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  1. I recently got a couple of inks from PurePens, Noodler's Red-Black and J. Herbin Vert de Gris. Also a random ink sample which turned out to be Dominant Industry Royal Azalea (cute pink on it's lighter shades, a bit too much for me on the darker ones). One of the main reasons I had for getting Red-Black was my liking for Oxblood, but wishing it didn't get destroyed by any water droplets (as it already did a few times on my work notes). Here's a slightly not scientific comparison between the two. I'm still experimenting on which types of nibs I like Red-Black the best, but I love it already. The bottles: Comparison sheet (Rhodia 80 g/m²): Red black shows some good resistance to water and bleach since it's at least partially bulletproof. The dry times are long, but that might be because of the nibs I used. The Ahab is very wet even when not flexing, and the Kaweco Sport used is a broad nib. I've seen reviews with lower drying times, so I'll keep an eye out for that as I use this ink more. Both inks look great, but Red-Black has more tone variation and shading, while Oxblood is more homogeneous. Chromatographies: Both inks seem to be formulated in a similar way, having a darker component, a red component, and a yellow. Noodler's red black also has a pink-ish side that shows up along with the red component. When I first inked up a pen with Red-Black, it came out as a bright red, since I had not shaken the bottle and I assume the dark and yellow tones had separated.
  2. yazeh

    Noodler's Polar Purple

    This is a muted , bullet proof purple in the Polar series. Polar series consists of five inks. Black, Brown, Green, Blue and Purple. Comparison: Polar inks were developed for cold regions. In their original iteration they didn’t freeze, but had flow issues, I believe. In this updated version they turn into slush in subzero temperatures. TR 68 gr /Reverse fude #6 While I live in a relatively cold area, I have not found the need to ever use a fountain pen or pen for that matter outdoors. Frankly, I doubt if I can hold a pen in -30°C /-22°F with a gigantic mitt. And frankly I don't see the point of getting frostbite to prove a point. Midori / dry time decreases drastically on this paper, 9 seconds. Nib is medium Polar Blue and Purple are similar in behaviour: they are both very wet, and muted. So, your EF will probably turn in a fine. These i cellulose reactive inks, don’t behave well on cheap/ thin paper, that is they bleed through like there’s no tomorrow. HP 32 Polar Purple doesn’t shade, unless you use a wide nib. It’s a pastel/muted/flat colour. I like pastel. It's not distracting Shading on TR 68 gr/ #6 fude nib - There is shading on this paper. But dry times are above 20s on this paper. Dry time on Rhodia is almost immediate, with Midori is about 10 seconds. Fude nib/ Midori Polar inks have a bad rap in general. They can have some flow issues at time and need the right pen/nib combination. They stain (Green and Brown do) but a bit of Doyou/Red Rattlers and the stain disappears. Thought they are best to be married to one pen and they live happily ever after. I have Green in a Kaweco and brown in Chinese pen. They just do fine. Clairefontaine/ fude Rhodia - Water test. Note the water test was done immediately after writing. · Pens used: Jinaho 450 fude/ medium nib - Reverse · Papers used: TR 68 gr / Midori/ Rhodia/ Clairefontaine /HP32 · Shading: None. Pastel · Ghosting: On thin absorbent paper yes. With pens · Bleed through: on thin papers for sure. · Flow Rate: Wet. · Lubrication: Good · Nib Dry-out: Needs a well-sealed pen. · Start-up: No · Saturation: Muted · Shading Potential: None · Sheen: None · Spread / Feathering / Woolly Line: Not noticed. But I’m sure with thin absorbent paper it would feather and fly! · Nib Creep / “Crud”: Not noticed. · Staining (pen): I don’t know. · Clogging: None · Water resistance: Excellent · Availability: 90 ml bottles There is a strong possibility that this ink might stain plastic convertors.
  3. I love everything about the Triple Tail. The largeness. The clearness. The non-smellyness. The plunger filling system. The 308 cartridges I can use. Everything, that is, but the nib itself. It's just too darn much for me. It's finicky, which is bad enough. But even when it does work after heat setting, etc -- and even with an ink as simple as 4001 Royal Blue or Waterman Serenity Blue -- it's like writing with a paint brush. And that's before flexing! Before I return it for a partial refund, I thought I would see if anyone has managed to trade it out for a #6 nib? And it not a basic #6, then something else? I saw someone asked Goulet, and the answer was: "Maybe". Have you done it? How'd it go?
  4. yazeh

