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  1. From the album: Size and shape comparisons

    Size comparison, from left to right, between: Pilot Elite 95s Platinum #3776 Century Sailor Professional Gear (in ‘Classic’ size, or full-sized, not Slim) Sailor Lecoule (which has the same size and shape as the Professional Gear Slim) Sailor Profit Junior Sailor Procolor 500, with the Shikiori Hisakata ‘Stardust’ shown here as an example of that design/model Sailor Promenade Sailor Profit Standard (aka 1911 Standard), with the Nagasawa Stationery Center exclusive Proske shown here as an example of that design/model Sailor Profit Black Luster (which is essentially just a Profit Large but with a metal gripping section) Sailor Profit21 (or just Profit, aka 1911 Large) Aurora Ottantotto (i.e. 88) Aurora Optima Pelikan M2xx Pelikan M6xx Pelikan M8xx See also:

    © A Smug Dill

  2. From the album: Size and shape comparisons

    Size comparison, from left to right, between: Pilot Elite 95s Platinum #3776 Century Sailor Professional Gear (in ‘Classic’ size, or full-sized, not Slim) Sailor Lecoule (which has the same size and shape as the Professional Gear Slim) Sailor Profit Junior Sailor Procolor 500, with the Shikiori Hisakata ‘Stardust’ shown here as an example of that design/model Sailor Promenade Sailor Profit Standard (aka 1911 Standard), with the Nagasawa Stationery Center exclusive Proske shown here as an example of that design/model Sailor Profit Black Luster (which is essentially just a Profit Large but with a metal gripping section) Sailor Profit21 (or just Profit, aka 1911 Large) Aurora Ottantotto (i.e. 88) Aurora Optima Pelikan M2xx Pelikan M6xx Pelikan M8xx See also:

    © A Smug Dill

  3. From the album: Size and shape comparisons

    From left to right: Platinum #3776 Century, Chartres Blue with rhodium trim Sailor Shikiori Hisakata ‘Stardust’, as an example of the Procolor 500 Sailor Professional Gear Imperial Black edition, as an example of the full-sized ProGear ‘Classic’ Sailor Profit Black Luster, as an example in the Profit Large (aka 1911 Large) form factor Sailor Proske (Nagasawa Stationery Center exclusive ‘Profit Skeleton’), as an example of the Profit Standard (aka 1911 Standard) See also:

    © A Smug Dill

  4. From the album: Size and shape comparisons

    From left to right: Platinum #3776 Century, Chartres Blue with rhodium trim Sailor Shikiori Hisakata ‘Stardust’, as an example of the Procolor 500 Sailor Professional Gear Imperial Black edition, as an example of the full-sized ProGear ‘Classic’ Sailor Profit Black Luster, as an example in the Profit Large (aka 1911 Large) form factor Sailor Proske (Nagasawa Stationery Center exclusive ‘Profit Skeleton’), as an example of the Profit Standard (aka 1911 Standard) See also:

    © A Smug Dill

  5. From the album: Size and shape comparisons

    A photo I've taken for someone who was interested in getting a non-Sailor pen with a Sailor nib.

