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  1. Astronymus

    Tinte_Aquarell_20220123

    From the album: Stuff by Astronymus

    Two ink watercolor pictures I painted today.

    © astronymus.net

  2. Rohrer and Klingner Isatis Tinctoria (2021 Limited Edition) Rohrer and Klinger – founded in 1892 in Leipzig, Germany – is a company that is mainly focusing on inks for all purposes, including fountain pen inks. Like every self-respecting company these days, they have started the tradition of releasing a limited edition ink every year. In 2021, they introduced this splendid Isatis Tinctoria, a dusty blue with purple undertones. The ink comes in a 50 ml bottle presented in a stylish box. Isatis Tinctoria is already quasi impossible to find, and has reached “unobtainium” status. Fellow member @JulieParadise was so kind to provide me with a generous sample of this ink, with the request to compare it to kyo-iro Soft Snow of Ohara (resulting in an ink shoot-out). Afterwards, enough of the sample was left for a complete review of this wonderful ink. Thank you Julie for providing this opportunity. This Limited Edition R&K ink is a soft dusty blue with definite purple undertones. A really elegant & beautiful ink that totally fits my tastes. According to Wikipedia, Isatis Tinctoria (also called dyer’s woad) is a flowering plant in the family Brassicaceae. Since ancient times, woad was an important source of blue dye and was cultivated throughout Europe. Rohrer & Klingner definitely succeeded in translating this inspiration into a fantastic ink colour. The chromatography shows a mix of blue, purple and grey. The dusty looks of the ink are clearly present. This combination of dyes translates to a soft and muted grey-blue with purple undertones. Definitely not a vibrant colour! But nevertheless an elegant ink – soft, quiet, shy. Part of my education comes from the 5-year old in the family, so I’m fluent in Frozen… for Isatis Tinctoria, think Anna, not Elsa. Isatis Tinctoria looks best in broader nibs, where it shows some really nice shading. But it can handle the complete nib range with ease – even with the EF nib, you already get hints of shading. To show you the impact of saturation on the ink’s look & feel on paper, I made some scribbles where I really saturated portions of a piece of 52 gsm Tomoe River paper with ink. This gives you a good idea of what the ink is capable of in terms of colour range. Isatis Tinctoria has a fairly narrow colour span, with limited contrast between light and darker parts. This translates to soft shading, that is very present but remains delicate and aesthetically very pleasing. The shading on this ink is really well executed! Technically, the ink felt a bit dry-writing in my Lamy Safari test pens, especially with the finer nibs. Not so much an issue of wetness, but more of lubrication. With the finer nibs, you definitely feel more feedback from the paper while writing. With broader nibs, lubrication improves, and the ink starts writing much more fluently. In the writing samples below, I added a new paper to my test-set: Clairefontaine Smart Print Paper 60 gsm – a very fine fountain pen-friendly paper (Tomoe River-like in weight, but not as smooth but with some feedback while writing). On each scrap of paper I show you: An ink swab, made with a cotton Q-tip 1-2-3 pass swab, to show increasing saturation An ink scribble made with an M-nib Safari fountain pen The name of the paper used, written with B-nib Lamy Safari A small text sample, written with the M-nib Lamy Safari Source of the quote, with an Edison Collier 1.1 stub Drying times of the ink on the paper, with the M-nib Lamy Safari I’ve also added a few photos to give you another view on the ink. Scanned images and photos often capture different aspects of the ink’s colour & contrast. That’s why I present them both. In this case, both scan and photo capture the ink’s colour well. Isatis Tinctoria looks good on all types of paper, both white and more creamy ones. I personally prefer it on pure white paper, where its soft and delicate character is best presented. The ink prefers high-quality paper. On lower quality papers (Moleskine, printing paper) you can see a tiny bit of feathering, and you also get some see-through and bleed-through. Writing with different nib sizes The picture below shows the effect of nib sizes on the writing. Isatis Tinctoria writes a well-saturated line in all nib sizes, notwithstanding its softness. The saturation sample already showed the limited contrast range of the ink. As a result, this R&K ink manages to look really consistent in colour across the complete nib range, both in wet and dry pens. Personally, I like this ink best in the broader nibs, where the soft shading is a bit more prominent. Related inks To show off related inks, I use my nine-grid format, with the currently reviewed ink at the center. This format shows the name of related inks, a saturation sample, a 1-2-3 swab and a water resistance test – all in a very compact format. Isatis Tinctoria has a quite unique colour. It sits somewhere between kyo-no-oto keshimurasaki (which is greyer) and kyo-iro Soft Snow of Ohara (which is more purple). Inkxperiment – neuromancer As a personal challenge, I try to create interesting drawings using only the ink I’m reviewing. I find this to be a fun extension of the hobby, and these single-ink drawings often present a real challenge. It also gives you an idea of what the ink is capable of in a more artistic setting. Inspiration for this inkxperiment comes from the book “Neuromancer” by William Gibson. This book from 1984 is considered one of the earliest and best-known works in the cyberpunk genre. In the book you are presented with a drab and dystopian physical world, with the characters spending most of their time in the matrix of cyberspace. The whole book is written in adrenaline-high turbo-language – a