    Noodler's Tsvetayeva

    A rich red, homage to the great Russian poetess, Marina Tsvetayeva. Note Nathan Tardiff uses an alternative spelling for Tsvetaeva. Information gleaned from her biography is from wikipedia and poetry foundation. Note: The selected poems are from a translation by Andrey Kneller on Kindle. I've chosen certain lines and not entire poems. Marina Tsvetayeva was born in Moscow 8 October 1892. Her father was a professor of fine arts, her mother a concert pianist, who wanted her to become a musician and not a poet, as she found her poems insipid. She spend most of her life out of use. Don’t mistake these soulful eyes for meekness. Tsvetayeva’s poetry, reads like punctuated bullet shots: an explosion of emotions, imagery, and sounds. She once famously said, “Next time I will be born not on a planet, but on a comet!” A prophetic poem on Midori/ Ahab Note how the saturated feed lightens Some of her poetry is especially apt in the current situation of war. To love a country that does not love you, to be a stranger in exile and in exile in your own country. That was the lot of Marina Tsvetayeva. Tomoe River She and her family paid for it dearly. Her life was mired with poverty, exile, and tragedy. Tsvetayeva married an army cadet, Sergei Efron, who fought in the World War I and during the Russian revolution joined the white army, and after their defeat in 1920, emigrated to Paris. Stuck in Moscow during the great famine, she left her daughters in the care of orphanage, believing they would be fed better. One of them died from starvation. She emigrated in 1922 to Paris and reunited with her husband. In Paris, she was shunned, by the Russian intelligentsia, especially after she wrote to a Soviet poet. From then on she lived from hand to mouth. TR 68gr Her daughter, Ariadna, espoused communist ideals and left for the Soviet Union in 1937, followed by her husband, Efron, who unbeknownst to Tsvetayeva had become a NKVD spy and was involved in a couple of assassinations of Russian dissidents. HP 32 Ironically both Efron and Ariadna were imprisoned in charges of espionage in 1941. Efron was murdered, and Ariadna spend 16 years in the gulag. This is on Hammermill Printer Paper, Premium Multipurpose Paper 20 lb, 92 brightness.... Tsvetayeva moved back to the Soviet Union in 1939. From then on, she lived in abject poverty and hanged herself in 1941. She was 48. To finish the train wreck of her life, her beloved son, volunteered and was killed in 1944. Now for the ink: I thought I had found my dream bulletproof red. But for some reason this ink, like other Noodler’s red, has difficult to dry and depending on the pen/paper/nib can smudge. For example, with a Jinhao 450, it lays a lot of ink that smudges on Midori 30 minutes later. Ironically with Ahab it behaved in a much different fashion. But still, I won’t recommend it to lefties, or those who write copiously on Japanese papers with wet pens and wide nibs. Ironically on absorbent paper it dries instantly. This is an unrelated text. It is a photo to show off the shading with a fude nib.... Though dry times is atrocious... Paper is Apica Comparison Cleaning is a bit like other red/ pink inks, a pain. Though I have had worse, Skrip Red/ Sailor Grenade and Herbin rose cyclamen. But you definitely need a pen liquid wash. This is one beautiful red, and if it didn’t have the smudge problem, I would been buying a bottle. I suspect that a drop of water might alleviate the smudge problem much like Red-Black. Note Russian series inks are more expensive than standard bulletproof inks. Ink is bulletproof, fluorescent. Note the left side was held under water. I didn't wait 24 hour for the ink to dry completely. The excess ink washed away. • Pens used: Ahab/ Jinhao 450 fude • Shading: delightful with wider nib. • Ghosting: a bit on absorbent paper… • Bleed through: No. • Flow Rate: medium.. • Lubrication: average • Nib Dry-out: No. • Start-up: No • Saturation: Deep rich red • Shading Potential: Yes • Sheen: None • Spread / Feathering / Woolly Line: Not noticed • Nib Creep / “Crud”: it depends. • Staining (pen): you need to rinse it in a pen wash. But surprisingly it was easier to clean that Rose Cyclamen/ Skrip red. • Clogging: None • Water resistance: Excellent • Availability: 90 ml bottles – More expensive than traditional Noodler’s inks.
  5. Hello Fellow FPNers, I have been away from fountain pens for about 10 years after many years using them almost exclusively. Now that I’m back in the fold, I’m wondering if there are any well behaved, beautiful waterproof inks out there I might not know about. I remember that most of the waterproof or bulletproof inks I used (Noodler’s Luxury Blue comes to mind) tended toward nib creep and were very hard to wash out of pens. I’ve recently received a sample of Noodle’rs Zhivago and have been very impressed by its good behavior, lack of nib creep and good flow. But it basically looks black (barely a hint of green) and I’d prefer something in the blue-teal-green spectrum. MUST be a well behaved ink. Thanks for your insights! GNL
  6. Here are 10 blue-black(ish) inks and two “true” blue inks as a comparison. Just for the fun of it. I scanned the sheet and with that most of the inks don’t show their sheen (or it’s not that obvious in the scan) so here are some photos of the inks to showoff some sheen: And for those of you who care about water resistance of inks, here are the inks after 15 seconds water bath:
  7. visvamitra