    © A Smug Dill

  6. Eight Eleven units of the Sailor Profit Black Luster fountain pen with ruthenium-plated 21K gold Medium nibs (model 11-3048-420), and one unit with Fine nib (model 11-3048-220), are available on Amazon.co.jp – sold and fulfilled by Amazon.co.jp – at the moment for ¥19,755 each. That works out to approximately A$251, or US$179, by the current exchange rates. That's a drop of 10% since I placed my order for one with a Fine nib not even 24 hours ago, and it was a pain in the butt trying to cancel it (since Amazon.co.jp advised it was unable to intercept the dispatch) and re-buy at this price. I had to call the parcel courier service in Japan, as well as speak to Amazon.co.jp, to make it happen. Camelcamelcamel indicates that this is significantly lower than the lowest third-party prices seen on Amazon.com and Amazon.co.jp for these products, and is also (approximately) the lowest price† sold by Amazon.co.jp in almost three years. Obviously, there is the issue of how you're going to order one and get it 'home' or sent to you, if you're not in Japan. I don't know if Amazon.co.jp would ship it directly to you if you're in North America, but it won't ship to Australia. I'm using a reshipper to receive the goods on my behalf and then forward them to me at not-insignificant additional expense, but the total cost of acquisition is still a darn sight cheaper than, say, ordering it from a Japan-based seller via eBay.com.au or buying on Rakuten Ichiba (and/or Rakuten Global Market) today. Just thought I'd share the find with anyone who may be keen to get one, but don't want to pay the street price of US$400 or so. Update 1: I see the single unit with the Fine nib is now gone. That didn't take long! Update 2: It seems more stock with the Medium nib has been added. It'd be so much better if Amazon.co.jp added three units with Fine nibs instead. †I'm only able to be look at it in graphical form, without being able to review the specific numbers by data point, so the granularity is limited and my conclusion could be off by ¥50 or so.
  7. Driften

