age 67, in 1938. In contrast to his depressing life, the ink is rich, deep warm burgundy, with delightful. I found the ink non lubricated when I pressed the nib hard but smooth if I wrote with a light touch. Here is a comparison with some other burgundy inks: Ink is definitely waterproof: And here is a whimsical sketch to brighten your day: Note Russian series inks are more expensive than standard bulletproof inks. Ink is bulletproof. • Pens used: Noodler’s Ahab/ Kaweco Perkeo Fine/ Jinhao Medium/fude • Shading: Quite a bit on good paper. • Ghosting: No • Bleed through: Didn’t notice. • Flow Rate: Balanced • Lubrication: Better with soft/ smooth nibs. I would recommend this ink to people who have a soft touch. • Nib Dry-out: Note noticed • Start-up: Not noticed • Saturation: Deep rich burgundy • Shading Potential: Delightful • Sheen: None • Spread / Feathering / Woolly Line: Not noticed • Nib Creep / “Crud”: No • Staining (pen): Very easy to clean… • Clogging: None • Water resistance: Excellent • Availability: 90 ml bottles
  4. Noodler’s Chekhov is Light pastel pink, belonging to the Russian line. One of the most subtle and soft inks I have ever used and one of the best inks, I've ever tried, period. It brings me silent joy. From what I've tried and tested, I really like the Russian Series in General. They are well behaved and easy to clean and water resistant. They have also rekindled my passion for reading poetry. A bit about Anton Chekhov: He was born in 1869 and died at age 44 from tuberculosis. He was a doctor by profession, but is considered one the greatest writers of all times. He once said, "Medicine is my lawful wife, and literature is my mistress." Chekhov was author of four plays, the Sea Gull, Uncle Vanya and 3 Sisters, the Cherry Orchard and many short stories. I assume the ink is a nod to the Cherry Orchard an The ink shades delightfully with broad and flex nibs. It’s a shade that soothes the soul. The ink was slightly less lubricated in my Lamy Safari. It gave just enough feedback to remind me, that I'm writing. Dry time is about 15 seconds. Midori Ahab Lamy Broad/ Reverse The chroma is simple: On Tomoe River - Ahab TR 68gr with Ahab Comparison: Here is a written sample on FIELD NOTES, notebooks. These are non FP friendly notebooks, super absorbent. Front: Back B Note Russian series inks are more expensive than standard bulletproof inks. Ink is bulletproof however, if you drag a wet Q-tip on the ink, it can be removed to a certain extent. However, under running water it looks fine and rubbing alchol doesn't faze it at all. Ink is fluorescent. • Pens used: Noodler’s Ahab/ Lamy Safari Broad • Shading: Quite a bit on good paper with wide nibs. • Ghosting: Not on good paper. Check Field notes. • Bleed through: On absorbent paper with wide nibs. • Flow Rate: Balanced • Lubrication: Good, but it can be slightly dry depending your pen. • Nib Dry-out: No • Start-up: No • Saturation: pastel • Shading Potential: With flex and broad nibs. • Sheen: None • Spread / Feathering / Woolly Line: Not noticed…on FIELD NOTES paper a bit. • Nib Creep / “Crud”: No • Staining (pen): Easy to clean… • Clogging: Nope • Water resistance: Excellent • Availability: 90 ml bottles





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