    Squeteague - Noodler's

    Noodler's is one of the companies that don't need introductions. Nathan's Tardiff work is unimaginable. The guy must be a vampire who doesn't sleep and feeds on developing ideas: new inks, new pens. Squeteague has unusual color and good properties. I'm not sure whether I really like the color. Ink splash Software Id Oxford Recycled 90 g, Kaweco Sport Classic, B
  8. yazeh

    Noodler's House Divided

    A very unusual looking ink, hovering between dull purple and brown/grey/black. It's quite a neutral colour. The writing experience is quite pleasant. Ink is wet and lubricated and fast drying. I won't recommend this ink for a very wet pen, though. Ink is fast drying. There might be ghosting with a wet/ wide nib like most bulletproof nibs. Rinsing is easy. However, the pink/ red component might stick around a bit like most pink/red inks (bulletproof or not) But overall it is much more easier that Sailor Jentle Grenade or Herbin Rose Cyclamen or Sheaffer Skrip red. Ink's title is a cautionary tale of these times of division we live in and is inspired by Sam Houston and Abraham Lincoln, which I "assume" was take from the New Testament. Most writing are done with a Kanwrite Ultra flex, a wet pen. Midori TR 68 gr HP 32 Paper Ink comparaion This text is on TR 68 gr, written with a #6 fude nib (text is from the Song of Songs, translated by Chana and Ariel Bloch) A sketch with an Ef nib... Water test - Left side was under running water....Note how red and blue separate.... Ink wash on MIdori water colour paper
  9. xTurtleToex