    Decided To Try Out Sailor

    I have several pilots (74-M, 91-F, 92-FM) along with other brands (Pelikan, TWSBI, Bexley), but have been thinking about a Platinum or Sailor. I decided to try out the Sailor 1911 Profit with the 14k MF nib. I like my Pilot FM better then F or M so I hope the MF will be a good choice in this case. I normally go for F in german made nibs. The 1911 looked like I has a more comfortable section for how I hold a pen, then the Platinum. I got it off eBay from Asian Treasure Hunt with converter for $69 plus shipping. I guess I will know how I like it in a week or so when it gets here from Japan. I will add pictures them, not that everybody in this group has not seem a 1911.
  8. Hi, A supplier in Japan shipped me my Sailor Profit 21k fine rhodium with only its usual cartridges instead of adding in the purchased converter (which is now on its way). What type of ink is usually in these cartridges please - non-water resistant or a water resistant nano-type pigment like their blue-black? Their English wasn't too understandable to me when discussing the converter so I didn't want to ask them in case confusion occurred. I intend to use Iro inks once the converter arrives so didn't want any unusual gunking in the pen if the inks are incompatible and I'd missed cleaning a tiny bit of the cartridge ink out. It's a pen I've wanted for some time so don't want to mess it up. I usually only use water for cleaning, so if there is a home made pen flush that will do the job of cleaning out Sailor's nano ink I'd be keen to know which recipe here on FPN might be best please (I have it in a dedicated Pilot that is coming up for its first clean anyway). Thanks.
  9. The first gold pen I bought was a Sailor 1911S. Because I am interested in matching pen and pencil sets, I went looking for a 1911 pencil. I found one, but for some reason its design was never updated, so it matches the old-style 1911 pen, not the new one. For those who may not know, Sailor at some point-- I’m not sure when—redesigned its popular 1911 line. The 1911 used to have a simpler nib engraving, a gold-plated ring at the bottom of the section instead of the top of the section as the current pens, and only one cap band as opposed to the two of current pens. Also, the color of the gold fittings was paler before the redesign; afterwards, the gold became yellower. I was quite surprised to find that the pencil matched the old pen, with one cap band and pale gold fittings. The ballpoint, which I also bought, was in the same way. Of course, then I had to go hunt down the correct vintage 1911 fountain pen. If my resume says I’m “detail oriented,” you know now it’s true. Anyway, these old pens are not often found in the United States, but I eventually found an old-style 1911L offered by a Japanese seller on a famous auction site, and with a few well-timed clicks my set was complete. I also bought a Sailor three-pen case because, at this point, why not? There are plenty of Sailor 1911 reviews on this Forum, but I don’t think any are for the old-style pen, or the matching pencil and ballpoint. So, here we go. Please excuse my utilitarian photography; I only have a simple point-and-shoot camera (and wouldn’t know how to use a DSLR if one descended from heaven into my lap anyway). Here we see the closed pen case. It’s called the Sailor Imperial Black case or something macho like that, but it strikes me as rather feminine: despite its nylon and leather (?) construction and black metal fittings, it sort of looks like a makeup case. 1 Case Closed by Jacob Marks, on Flickr The case actually closes with magnetic buttons, as you can see. The buckles are purely decorative. 2 Case Open by Jacob Marks, on Flickr 3 Case Open Flap Open by Jacob Marks, on Flickr 4 Decorative Buckles by Jacob Marks, on Flickr The case is mostly of nylon, with piping and details in leather or a leather-like material. For the price, I hope it’s leather. 5 Lining by Jacob Marks, on Flickr 6 Logo detail by Jacob Marks, on Flickr There is a little slot for holding spare cartridges. I use bottled ink, but have some cartridges stowed there for an emergency—though it would be an odd emergency indeed that required them. 7 Cart Storage Detail by Jacob Marks, on Flickr Here is our redoubtable trio of writing instruments. I call them Athos, Porthos, and Steve. 8 Pens Overview by Jacob Marks, on Flickr First, the fountain pen. Capped, it has a classic appearance. Its resemblance to Montblanc’s 146 is often noted. 9 Fountain Pen Capped by Jacob Marks, on Flickr It seems the pen is intended to be posted. It posts securely although the lines are not as clean as I would like. 10 Fountain Pen Posted by Jacob Marks, on Flickr The end of the barrel has a false blind cap. The ring, like the buckles on the case, is purely decorative. 10-2 False Blind Cap by Jacob Marks, on Flickr On to the business end. The nib has a simple design which I much prefer to the current one. The new nibs are quite busy and owe too much to that aforementioned German manufacturer. Unlike the current 1911L nibs, which to my knowledge are all 21k, this is a 14k nib. Some people consider 14k to be the best alloy for nibs because of its elasticity, with higher-karat nibs being too soft. That sort of thing is beyond my expertise. I’m more of liberal arts kind of guy. On the other hand, the redesign eliminates the ring at the bottom of the section, which is said to be a magnet for corrosion. This one seems to be in fine shape, though. 