quote: “He’d operated on an almost permanent adrenaline high, a byproduct of youth and proficiency, jacking into a custom cyberspace deck that projected his disembodied consciousness into the consensual hallucination that was the matrix.” I started with an A5 sheet of 300 gsm watercolour paper, and used heavily water-diluted Isatis Tinctoria to paint in the light-blue background. The data towers in the matrix were coloured with a felt-tip pen, dipped in pure ink. The code in the matrix flows from the data towers, and was written with a 1.1 stub Edison Collier. Gravity has no place in the matrix – so the people living in it can assume any position. The reality in the upper-left corner was drawn with a fine brush and Q-tips. The main character is ready to leave reality, and dive into the vortex of cyberspace. The end-result gives you an idea of what can be achieved with Isatis Tinctoria as a drawing ink. Conclusion With this 2021 Limited Edition, Rohrer and Klingner delivered a beautiful soft & muted blue with purple undertones, that is already reaching “unobtainium” status. If you thrive on vibrant inks, this one will not be for you. But if you enjoy dusty and toned-down inks, then Isatis Tinctoria is sure to please you. In my opinion, it sits among the great ones in this category. If you can still get hold of a bottle, don’t hesitate and buy it immediately. You will not be disappointed! Technical test results on Rhodia N° 16 notepad paper, written with Lamy Safari, M-nib Back-side of writing samples on different paper types
  3. This started because I like fineliners, I had a dim memory of experimenting with technical pens way back, and I like the many of the colours in Rohrer & Klingner's Antiktusche line. So, a few weeks ago, I got really interested in the possibility of using acrylic inks, which is what they are, in technical pens. (I like self contained pens instead of dip pens. Personal taste.) By the way, technical pens or dip pens or whatever, go and have a look at those Antiktusche colours. I higly recommend not only Rohrer & Klingner's website, but the swabs at http://www.kalligraphie.ch/store/index.php/cat/c113_Rohrer-s-Antiktusche.html. If you live in Europe, you might then want to buy your ink there as well, to support them for putting up these helpful swabs. Anyway... First, I searched this forum for useful information. Unfortunately, you mostly get people who do not really read the question and then give you advice they have heard somewhere. In other words: You ask, can acrylic inks be used in technical pens, and people will give you categorical advice like, only fountain pen ink should bne used in fountain pens! Ah. Quite. The technical pen is not a fountain pen. Also: As I have since learned, even fountain pens can take acrylic inks, provided you are prepared for extra work and care. If you use old and / or expensive pens, it makes sense to take no rists. If you are open to trying some weirder things, mess around! Second, I mailed both Rotring and Rohrer & Klingner. Rotring, unsurprisingly, will tell you that only inks made by Rotring are safe for their pens. If you used anything else, you void the warranty. Rohrer & Klingner will tell you that, in principle, their Inks are fine for the Isograph, the Rapidograph, even the Rotring Art Pen. The important bit is the "in principle". Those pens are designed with highly pigmented ink in mind, so that is not going to be your problem. The acrylic bit is going to make things risky. If acrylic ink dries, it stops being water solluble. So, if you let a pen dry out, you could end up with a solid mass which cannot be cleaned from your pen. Third, I have begun buying technical pens from various manufacturers, and not all of them have arived, yet. I have also begun experimenting with a few of those Antiktusche inks. What I have not yet done is let a pen dry out completely and see what can be done with the cleaner fluids from either Rotring or Rohrer & Klingner. Once all the pens I ordered have arrived, I will write something about how they compare. And sooner or later, of course one will dry up. So I will then post about the experience of cleaning it. Bottom line so far: You can get some techical pens for under € 10. There is no reason not to play around with acrylic ink in a technical pen, even if you fear it will kill the pen eventually. You can do a lot worse with € 10, I am sure. Also: Acrylic ink, unlike fountain pen ink, turns out to be amazing for writing postcards, which these days are often very bad at handling fountain pen ink. I kave some cards which turn into an absolute nightmare at the first drop of even my best behaved inks. Acrylic ink works like a charm! * Thanks to Rohrer & Klingner, as well as RoyalBlueNotebooks and fiberdrunk for help / advice.
  4. Three 'taupe' (grey brown) fountain pen inks, two French, one German: J. Herbin La Perle des Encres Cacao du Bresil L'Artisan Pastellier Classique Brun Ours Rohrer & Klingner Schreibtinte Sepia These three colors are very close. Two of them are nearly indistinguishable, at least to me, but there are differences. I'm tentatively planning a combined review of these three similarly-colored inks but, in the meantime, here's a teaser quiz: three writing samples with my normal, quick note-taking hand, all using the same type of pen - 3 different Pilot 78Gs with 'B' nibs, a dry pen with a fairly crisp italic nib that I enjoy a lot - Rhodia paper from a pad, and each writing sample uses a different one of the above three inks. The photos were taken in the same light at nearly the same time (late afternoon indirect sun). The goal of this quiz is to match the ink - Cacao du Bresil, Brun Ours, & Sepia - used with each writing sample: A, B, & C. After you have had a few days to take a guess I will try to post chromatography photos. And your impressions of the inks are welcome and encouraged, of course!
  5. visvamitra