    Noodler's American Aristocracy

    Hello , Just wondering if could help with some questions I'm having about the Noodler's American Aristocracy ink. I know there are 3 "flavors" possible, but thats not what I'm thinking about. I bought a few bottles to try in my Kuretake Brush pen. Never made it there for the project I was doing. I journal often and always use waterproof, archival, and, or, bulletproof/eternal inks. I like variety and have many shades of blue and black. I also have a couple greens. Anyways... I was thinking about using this ink to journal, but have never used non bulletproof, waterproof, inks before for this purpose. I know that just because inks may not be water proof/resistant, etc, doesn't mean they won't last a long time. All that to ask my question... Does anyone know if the Noodler's American Aristocracy ink would be an ok choice for Journaling or anything else that would require lasting a long time? Would this ink fade quickly, after just a few years? Is this a ink that UV would destroy? Etc. Etc. I've seen many tests done for inks in the other forums, but haven't seen this ink used for any tests. So, I'm reaching out to see what everyone thinks. I would love to fill up a pen and writing with this ink. I just dont want to use it. And then a few years down the road I open up my journal, or view a document, or project, and the ink is gone, faded, or generally illegible. Appreciate your thoughts.
  10. My first attempt at a pen review. Comments and suggestions for improvement gratefully received. ----- Noodler’s 'Charlie' is a free eyedropper pen that comes with the 4.5 oz size of Noodler’s Heart of Darkness - and now also with FPN Voltaire Candide Vermilion. These are my impressions after using them together for about a month. BACKGROUND The free pen with Heart of Darkness used to be an eyedropper-converted Platinum Preppy. As Nathan Tardif of Noodler’s Ink explains, the Charlie pen is a response to the events in Paris in January 2015 - his way of saying ‘Je suis Charlie’, or at least ‘Ce stylo est Charlie’. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G-FpVSf8udI I missed out on the first batch of 140 Charlies, which sold out quickly. In some ways, being neither a satirical writer nor a cartoonist, I felt unqualified to take up that torch. But as soon as Goulet Pens (no affiliation, happy customer) got a second batch in stock around mid-May, I put in an order. FIRST IMPRESSIONS Charlie is a light, slim pen, similar in size, shape and materials to a Noodler’s Creaper. It feels comfortable and solid. The screw cap (mine is black with muted red-brown streaks that are hard to photograph) is interchangeable with a Creaper cap. Creaper above, Charlie below. The clear barrel, which is perhaps a touch softer than a Creaper’s, has NOODLERS INK CO stamped into one side and CHARLIE on the other. I think the absence of the ‘CHARLIE’ imprint on the barrel identifies a pen from the first production run. Uncapping the pen reveals a black section and a friction-fit steel nib with an ebonite feed and a classic profile. It looks like it might be possible to swap a Creaper nib and feed into the Charlie. Nib and section: Creaper above, Charlie below. Approximate dimensions (ruler and kitchen scale) Length: capped 132 mm, uncapped 118 mm, posted 138 mm Section diameter: 9 mm Inked weight: capped 12 g, uncapped 9 g Size comparison: (top to bottom) Ahab, Creaper, Charlie WRITING EXPERIENCE Before filling I pulled and cleaned the nib and feed to remove any manufacturing residues, as recommended for Noodler’s pens. The internal threads of the barrel are pre-greased. When filled to just below the threads, the barrel holds about 2.5 ml of ink. After filling, the pen wrote on the first touch - no hesitation or skipping. Inked with Heart of Darkness, the smooth non-flex nib produces a fine, wettish, and very black line. Reverse writing yields a finer, drier, but no less black line. It was briefly a hard starter after a couple of days nib-up in a pen cup. Loosening the section a half turn and then tightening it again primed the feed and restored normal flow. Writing sample on Nock index card. CLOSING OBSERVATIONS After a month using Charlie, I have only a few minor issues: - The ink reservoir seems to run down faster than I use it. The same is true of all my Noodler’s pens. Something about the permeability to air of vegetal resin compared to other plastics? - Because the cap posts deeply, any ink in the cap gets on the barrel and then on my hands. (I don't usually post but discovered this when measuring the posted length.) - The cap threads bind slightly, as on other Noodler’s pens. Quibbles aside, I like Charlie very much. I like its looks, the way it writes, and what it stands for. There is something attractive about a straightforward pen with a huge supply of indelible ink. Only the thought of all that ink getting loose in a bag or pocket stops me using it, or any eyedropper, as a carry pen. But that could change. As for Heart of Darkness, I don’t yet know if it will become my standard black. I like it well enough that I shall be using it a lot in Charlie (and other pens) - and not just because I have a lot of it. With many pens, aesthetics, fine materials, heritage - even price - inform the writing experience. Because it is functional, unadorned and free, Noodler’s Charlie removes these from consideration. There is almost nothing to distract from the essential function of putting ink on paper to fix your thoughts for posterity, or until you get to the supermarket. (I say ‘almost nothing’ because any transparent container of ink is quite distracting to me.) Whether you write and draw to advance free speech and great ideas, or for less exalted reasons, Charlie is an enjoyable little pen. Noodler’s Charlie Design: classic, open nib Options: random cap swirls, otherwise none Filling system: eyedropper only Nib: steel Feed: ebonite Body material: vegetal resin Pros free (with 4.5 oz bottle of Heart of Darkness or FPN Voltaire Candide Vermilion) smooth writer large capacity small and light posts securely feels sturdy Cons smells a bit (doesn’t bother me) too small and light for some Hommage à Tardif.