11 Nib Front 1 by Jacob Marks, on Flickr This nib is marked H-M. My guess is that stands for hard medium. The nib is not flexible or semi-flexible or even hemi-demi-semi-flexible, but neither is it rigid. It has some give. I would call it firm. To the disappointment of the spammers who fill my email inbox, I’m perfectly satisfied by how firm my pen is. 12 side nib by Jacob Marks, on Flickr The feed is a typical finned black plastic affair. 13 Feed by Jacob Marks, on Flickr The writing tip is smooth enough, and certainly a medium. Not interesting, but not bad. 14 Writing Surface by Jacob Marks, on Flickr As you can see, the cap only has one band. It screws on with the pleasant soft stop peculiar to Sailor. The clip is attached to the cap below the ring, which keeps it from spinning around but looks weird to me. I prefer Montblanc clips: the clip is attached to the ring, and a tab on the inside keeps it from spinning. Nonetheless, this is an effective clip, not too tight and not too loose. 15 Cap overview by Jacob Marks, on Flickr The cap band says “Sailor Japan Founded 1911,” just like current pens. There seems to be some dried adhesive oozing out from behind the band. 16 Cap Band Detail by Jacob Marks, on Flickr The pen fills with a Sailor cartridge/converter system. Though the ink capacity is modest, the pen writes fairly dry and so does not exhaust its supply too quickly. 18 Filling by Jacob Marks, on Flickr Now for the ballpoint. It’s twist action, and looks a lot like the Montblanc 164 Classique ballpoint. The Sailor is smaller, lighter, and compares unfavorably to the 164 in every way except price. However, since the Montblanc is something like eight or nine times the cost of the Sailor, this is to be expected. It takes, of course, a proprietary Sailor refill, which is not readily available at stores in the States. I prefer the Fine black Sailor refill to the Fine black Parker Quinkflow refill that lives in my Jotter Flighter. Sailor’s is smoother and starts up better. 19 Ballpoint Overview by Jacob Marks, on Flickr 20 Ballpoint nib closeup cropped by Jacob Marks, on Flickr The end cap is not perfectly flush with the rest of the cap. It’s slightly smaller in diameter. Weird. The pencil does not share this defect. 21 Ballpoint ridge by Jacob Marks, on Flickr Speaking of the pencil, here it is. The lead advances when you push the top. It’s the same size and weight as the ballpoint. 22 Pencil Overview by Jacob Marks, on Flickr The top screws off to reveal the eraser. 23 Pencil Open by Jacob Marks, on Flickr It writes, of course, like any mechanical pencil should. 24 Pencil Tip Closeup by Jacob Marks, on Flickr Finally, here’s the goal of the venture, a writing sample of the fountain pen. The pencil and ballpoint are, well, a pencil and a ballpoint. 25 Sailor 1911L Writing Sample by Jacob Marks, on Flickr Final thoughts: I really wanted to love this set because I went to some trouble to assemble it, and because I love actually sailing. Unfortunately, when I handle these writing instruments, the words that come into my mind are not “awesome” and “amazing” but rather “acceptable” and “okay.” They are well-made and hard-working, but I want to be wowed, and these just don’t do that. The firm medium nib is useable not exciting, and I can’t use the pen in public without someone asking “Is that a Montblanc?” Answering “Actually it’s a Sailor, a Japanese pen that just happens to look suspiciously like a Montblanc” gets a bit tiresome quickly. Maybe one day I will get one of Sailor’s crazy specialty nibs and change my mind—although the old nib pattern is one of the coolest things about the pen. I hope this review was helpful to anyone considering a vintage Sailor 1911. Your questions and comments are welcome.
  10. I was wondering if anyone out there owned a Sailor 1911 Standard Profit in the "Duke & Federal Blue" edition... I first saw this pen on eBay about 6 months ago and was intrigued to find another translucent blue pen a la Platinum 3776 Chartres blue. I stumbled on it again on Engeika's website, and can't stop wondering about it. The "Duke and Federal Blue" looks to be darker than the Chartres Blue color, and I in both the eBay photos and the ones on engeika.com that I saw, the translucence was only noticeable in the close up photo of the cap, suggesting that perhaps the resin on the Sailor might be thicker. Or maybe it is simply owing to the darker color? Both the 3776 Century Chartres and 1911 Standard are great pens are great pens from the reviews I have read, but if anyone has some insight regarding the 1911 Federal Blue, I would appreciate the help. Thanks in advance.