    Sepia - Rohrer & Klingner

    Rohrer & Klingner operates since 1892. At the moment it's the fifth generation of the family that manages the company. I guess that after 122 years they know what they are doing. R&K inks offer amazing quality for amazing price. In my country a bnottle of R&K ink costs 5-6 $. I know it's a bit more expensive in America, yet I believe the price is still reasonable. I find it interesting that Rohrer & Klingner seems to focus mainly on the content and not on the bottles. Inks come in industrial looking bottle taht is quite handy but there's just nothing fancy about it. It's surprising. http://www.rohrer-klingner.de/fileadmin/_migrated/pics/schreibtinte_top_03.jpg Anyway they offer eighteen colors, some stunning, some boring but all have good qualities and are easy to clean. Alt-bordeaux Alt-Goldgrun Blu Mare Blue Permanent Cassia Fernambuc Helianthus Leipziger-Schwarz Magenta Morinda Royal Blue Salix Scabiosa Sepia Smaragdgrun Solferino Verdigris Verdura It's time to re-review this inks. Sepia is actually one of my all - time favorites sepias. It's cheap, it flows nicely, it behaves well and I enjoy the hue a lot. What else could I possibly want? This is a color you could easily use on a daily basi - cool choice for business people who want something else then black or blue. There's nothing wrong in stepping a little bit out of the crowd. The flow is smooth. Drying time is reasonable. Drops of ink on kitchen towel Software ID Color range Tomoe River, Lamy 2000, medium nib Leuchtturm1917, Kaweco Skyline Sport, double broad Clairefontaine, Gama Airborne, M Water resistance
  6. visvamitra