  11. A complex grey belonging to the Russian series, an homage to the great Russian Poet, Boris Pasternak. In its early iteration this ink was purple. Check 2012 reviews of @Sandy1and @mhphoto Pasternak was born in an integrated Jewish Russian family. His father was a painter, his mother a pianist. As a four-year-old, Tolstoy visited their house, to listen Pasternak’s mother play the piano. A young Pasternak by his father Leonid 1910, Courtesy of Wikipedia. In his youth he met Alexander Scriabin, the great Russian composer, and decided to become a musician but after six years of toil he realized he had no talent. So, he abandoned music and studied philosophy in Germany, but to no avail. Thankfully he settled on literature: Poetry and translation Here is a sample of his work (translation used from Poemhunter) on TR 68gr and Midori… While like many Russians artists, he embraced the promise of the revolution, he soon became disillusioned. He survived the great purge. It is said that Stalin had written besides his name: leave alone this cloud dweller. Yet his lover was sent to the gulag and had a miscarriage. Some say he survived maybe, because he translated works of Georgian Literature. Stalin was from Georgia/Russia. The culmination of his work was Dr. Zhivago, his only work of prose, for which and his poetry he was awarded the Nobel prize for literature, which brought him disgrace. He died two years later. He died two years after, is dishonour for having accepted/awarded the Nobel prize (though he rejected it, 6 days after). Dr. Zhivago was published in Russia in 1988. I don’t know why Nathan has settled on grey. I am not familiar enough with Pasternak’s work. However, the complexity of the chroma has convinced that the literary imagery of this genius would demand a cacophony of colour to create a vibrant grey. Now for the ink: This is a dream ink for an occasional sketcher, on good fountain pen paper. The ink is wetter than the other Russian inks, I tried and it would embrace copy paper like a long-lost lover, never to let go. I preferred it most in my medium Jinhao. I enjoyed less with EF/F nibs, though truth be said, I’m not a fan of fine lines in general, unless I’m doodling. With TWSBI Stub, was a bit difficult to control. Though enjoyable to write. Here is an unrelated sketch: Note Russian series inks are more expensive than standard bulletproof inks. Ink is bulletproof. However, excess ink will wash away as you can see on the left image. · Pens used: TWSBI Go STUB – Jinaho 450 fude/ medium nib, No name F/EF nibs. · Shading: Quite a bit on good paper. · Ghosting: No · Bleed through: Yes on copy paper · Flow Rate: Wet · Lubrication: Cushiony · Nib Dry-out: No. · Start-up: No · Saturation: Deep rich grey. Though on absorbent paper it turns into a dull grey. · Shading Potential: Yes · Sheen: None · Spread / Feathering / Woolly Line: Not noticed · Nib Creep / “Crud”: No · Staining (pen): Very easy to clean… · Clogging: None · Water resistance: Excellent · Availability: 90 ml bottles
  12. I work in a regulatory chemistry lab so having basically everything resistant ink is a must for archival & forgery purposes. Where I'm at we're under EPA regulations (vs. ISO or TNI) so it only says indelible ink. The majority of the inks I use are Noodler's bulletproof inks & have been approved by our QA/QC officer. Since Noodler's inks are not ISO or anything else certified I decided to do my own tests with some of our common solvents in the lab in case an auditor ever asks about it. My test wasn't anything super scientific but should be enough to show anyone the permanency of the ink. While I was at it I figured it's nice to share my results with you. The test: I filled a beakers with 6 common solvents we use in our lab. The solvents are Hexane, Acetone, Ethyl Acetate, Methylene Chloride, methyl tert butyl ether(MTBE), and Methanol. I wrote the name of each ink on plain copy paper and let it dry overnight. I then let it soaked each piece of paper in the corresponding solvent for at least 1 minuet. During the soak I agitated the piece of paper several times in an attempt to force the ink to wash off. And for reference I wrote the name of the solvent the paper was placed in with a black Bic pen. After soaking I removed the paper and placed it on the counter to dry. Edit: One other note, the ink labeled Noodler's Teal is a 1:4 mix of Bad Green Gator and Bad Blue Heron respectively. This first picture is of everything before it was soaked in solvent. And please forgive my bad handwriting as I was scribbling the names and wasn't worried about penmanship.
  13. yazeh