  11. Sailor 1911 Profit, Fine Nib, Ivory Body I realize there are several reviews of the Sailor 1911 Profit, but I don't seem to see many pictures of the ivory body. I decided to put in my two cents and also have some reference pictures available for anyone else who wants to check out the pen before buying. The pictures I have seen prior to receiving this pen made it difficult to determine whether or not the pen was a bright white or a true ivory. I can happily say that it's a lovely off white colour and that I am very pleased with it. What follows is my picture heavy mini review. I would highly recommend the pen, and it is honestly my favourite pen overall (I had a burgundy one that I have sadly misplaced). The pen came with a standard Sailor box, that seems price appropriate, a converter, two cartridges, and an instruction manual. The pen was a birthday present from my girlfriend, and I appreciate it a lot. She's far too kind to me and indulges my hobby. The Review: Appearance and Design: 8 The classic cigar shape of the pen is fitting, though admittedly uninspired. I very much like the ivory colour and I think it's a step up from white. It looks like a nice warm pen, and the gold trim only adds to the appeal. The clip is also classic and uninspired, but far from ugly. It fits with the pen and all in all it looks very classy. In my book, it does get bonus points for being ivory coloured. If you don't care for the colour as much as I do, I would say the design is a 7, since it's unoriginal but well executed. The Pen DSCF6769 by makey95, on Flickr The Trim DSCF6774 by makey95, on Flickr Construction and Quality: 9 The pen feels very well made, and is very sturdy. The threads where the cap screws on are smooth and rounded, and they never interfere with the grip. There's not a single loose part in the pen, and it seems sturdy enough to take drops while capped. The resin body feels durable, and nothing about the pen seems cheap. The nib and feed are friction fit, and they can easily be pulled out, but they're not loose at all and are a snug fit. Nib and Feed DSCF6777 by makey95, on Flickr Weight and Dimensions: 10 The pen feels like it's made to be posted, and once posted feels perfectly balanced. Unposted, it is a tad too short for my hands, and feels rather light. Capped the pen measures around 5.25" and uncapped it is about 4.625" unposted. Posted, the pen is about 6" long. The diameter of the grip seems to be around .375". It is a medium-light pen, but I can write with it for hours at a time without my hand tiring. Nib and Performance: 10 Honestly this is my favourite modern nib/favourite non-flex nib. I've tried a few flex nibs that come close to being the joy that this one is, but even they pale in comparison. It is honestly one of the most enjoyable writing experiences that I have experienced. For such a fine nib, it is extraordinarily smooth and has almost no feedback, but still enough to let you feel the paper enough to enjoy the ride. The feed does a superb job of keeping up and it never has any hard starts or skips. The nib wrote immediately, even after being left out to take the photographs. The Nib DSCF6783 by makey95, on Flickr The Feed DSCF6775 by makey95, on Flickr Filling System and Maintenance: 7 The pen uses a cartridge converter system, and despite that has great ink flow. The converter does not hold all that much, but it's certainly enough to last several days of note taking. Having a cartridge converter system makes maintenance easy enough, but the friction fit nib and feed makes cleaning out the pen a breeze. Just take it apart, wash it, dry it, and it's quick and easy to move from a black ink to say a light yellow-orange. Normally I would give cartridge converter pens a 5, utterly average, neither good nor bad, but the ease of maintenance warrants a higher grade. Cost and Value: 10 This tends to be highly subjective, but for a pen that I consider to be the best writing experience, with a marvelous fine nib, easy maintenance, and perfect balance, I would say that the $100 that my girlfriend paid for it was reasonable. I would be personally willing to pay the full U.S. price for this pen (with tax, around 180 dollars). Conclusion: Highly recommended, if you couldn't tell. A word of warning, every once in a while I do see a Sailor 1911/Pro Gear or two out of the box (I've worked with a few over the years) with misaligned tines, but that's usually a quick fix. I have never seen a Sailor 1911 Standard that, once aligned, does not write smoothly. The majority of Sailors that I have seen write perfectly out of the box. Writing Sample/First impression review (Muji Notebook) DSCF6787 by makey95, on Flickr Final Words: Thanks for reading, feel free to mention your own thoughts on the pen, the colour, or my pictures. I tried my best to accurately pick up the colour of the body. I cannot thank my girlfriend enough for the gift, and I know it will see a lot of use. The only thing that I'm worried about is staining the ivory body. I've been looking into leather pen slips/holders for this pen, and I would appreciate any cheap but durable recommendations. I would like around 10 dollars, 15 maximum for the holder. I hope the review was informative.