    Smaragdgrun - Rohrer & Klingner

    Rohrer & Klingner operates since 1892. At the moment it's the fifth generation of the family that manages the company. I guess that after 122 years they know what they are doing. R&K inks offer amazing quality for amazing price. In my country a bnottle of R&K ink costs 5-6 $. I know it's a bit more expensive in America, yet I believe the price is still reasonable. I find it interesting that Rohrer & Klingner seems to focus mainly on the content and not on the bottles. Inks come in industrial looking bottle taht is quite handy but there's just nothing fancy about it. It's surprising. http://www.rohrer-klingner.de/fileadmin/_migrated/pics/schreibtinte_top_03.jpg Anyway they offer eighteen colors, some stunning, some boring but all have good qualities and are easy to clean. Alt-bordeaux Alt-Goldgrun Blu Mare Blue Permanent Cassia Fernambuc Helianthus Leipziger-Schwarz Magenta Morinda Royal Blue Salix Scabiosa Sepia Smaragdgrun Solferino Verdigris Verdura It's time to re-review these inks. Rohrer and Klingner Smaragdgrun is my least favorite R&K ink. I hate this color range. Viscerally. The saturation, shading, and flow are all pretty average. The water resistance is practically non existent. The ink dries pretty fast. It has good shading potential and in wet pen and on right paper it produces kind of black-red sheen. Drops of ink on kitchen towel Software ID Color range Maruman, Lamy 2000, broad nib Leuchtturm1917, Kaweco Skyline Sport, double broad RHodia, Kaweco Skyline Sport, broad
  7. R & K sketchINK Marlene…. In my exploration of waterproof inks, I was long intrigued by the beauty of Marlene. It’s one of those rich full-bodied blues with lovely, lovely shading with Ahab. It’s an that ink that makes me happy. As I wrote I realized I was whistling this tune. A lovely nostalgic song, from one of the darkest hours in human history. Yet also a song that saved two lives. I often wonder if the marketing guys at R&K gave this name consciously, after Marlene Dietrich and her seminal movie the Blue Angel or if it’s all just subconscious… Here are my impressions…. · Pens used: Ahab, Jinhao 450 · Shading: Beautiful with Ahab · Ghosting: Depending nib/ flow combination · Bleed through: As above. · Flow Rate: Really nice… · Lubrication: Good · Nib Dry-out: No. · Start-up: Depends on the pen. · Saturation: A lovely deep sky blue… · Shading Potential: Oh yes…. · Sheen: Some on TR · Spread / Feathering / Woolly Line: None · Nib Creep / “Crud”: Yes on some pens… · Staining (pen): Nope. · Clogging: Nope. But I guess it would help to use a pen wash. · Water resistance: Oh yes. · Availability: Only in bottle. Chromatography Swabs Written text on Rhodia Whimsical text on Midori - with Ahab
  8. Hello everybody! It's my first time in this subforum, so please alert me if I'm doing something wrong. I have somehow accumulated over 20 different bottles of ink and 50 samples in the past two years. Love the variety, but some of these bottles don't get much use, and the ink in them just ages on my shelf. That's been bothering me a lot, since they're actually superb inks that just have had the bad luck of ending up in the hands of someone who doesn't appreciate them the way they deserve. So I'd like to send some of these out as big 5ml samples to anyone who's interested, in exchange for the same courtesy. I feel that that way, each of us gets to try new inks, and since everybody would pay postage, it wouldn't cost one more than the other. Full-sized bottles: De Atramentis AubergineDiamine AmaranthDiamine Ancient CopperDiamine Autumn OakDiamine Asa BlueDiamine BilberryDiamine Classic GreenDiamine Earl GreyDiamine Golden BrownDiamine Majestic BlueDiamine OxbloodDiamine SyrahJ. Herbin Bouquet d'AntanJ. Herbin Lie de ThéJ. Herbin Poussière de LuneKWZ HoneyKWZ MaroonNoodler's Heart of DarknessRohrer & Klingner Alt-GoldgrünRohrer & Klingner HelianthusRohrer & Klingner SalixRohrer & Klingner SepiaSailor Jentle/Shikiori MiruaiSailor Jentle/Shikiori Oku-YamaSailor Jentle/Shikiori Rikyu-ChaSailor Jentle/Shikiori Tokiwa-MatsuSailor Jentle/Shikiori Yama-DoriSailor Nano Sei-Boku Samples: Diamine China BlueL'Artisan Pastellier Callifolio Heure DoréeSailor Jentle/Shikiori Waka-UguisuJ. Herbin Vert OliveSuper5 Frankfurt
  9. I don’t know if it’s the warm and sunny weather that just hit the northeast after a cold spell, but, more than ever, I’m not ready for summer to end! So to keep the summery vibe going, I thought why not do a comparison of turquoise and “beachy blue" inks. This is by no means a comprehensive review, because I’m missing some great turquoise inks, such as Sheaffer and Lamy Turquoise, but I saw a post come up on the boards with questions about turquoises, so I wanted to share samples of the ones I have. The 15 inks tested are: Caran d’Ache Turquoise, Omas Turquoise, Rohrer & Klingner Blu Mare, J. Herbin Bleu Pervenche, Pilot Iroshizuku Ama-Iro, Waterman Inspired Blue, Pelikan Turquoise, Montblanc Honore de Balzac Dandy Turquoise, Diamine Aqua Blue, Visconti Turquoise, Pelikan Edelstein Topaz, Pilot Iroshizuku Kon-Peki, Diamine Asa Blue, Diamine Florida Blue and Diamine Mediterranean Blue. The writing samples were done using a 1950s 146 and a Pilot Custom 74 B nib ground down to a smooth stub by Mike Masuyama. All samples were tested on Rhodia paper. Ink Swabs: Ink on Paper Towel: Top Row: Caran d’Ache Turquoise, Omas Turquoise, Rohrer & Klingner Blu Mare, J. Herbin Bleu Pervenche, Pilot Iroshizuku Ama-Iro, Waterman Inspired Blue, Pelikan Turquoise Bottom Row: Montblanc Honore de Balzac Dandy Turquoise, Diamine Aqua Blue, Visconti Turquoise, Pelikan Edelstein Topaz, Pilot Iroshizuku Kon-Peki, Diamine Asa Blue, Diamine Florida Blue and Diamine Mediterranean Blue Best Flow and Smoothness: J. Herbin Bleu Pervenche Bleu Pervenche wins hands down for me in this category and is miles ahead of every other ink in this review. With that said, although it has an excellent flow, l wish Bleu Pervenche felt a little smoother (to match the smoothness of my favorite inks). However, this is the only turquoise with a regular spot in my ink rotation. Best Turquoise Color: Rohrer & Klingner Blu Mare This is by far my favorite shade of turquoise. It offers a nice mix of blue and green that leans more towards the blue side (which I prefer). In a wet nib, it is the most vibrant of the turquoise inks tested - so vibrant in fact that it makes me want to pull out a pair of sunglasses . The ink has a good flow (though not as high as Bleu Pervenche) but is missing the high level of smoothness I look for in a go-to ink. However, I love the color so much that I did get a bottle. Best Beachy Blue Color: Pilot Iroshizuku Ama-Iro and Diamine Florida Blue (Tie) I love the color of both of these inks, but I do not own bottles of either. I consider Ama-Iro to a "beachy blue" rather than a turquoise because it needs a little more green to be a true turquoise. I really love its bright, light blue color, which screams summer fun, but didn't enjoy the feeling of writing with the ink enough in the flexy 146 to buy a full bottle especially given its higher price point. I should note that I may have been especially tough on Ama-Iro because I was expecting a higher level of smoothness from an Iroshizuku ink. Florida Blue and Mediterranean Blue are close enough in color that someone looking to keep their ink spending to a minimum wouldn't need to own both. Florida Blue has a better flow, and, since I like wetter inks, I wouldn't think twice about using it over Mediterranean Blue. (Mediterranean blue is not a dry ink but someone looking for less wetness might prefer it; it is also a little lighter and exhibits slightly more shading than its Floridian counterpart.) Highest Sheening Ink (on Rhodia): Pilot Iroshizuku Kon-Peki Kon-Peki is not a monster sheener on Rhodia (like some of the Sailor inks I’ve recently tried) but still offers a subtle and beautiful pink shimmering halo around its blue letters. Some posts have asked how it compares to Edelstein Topaz and, as others have noted, both inks are similar in that they are cerulean blues with pink sheen. (I've noticed that Topaz sheens tremendously on Tomoe River Paper, but in this comparison it barely showed any sheen around the letters.) If I had to choose only one of the two inks, it would be Kon-Peki. The color is brighter and the ink has a better flow. Lowest Performer: Caran d’Ache Turquoise I really did not like this ink and was expecting more from a $30+ ink. It was so thin that it took the fun out of writing with my favorite pen (and I almost stopped the review to change writers). Other notable mentions: Light Turquoise: Visconti and Omas Turquoise (tie) Both inks are on the lighter end of the turquoise spectrum and could be a good option for someone looking for such a shade. I prefer the flow of the Omas but like the color of the Visconti better. (I would have liked for the Visconti to perform more like its brother ink, Visconti Blue, which offers a smoother writing experience.) Dark Beachy Blue: Diamine Asa Blue Asa Blue is a beautiful and interesting color in that it is paradoxically both dark and beachy. It has a good flow but an ok smoothness. Montblanc Dandy Turquoise Alternative: Pelikan Turquoise I love this shade of turquoise and have found that with the right pen and paper combination it can offer wonderful color variation. (I've noticed much more color variation using a Visconti HS.) For anyone who was not able to get a bottle during its limited run, I think that Pelikan Turquoise is a pretty close alternative.
  10. penzel_washinkton

    Rohrer & Klingner Kastanienbraun (Maroon)

    Rohrer & Klingner is continuing their Limited Edition yearly inks after the Aubergine last year. This year it is labelled "R & K Kastanienbraun" or Maroon. https://www.rohrer-klingner.de/?page_id=1056&lang=en Looks more brownish and not maroon to me though...
  11. This is my first review here. It was also unplanned, I just wanted to make a scan for another thread I was replying to, and it exploded into this handwritten review. Which is admittedly not the best, but I hope it is helpful to somebody at least because damn, it took a long time to scan in and resize all my pigeon scratch. There are scans, there are potato camera photos. I didn't bother with photographing all the pages I wrote because I think you guys can get the idea of what my terrible camera can bring across, and the scans are more readable. No colour adjustments anywhere for anything whatsoever. I bought this ink to do watercolour drawings and fill out my tax forms, and it's serving its purpose well so far. It does smell rather strongly of "chemicals" when you open the bottle, not in the rotting way, just in the "don't sniff the glue, kids, it's bad for your brain" way. Obviously I have no idea what I am doing here. Enjoy! Oxford Optik Paper. Left: scan, Right: photo "Conceptum" notebook paper, AKA the cheap stuff that doesn't like fountain pens. Front and back. Front edited because of a very lazy token desire for privacy. Everything else is Leuchtturm paper. Water test with actual beads of water on the paper: Left scan, right photo. This is POST water-test. Left: back of page above, right, start of mandatory review topics: Poor quality nib creep picture, but the creep is bad enough that you can still see it anyhow: bottle pic from Seitz Kreuznach: That's all she wrote! EDIT: Very important caveat: I have never left this ink in my pen long enough to see what the long-term effects might be (long enough, like, "overnight".) There are warnings all over the label to not let this ink dry out in your pen, so I usually ink it up for a targetted use, write a little afterwards (like this review), then de-ink the pen because I'm done with it.
  12. Rohrer & Klingner is an old German company, established in Leipzig in 1907, reputed to be one of the best ink manufacturers in the world(yet at the same time keeping a low profile....or at least seems so IMO). Most of their inks are well-behaved, relatively cheap, and with steady quality. Among their 18 regular colors, two are iron-gall inks, and Scabiosa is one of them. The word "Scabiosa" refers to a genus in the honeysuckle family of flowering plants. FIY, here are some beautiful Scabiosa flowers( picture credits: google search) http://i651.photobucket.com/albums/uu239/chingdamosaic/Scabiosa_02_zpsvpuxdlmx.jpg http://i651.photobucket.com/albums/uu239/chingdamosaic/Scabiosa_01_zpssjt0kwrh.jpg http://i651.photobucket.com/albums/uu239/chingdamosaic/Scabiosa_03_zpspniucpuj.jpg Botanically/Academically, "Scabiosa" in Chinese should be translated as 山蘿蔔, literally meaning "Mountain Radish." However, because "Mountain Radish" sounds so NOT commercially appealing, when R&K's Taiwanese agent first introduced this ink, they renamed it 埃及玫瑰---"Egyptian Rose." Many FP users(yes, including me) fell for this exotic name, and purchased a bottle before learning more about the ink itself. Well, salute this ingenious marketing strategy! lol Now back to the theme.... First, let's take a look at the bottle (Scabiosa on the right): http://i651.photobucket.com/albums/uu239/chingdamosaic/Scabiosa_00_zpspgsmbuca.jpg R&K's trademark is their uniform bottle design: dark brown glass bottle (in order to protect the ink from light exposure) and metal cap. We often joke about it resembling cough syrup, or any other thing that you'd more likely find in a pharmacy instead of a FP shop. Here are some writing samples: http://i651.photobucket.com/albums/uu239/chingdamosaic/Scabiosa_04_zps8q1p4sdi.jpg It's dark purple with tints of gray and blue. Close-up 1 (sorry for fuzzy picture) http://i651.photobucket.com/albums/uu239/chingdamosaic/Scabiosa_05_zps7rfwp8bn.jpg The purple color is lighter and more visible in a finer nib (in this example: LAMY Safari EF). You can see that even in a rather dry pen, on some random cheap paper, this ink still shows a rich shading. Close-up 2 http://i651.photobucket.com/albums/uu239/chingdamosaic/Scabiosa_07_zpsh1gk062y.jpg If you use a broader/wetter pen(in this example: Brause no.361 dip pen), it gets darker and can almost pass for black. Close-up 3 http://i651.photobucket.com/albums/uu239/chingdamosaic/Scabiosa_06_zpsoxg21um6.jpg If you apply water to the writing while the ink is still wet, the purple/pink dye would be washed away, leaving a light gray trace. And since iron-gall inks feature being permanent/waterproof/light fast, here is a water-resistance test done after the ink is fully dry: http://i651.photobucket.com/albums/uu239/chingdamosaic/Scabiosa_08_zpshqfgs90x.jpg I dripped some water on the paper and left it for hours. Outcome: http://i651.photobucket.com/albums/uu239/chingdamosaic/Scabiosa_09_zpseaj0fub3.jpg Pink dye dissolved after a few minutes, but the lines remain as clear and dark as before. Thus, if you quickly dab away the water while it's still wet, there will hardly leave any trace(shown below ). Here are some other writing sample I did with other pen/paper combination: 1. LAMY Safari EF on yellow ROSSI paper (English subtitle edited on Photoshop) http://i651.photobucket.com/albums/uu239/chingdamosaic/Scabiosa_10_zpsesiucz0s.jpg 2. Dip pen on yellow ROSSI paper http://i651.photobucket.com/albums/uu239/chingdamosaic/Scabiosa_11_zpsnqs3nvug.jpg When I did the smearing(bottom right), the ink wasn't fully dry yet, and some black particle dissolved... This doesn't happen all the time, though. 3. LAMY Safari EF on MUJI white grid paper http://i651.photobucket.com/albums/uu239/chingdamosaic/Scabiosa_12_zpsauwa479x.jpg Usually the color of iron-gall inks fades and becomes darker and darker over time, but sometimes there will be exceptions, due to the paper and humidity( I guess....) This is a doodle I did with Scabiosa, dip pen, on some cheap scratch paper, in June 2013: (wet) http://i651.photobucket.com/albums/uu239/chingdamosaic/Scabiosa_13_zpscsimvun9.jpg (dry) http://i651.photobucket.com/albums/uu239/chingdamosaic/Scabiosa_14_zpsoe9yozdt.jpg And then I re-discovered it lately when tidying up my room: http://i651.photobucket.com/albums/uu239/chingdamosaic/Scabiosa_15_zpsvwfwc7up.jpg It's not purple anymore! More like a lighter wine-color, or rusty red(because of the iron in it?). .......I kind of like this surprise : ) Conclusion Saturation: high, but low chroma( they don't contradict, right?) Shading: rich Sheen: not observed so far. It's a rather "matte" ink. Flow: relatively dry, but still writes smoothly even in extra fine nib. Feathering: none (performs nicely even on cheap paper) Bleed-through: none (performs nicely even on cheap paper) Show-through: very little (performs nicely even on cheap paper) Cleaning: if you always clean the pen right after using, some soaking and flushing with water will easily do the job. None of my pens has been stained or damaged after two years of constant usage. Waterproof: yes Other features: light fast; pH neutral. Other notes: the pink that shows after water application is lovely. Overall, I not only like this ink/color, I feel like I can TRUST it like an old loyal friend. This is my all-time favorite for secret diary, especially when I'm writing something really personal/emotional/confessional. I am ambitious to try as many different inks as possible in my limited life, but R&K Scabiosa is, so far, the only one I would empty a whole bottle and get a second one.
  13. senzen

    Verdigris Comparison

    I loved Verdigris since I got it, but haven't used it as much because its Sonnet always evaporating quickly and it came a lot darker. It finally dawned on me to use it with my new m205. Row 1 of other colours: Ama Iro, Kon Peki, Équinoxe 6, Souten, Tsuyu Kusa, Asa Gao, Myosotis, Ajisai. Row 2: Chiku Rin, Vert Empire, Verde Muschiato, Ina Ho, Inti, Lie de Thé, Yama Guri, Perle Noire. Row 3: Mandarin, Fuyu Gaki, Orange Indien, Ancient Copper, Rouge Hematite, Poppy Red, Perle Noire. I never thought I'd like a grey ink but there you have it, part of the switch to the m205 came about as I realized it's one of my favorites, and I have to confess I don't really care for Myosotis in its regular pale self, but with that pen it's inevitable it will get darker, which I actually quite like.
  14. Does anyone have both inks and could enlighten me as to what their differences are? I've been eyeing that colour for quite some time now, and my local art supply store still has plenty of stock of the LE ink. Dominique
  15. FeloniousMonk

    My First Dip Nib...