  12. This is my first review in here. Actually, it is my first pen review ever. I have purchased the Sailor Profit Demo pen with the 21k Zoom nib. Why? Sailor because I have read a lot about it and the specific nib because it looked interesting and versatile. As I usually tend towards the medium and the broad nibs I thought it would be good to try the combination of them (and more) in one nib. First impression (9/10) I am usually a fan of classic pens. This means that the transparent pen with the gold trims would not usually be my first choice. Would it not been transparent, It would be a classic pen. My very initial reaction when it was still in the box was not very enthusiastic. However, upon touching and opening the pen and after inking it I have already started liking it. No more than 5 minutes after filling it with ink (Iroshizuku asa-gao) I was in love with the pen. It is a beautiful pen, well balanced, glides over the paper - any paper. It feels good in the hand, despite the fact it is transparent it does not look cheap but rather a quality pen as it should. The gold parts are actually neat, The 21k gold zoom nib is wonderful. what can I say more? Appearance (9/10) I find this pen to be beautiful. The Sailor 1911 Profit is not a small pen. It has a presence and the transparent polymer with the gold combination of the demo pen gives it some kind of grace.The reason for not giving it 10 out of 10 is that IMO it is not as nice when capped or without a cap as it looks when posted. Design/Size/Weight (10/10) As I have already mentioned in my first impression, the design has some twist. The twist comes from the combination of the transparency with the gold trim, clip, rings. Even the converter is a combination of gold and transparency (not when filled of course).When posted, the size and weight of this pen are just right for me. It is not too heavy and not too light. My hand does not get tired from writing a few consequent pages with it. When it is not posted, well, the pen is too light for my needs. But I have always liked writing with a posted pen (otherwise I lose the cap) so that is not an issue at all. If you like your pen to be light, you can hold it non posted. It is big enough to do so. The Nib (11/10) We can agree that the most important part of the pen is the nib - can we?I have read and heard that the Sailor nibs are the best of the best.This pen came with the 21k gold Zoom nib. Indeed it is the best nib I have ever experienced.Maybe I should mention that I do have another Sailor FP with an excellent nib (FM grade) but not as this one!his Zoom nib is just perrrrrrrrrrfect. For me of course...Writes on both sides, soft as butter. Naturally, the broader side is wetter but not necessarily feathery. I write in English and in Hebrew - actually more in Hebrew than in English. That means that I write from right to left and not only from left to right. This nib has no issue with that. None whatsoever. It is soft and smooth and fluent on both sides and in both languages.It seems to write itself. Filling System (10/10) The original Pilot ink converter that comes with the pen is suited for this one. It is a transparent piston converter. You just click it in and twist.As aforementioned, it is transparent with gold and that integrates with the general look of the pen.It does the job very well.I am not sure how long the ink will last between the fillings . This pen is on the wetter side of life and will consume more ink but there is nothing unusual about it. If anything, I will update in the future. Cost and Value (10/10) This Sailor full size pens with the 21k nibs are sold in eBay and Amazone for a range between $180 - $300.For the quality that it provides, and my great satisfaction with it - I think that it is a great value for money.Besides, I have purchased this pen from egaika on eBay - price is relatively low, the lowest I could find and the service is amazing. I will relate to my most positive experience with Mr. Taizo from egaika in the proper forum. Conclusion - Total Rating 9.75/10 Boy, am I glad with this pen. Up to date it is the pen that I like most from my 20somthing FP collection. It is beautiful, classic in shape yet with a twist. The nib is is gorgeous in shape and writing. The pen is well balanced and fun to write with.The pen writes, smooth, soft and of courseit can write in difference widths. So I actually have a few nibs in one.Considering that this is not the cheapest pen in town, it is of great value for money. I would warmly recommend it if you can afford the cost.
  13. Selling used pens from one's collection - is it profitable or loss making? Many people here own quite a few FPs. That's why FPN is called a nuthouse, right? Quite a few will sell some of their pens off to acquire their grail pen or for other reasons. What I'm curious about is, whether they lose money doing so or whether collecting pens, hold on to them for a time, and then selling them is actually making some profit. What kind of experiences regarding this can you share? For a starter, I bought some pens with a good reputation, just to see me selling them shortly after, because I made a wrong decision. The pen was too short/thin for my hand, the NIB not so comfortable for my writing style as expected, too heavy to hold for a long time and so forth. In quite all the cases I sold the pens, I lost some money, the best case being I would come away plus/minus zero. Am I the only one 'wasting' money for his pen addiction or are there serious collectors out there who know what they do and sell when the prices went up for some (rare) pens and such they make $$$? Your thoughts?





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