    Hello kind sirs and ladies, I recently acquired this Mabie Todd 313 long dip nib that had been installed in a Watermans #12 eyedropper. This is my first dip nib, my first Mabie Todd, and my oldest pen by at least a couple decades. A sample via dip test follows below. Best regards, Eric
  16. visvamitra

    Rohrer & Klingner Fernambuk

    Rohrer & Klingner operates since 1892. At the moment it's the fifth generation of the family that manages the company. I guess that after 122 years they know what they are doing. R&K inks offer amazing quality for amazing price. In my country a bnottle of R&K ink costs 5-6 $. I know it's a bit more expensive in America, yet I believe the price is still reasonable. I find it interesting that Rohrer & Klingner seems to focus mainly on the content and not on the bottles. Inks come in industrial looking bottle taht is quite handy but there's just nothing fancy about it. It's surprising. Anyway they offer eighteen colors, some stunning, some boring but all have good qualities and are easy to clean. Alt-bordeaux Alt-Goldgrun Blu Mare Blue Permanent Cassia Fernambuc Helianthus Leipziger-Schwarz Magenta Morinda Royal Blue Salix Scabiosa Sepia Smaragdgrun Solferino Verdigris Verdura It's time to re-review these inks. Fernambuk is an interesting color but it's difficult to say / decide if it's red or pink. I don't mind the color but I can understand those of you who think about dumping it out of the pen a second after putting the nib to paper. I have such reaction to cyano-turquoises. Flow: the Ink feels wet. Not as wet as J. Herbin Eclat de Saphire but it's very wet ink. Saturation: level of saturation is satisfying for my needs. The ink doesn’t look oversaturated, it remains fully legible in all light conditions. Lubrication: good Drying time: rather reasonable. 15-20 seconds on Rhodia, 10 – 15 seconds on absorbent paper. Clogging issues: None experienced. The ink may dry in the nib but only after few minutes. You can leave the pen uncapped for 2-3 minutes and everything should be fine. Feathering: visible feathering on Moleskine. Bleedthrough: experienced strongly on Moleskine Water resistance: this ink isn't water resistant. Drops of ink on kitchen towel Software ID Color range Leuchtturm1917, Kaweco Skyline Sport, double broad Maruman, Kaweco Skyline Sport, broad Moleskine, Kaweco Sport, broad nib Bleedthrough on Moleskine Rhofia DotPad, Kaweco Sport, broad nib Rhodai, Kaweco Sport, broad nib
  17. visvamitra

    Rohrer & Klingner - 18 Inks

    Rohrer & Klingner operates since 1892. At the moment it's the fifth generation of the family that manages the company. I guess that after 122 years they know what they are doing. R&K inks offer amazing quality for amazing price. In my country a bnottle of R&K ink costs 5-6 $. I know it's a bit more expensive in America, yet I believe the price is still reasonable. I find it interesting that Rohrer & Klingner seems to focus mainly on the content and not on the bottles. Inks come in industrial looking bottle taht is quite handy but there's just nothing fancy about it. It's surprising. http://www.rohrer-klingner.de/fileadmin/_migrated/pics/schreibtinte_top_03.jpg Anyway they offer eighteen colors, some stunning, some boring but all have good qualities and are easy to clean. http://imageshack.com/a/img742/3085/WHCjxM.jpg Let's check them. http://imageshack.com/a/img742/4356/PJrxLY.jpg Helianthus: intense, dark yellow. In broad nib I can see it as a daily writer. http://imageshack.com/a/img540/3449/gDAFEH.jpg Fernambuk: red with some pink accents. Nice, decent, smooth and consistent flow. http://imageshack.com/a/img904/921/2Ss5YZ.jpg Morinda: one of my favourite red inks. I like the hue and great lubrication it provides to my dry writing Pilot 78G with broad nib. http://imageshack.com/a/img631/8620/rvsLyH.jpg Alt-Bordeaux: pale and boring in dry nibs, really nice in wet nibs. http://imageshack.com/a/img540/7069/qIjHwr.jpg Magenta: magenta. Intense, eye-catching, but too bright to my taste. http://imageshack.com/a/img540/8971/cq9ran.jpg Solferino: screaming, popping purplish magenta. I like it. http://imageshack.com/a/img661/9591/lJHbRx.jpg Cassia: decent violet. http://imageshack.com/a/img540/7310/gCAFFH.jpg Scabiosa: waterproof, nice, dusty color. Good choice. http://imageshack.com/a/img745/1412/2Eswf9.jpg Blu Mare: lively, saturated blue. Not bad. http://imageshack.com/a/img673/9058/2RkapU.jpg Konigsblau nice, decent ink. The thing is there's so many blue inks on the market and there's just nothing special about this one. http://imageshack.com/a/img540/1746/Hju3nH.jpg Blau Permanent: not really permanent but it shows some waterproofness. Good ink, good saturation, nice color. http://imageshack.com/a/img674/6130/SIeuSi.jpg Salix: waterproof, famous R&K ink. I don't like the color. http://imageshack.com/a/img907/4881/C9frH5.jpg Smaragdgrun: meh. I dislike this kind of greens. http://imageshack.com/a/img538/9308/A0Mhn1.jpg Verdura: decent green. But there are better ones on the market. http://imageshack.com/a/img674/1975/eE8Ceg.jpg Alt-Goldgrun: great, unique ink. A winner. http://imageshack.com/a/img661/9878/E2RSSw.jpg Sepia: greyish brown. Calm. I do like it. http://imageshack.com/a/img673/1081/H9TBfj.jpg Verdigris: greenish blue/black. Nice one. http://imageshack.com/a/img911/1756/oPZABq.jpg Leipziger-Schwarz: blueish bl;ack but still black. I dislike blacks and this one won't change my taste. The review was made with dry writing tool: Pilot 78G with broad nib. You may think that the ciolor are more intense in your notebook. But that's how these pens write. SWABS (Mondi 90g) http://imageshack.com/a/img674/5328/GeFHAj.jpg http://imageshack.com/a/img910/4199/oYRedV.jpg Gems (cut in PS from the photo made in intense sunlight) http://imageshack.com/a/img538/3681/0YU474.jpg http://imageshack.com/a/img540/7862/g3II4P.jpg DROPS OF INK ON KITCHEN TOWEL http://imageshack.com/a/img633/2953/wQ5AX0.jpg http://imageshack.com/a/img742/7510/Uf6b8l.jpg http://imageshack.com/a/img673/3977/1tGdYC.jpg http://imageshack.com/a/img909/9833/NG4eDI.jpg http://imageshack.com/a/img905/2186/Vjkgo1.jpg
  18. RoyalBlueNotebooks

    Transatlantic Crv

    My second CRV ever. Thank you, amberleadavis! I'm glad I got to see so many inks. I had never seen any of them on paper in person. These are not all the pages, I'm trying to come up with things to doodle in the other pages. Seitz-Kreuznach Palm Green and Pelikan 4001 Dark Green. Seitz-Kreuznach Palm Green + Rohrer & Klingner Verdigris
  19. visvamitra

    Verdigris - Rohrer & Klingner

    Rohrer & Klingner operates since 1892. At the moment it's the fifth generation of the family that manages the company. I guess that after 122 years they know what they are doing. R&K inks offer amazing quality for amazing price. In my country a bnottle of R&K ink costs 5-6 $. I know it's a bit more expensive in America, yet I believe the price is still reasonable. I find it interesting that Rohrer & Klingner seems to focus mainly on the content and not on the bottles. Inks come in industrial looking bottle taht is quite handy but there's just nothing fancy about it. It's surprising. http://www.rohrer-klingner.de/fileadmin/_migrated/pics/schreibtinte_top_03.jpg Anyway they offer eighteen colors, some stunning, some boring but all have good qualities and are easy to clean. http://imageshack.com/a/img742/3085/WHCjxM.jpg Alt_bordeaux Alt-Goldgrun Blu Mare Blue Permanent Cassia Fernambuc Helianthus Leipziger-Schwarz Magenta Morinda Royal Blue Salix Scabiosa Sepia Smaragdgrun Solferino Verdigris Verdura It's time to re-review this ink. I'll start with Verdigris. When I first bought this ink three years ago I loved it. Then, after few months, my taste changed and I stopped using this ink. Recently I've rediscovered this ink. This ink is very smooth and is a real joy to write with. Dry time leaves something to be desired, but it's not terrible. Drops of ink on kitchen towel Software ID Color Range Tomoe River, Kaweco Classic Sport, B Leuchtturm 1917, Kaweco Claasic Sport, B Lyreco Budget notebook, St Dupont Fidelio, M Comparison
  20. visvamitra

    Rohrer & Klingner Lilly Sketch Ink

    Rohrer&Klingner produces wonderful inks. I think it's the company that's criminally underrated in fountain pen afficionados circles. sketchINK® is a range of 10 inks for fountain pens. They are - as most pigment inks - exceptionally waterproof and lightfast. R&K uses nano pigments to enable an optimal ink flow. However, it has to be said that waterproof inks can cause clotting in fountain pens. Therefore it's reasonable to clean pens filled with it regularly. I bought two of these inks Lilly and Emma. Both are nice and behave fairly well for a pigment ink. Bottle The inks are sold in 50 ml glass bottle. While it's not as nice as some ink bottles are, it's practical. Ink Splash The ink feels well lubricated and flows well. I haven't tried it in drier nib, however it cooperates with this stub flawlessly. I had no problems with starting to write after having the pen unused for a week. I haven't experienced any clogging or drying on the nib. On the other hand, so far I've been using this ink only in one fountain pen so my experience is limited. Drops of ink on kitchen towel Color ID Color range Copy paper, Perun Custom fountain pen, stub 1.1 Fabriano, Perun Custom fountain pen, stub 1.1 Rhodia, Perun Custom fountain pen, stub 1.1 Water resistance Fully water resistant. I'll add some photo later.
  21. I'd been meaning to do this comparison for some time, but either didn't have the time, some pens wouldn't cooperate, or the inks wouldn't come out as I thought they should. Missing are Vert Empire and Perle Noire, orphaned by an uncooperating Kaweco Sport and a Penmanship's converter I gave away. I have learned a lot on these forums so I hope this also helps others, particularly when comparing specific inks, like blue greens, blue purples, reds and oranges. The paper is HP 32 lbs, which all pens glide on, except for the Waterman le Man 100 with Mandarin which doesn't like this paper and sometimes stops flowing - there is always one! Oh and a Platinum Cool only starts reliably upside down, on any paper, I thought I'd cured it but nope. The differences between Souten, Kon Peki and Équinoxe 6 are subtle, and depend greatly on the nib and paper, and even on the pen and the time of day, as evaporation will change their colour drastically; but to my eye they clearly go from more blue to more green; they are all spectacular, Souten does have a funky smell, luckily I have a cold so I can't smell it as much right now, none of my other inks smell of anything. Some inks just make their pens glide, particularly Verde Muschiato and Verdigris. Some inks took a long time to show their true tone, like Myosotis (can look too dark, turns into a blue black), Lie de Thé (can look like milk chocolate), Orange Indien looks spectacular in this nib, a lot more boring with finer.
  22. For anyone interested Massdrop has Rohrer & Klingner ink 3 pack for $19.99. https://www.massdrop.com/buy/rohrer-klinger-writing-ink?utm_source=linkshare&referer=37X2GL
  23. visvamitra

    Magenta - Rohrer & Klingner

    Rohrer & Klingner operates since 1892. At the moment it's the fifth generation of the family that manages the company. I guess that after 122 years they know what they are doing. R&K inks offer amazing quality for amazing price. In my country a bnottle of R&K ink costs 5-6 $. I know it's a bit more expensive in America, yet I believe the price is still reasonable. I find it interesting that Rohrer & Klingner seems to focus mainly on the content and not on the bottles. Inks come in industrial looking bottle taht is quite handy but there's just nothing fancy about it. It's surprising. http://www.rohrer-klingner.de/fileadmin/_migrated/pics/schreibtinte_top_03.jpg Anyway they offer eighteen colors, some stunning, some boring but all have good qualities and are easy to clean. Alt-bordeaux Alt-Goldgrun Blu Mare Blue Permanent Cassia Fernambuc Helianthus Leipziger-Schwarz Magenta Morinda Royal Blue Salix Scabiosa Sepia Smaragdgrun Solferino Verdigris Verdura It's time to re-review these inks. Rohrer and Klingner Magenta is quite vibrant color. The flow is very nice as in most R&K inks. The dry time is pretty fast, around 15 seconds on Oxford Optic paper. The water resistance is low, but the advantage of that is it cleans easily from the pen. The shading isn't potent, but it's present. Personally I prefer Solferino but Magenta may appeal to those of us who enjoy punch-me-in-the-eyes colors. Drops of ink on kitchen towel Software ID Color range Maruman, Lamy 2000, broad nib Leuchtturm1917, Kaweco Skyline Sport, double broad Oxford Optic, Kaweco Skyline Sport, broad
  24. bstnnyc

    8 “Pinkish” Inks

    I've been wanting to try some kind of pinkish ink for a while. I didn’t want a pastel or cotton-candy pink, but other than that I was pretty open, so after going through the FPN boards and using the Goulet swatch tool, the eight finalists ranged from burgundy to magenta to purplish and reddish pinks: Diamine Syrah, Pilot Iroshizuku Yama-Budo, Rohrer & Klingner Magenta, Rohrer & Klingner Solferino, J. Herbin Rose Cyclamen, Pilot Iroshizuku Tsutsuji, J. Herbin Rouge Bourgogne, and Rohrer & Klingner Fernambuk. Although I liked some of the colors, I didn’t see myself using pink enough to warrant buying a full bottle (given that I am trying, though not very well , to stick to a stricter ink budget). I didn’t want the samples to go to waste though so I thought it might be helpful to post a comparison on here for anyone else who might also be thinking of going “pink.” The writing samples were done on Rhodia using a random steel nib pen (that I use as a dip pen) and a Pilot Custom 74 B nib ground down to a smooth stub by Mike Masuyama (also used as a dip pen to be able to test all the colors quickly). I’ve included a second set of samples on Tomoe River Paper, since some of these inks (especially given their sheen) could make for beautiful options for special letters, cards or notes on heavily "sheening" paper. PS I would need to ink a pen with it to accurately test its smoothness and flow, but if I had to pick one pink ink that I could see myself using often enough to purchase a full bottle it would be R&K Magenta. Which one of the eight would you pick? 1. On Rhodia: Closeups Ink Swabs 2. On Tomoe River Paper: Closeups Highest "Sheening" Ink Close-up Ink Swabs 3. Ink on Paper Towel: Top Row: Diamine Syrah, Pilot Iroshizuku Yama-Budo, Rohrer & Klingner Magenta, Rohrer & Klingner Solferino Bottom Row: J. Herbin Rose Cyclamen, Pilot Iroshizuku Tsutsuji, J. Herbin Rouge Bourgogne, Rohrer & Klingner Fernambuk
  25. alexander_k

    Three Ig Inks

    THREE IG INKS Waterproof, bulletproof, all kinds of inks that can withstand abuse from human malice or carelessness, the weather, time; I read about them and fail to find the fascination. First of all, I like inks that wash off easily from my hands, clothes and pens. I'm not that accident-prone but when I used to carry a Pelikan M600 in by breast pocket, many were the times when the cap unscrewed by itself and the pen decorated me with large blue blots. If those blots hadn't washed off, I might have given up on fountain pens - or carrying them around, at least. Secondly, what's the use of resistant inks when I write on paper, a carrier that can be completely destroyed so easily? Does it matter that the ink is still there when the sheet of paper has become pulp? I don't write anything that important that would be severely damaged by a droplet of fluid. So, you appreciate that I didn't get the inks I'm comparing here because they're waterproof; I just liked the colours and was curious to see how they behaved in my pens. The first is IG Blue #1 by KWZ Inks. Since I now have the delight of a local store that stocks KWZ (Fontoplumo), I decided to explore their products, including their IG range, since everybody told me that they were very well behaved. I liked it immediately, although it seemed rather dry for the Waterman Taperite I first inked with it. So, I tried it in one of my gushers, too, a Visconti Homo Sapiens with a medium nib reground into a CI by Oxonian, and the combination was a success. Interestingly, with time, ink flow in the Taperite improved, not to the level of e.g. Diamine Denim, but then that was a bit too much. The second IG ink I got was Rohrer & Klingner's Salix, just so that I would be able to make a comparison. I'm quite impressed by their inks, so I decided that yet another blue ink (I must have about twenty at the moment) was not superfluous if I were to form an opinion on IG inks through a hands-on comparison (I often use this excuse, that's why I have too many inks). It also helped that Couronne du Comte at Tilburg offered a generous discount to a visiting group of pen enthusiasts. Then I remembered that one of my favourite inks, Akkerman's Diep-duinwaterblauw, is reputedly an iron gall one, too, so I decided to include it in the comparison. THE SETUP OBSERVATIONS I love the colours of all three inks. The way the colour of IG Blue #1 and Salix changes as they dry on the page still catches my attention. Diep-duinwaterblauw remains the same but then it's the richest colour of the tree. The final greyish blue of IG Blue #1 is very much to my taste but the brighter blue of Salix seems more interesting in a finer nib. All three have enough shading. Concerning smearing, Diep-duinwaterblauw is the quickest to dry on paper, some twenty seconds ahead of the other two, which seem safe to touch after thirty seconds (or slightly longer in the case of Salix). Water resistance after a minute or so was high for Salix and IG Blue #1 (with the former performing slightly better in this respect) but less so for Diep-duinwaterblauw, which is nevertheless not marketed as water-resistant. In the smearing and water tests, the Taperite was used to represent IG Blue #1, as it was more comparable to the Marlen Aleph that was inked with Salix. In conclusion, I wholeheartedly recommend all three inks to people who know how to care for their pens. I don't know yet what the long-term effects of IG inks on the pens can be. More on that in a year or more; for the moment, I can confirm that the Parker 51 and Sheaffer Targa I keep inked with Diep-duinwaterblauw for a three years now have never given me any kind of trouble. THE PROOF The paper used must be in the area of 80g and is slightly less absorbent that common 80g copy paper. In the scan the colours seem just a smidgeon darker than in real life but their differences are well captured.





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