    Noodler's Kuprin

    Noodler’s Kuprin Is a rich garnet colour, belonging to the Russian series, an homage to the Russian novelist, Aleksandr Kuprin. The colour, I assume, is a nod to one of his short stories, the Garnet Bracelet, a sentimental story of unrequited love. Chroma Some snippets from the Garnet Bracelet on Midori - Fude nib - Fine nib Kuprin was born in 1870 in the Russian empire and after a stint in the army and many odd jobs, settled on writing short stories, the most famous being the Duel (life of an officer in a dreary garrison in southern Russia), The Pit (vignettes about life in a second tired brothel), and many other short stories. His style is poetic and paints well the end and the obvious demise of the Tzarist Russia. TR 68 gr Apica Medium/ fine nib I found several of his lines describing Jews, a sad reflection of the pogroms. He left before the 1917 revolution to Paris and never achieved his fame again. He returned to Soviet Union, destitute and finished, to great triumph and died a year after, at age 67, in 1938. In contrast to his depressing life, the ink is rich, deep warm burgundy, with delightful. I found the ink non lubricated when I pressed the nib hard but smooth if I wrote with a light touch. Here is a comparison with some other burgundy inks: Ink is definitely waterproof: And here is a whimsical sketch to brighten your day: Note Russian series inks are more expensive than standard bulletproof inks. Ink is bulletproof. • Pens used: Noodler’s Ahab/ Kaweco Perkeo Fine/ Jinhao Medium/fude • Shading: Quite a bit on good paper. • Ghosting: No • Bleed through: Didn’t notice. • Flow Rate: Balanced • Lubrication: Better with soft/ smooth nibs. I would recommend this ink to people who have a soft touch. • Nib Dry-out: Note noticed • Start-up: Not noticed • Saturation: Deep rich burgundy • Shading Potential: Delightful • Sheen: None • Spread / Feathering / Woolly Line: Not noticed • Nib Creep / “Crud”: No • Staining (pen): Very easy to clean… • Clogging: None • Water resistance: Excellent • Availability: 90 ml bottles
  14. Thanks @JungleJim for providing such a delightful ink Just check the chroma: Squeteague is a first nation name for Weakfish, native to the North Eastern Coast of North Amercia. The colour of this ink is inspired by the teals colour of the spots found on its head and back. Photo curtsey of The Rhode Island Party and Charter Boat Association This is a delightful ink for those who enjoy dark teals with shading and who don’t care for very long dry times, or use blotters. Ink has decent water resistance.... a short line and sketch - with a freshly inked pen... text by Leonard Cohen Here you can the contrast with Akkerman SBRE Brown.. Paper Tomoe River 68gr... Text Song of Songs... Translated by Ariel & Chana Bloch Photo • Pens used: Lamy Safari Broad Nib • Shading: Massive • Ghosting: Depending papers • Bleed through: None. • Flow Rate: Excellent • Lubrication: Great • Nib Dry-out: No • Start-up: No • Saturation: Nice and dark • Shading Potential: Yes • Sheen: No • Spread / Feathering / Woolly Line: Not noticed… • Nib Creep / “Crud”: Didn’t notice. • Staining (pen): Easy to clean… • Clogging: Nope • Water resistance: Some • Availability: 90 ml bottles.
  15. Noodler’s Chekhov is Light pastel pink, belonging to the Russian line. One of the most subtle and soft inks I have ever used and one of the best inks, I've ever tried, period. It brings me silent joy. From what I've tried and tested, I really like the Russian Series in General. They are well behaved and easy to clean and water resistant. They have also rekindled my passion for reading poetry. A bit about Anton Chekhov: He was born in 1869 and died at age 44 from tuberculosis. He was a doctor by profession, but is considered one the greatest writers of all times. He once said, "Medicine is my lawful wife, and literature is my mistress." Chekhov was author of four plays, the Sea Gull, Uncle Vanya and 3 Sisters, the Cherry Orchard and many short stories. I assume the ink is a nod to the Cherry Orchard an The ink shades delightfully with broad and flex nibs. It’s a shade that soothes the soul. The ink was slightly less lubricated in my Lamy Safari. It gave just enough feedback to remind me, that I'm writing. Dry time is about 15 seconds. Midori Ahab Lamy Broad/ Reverse The chroma is simple: On Tomoe River - Ahab TR 68gr with Ahab Comparison: Here is a written sample on FIELD NOTES, notebooks. These are non FP friendly notebooks, super absorbent. Front: Back B Note Russian series inks are more expensive than standard bulletproof inks. Ink is bulletproof however, if you drag a wet Q-tip on the ink, it can be removed to a certain extent. However, under running water it looks fine and rubbing alchol doesn't faze it at all. Ink is fluorescent. • Pens used: Noodler’s Ahab/ Lamy Safari Broad • Shading: Quite a bit on good paper with wide nibs. • Ghosting: Not on good paper. Check Field notes. • Bleed through: On absorbent paper with wide nibs. • Flow Rate: Balanced • Lubrication: Good, but it can be slightly dry depending your pen. • Nib Dry-out: No • Start-up: No • Saturation: pastel • Shading Potential: With flex and broad nibs. • Sheen: None • Spread / Feathering / Woolly Line: Not noticed…on FIELD NOTES paper a bit. • Nib Creep / “Crud”: No • Staining (pen): Easy to clean… • Clogging: Nope • Water resistance: Excellent • Availability: 90 ml bottles
  16. yazeh

    Noodler's Esenin

    I’ve been enjoying this eye searing ink for quite a well. In general, most of the Russian Series ink are some of the best “bulletproof” inks I’ve tried, and Esenin is in that category. Sergei Esenin or Yesenin was a Russian Poet. In his young life he married four times. His 2nd wife Zinaida Reich, a famed Russian actress, was killed in 1939 by Soviet Secret service. His 3rd wife was famed American dancer Isadora Duncan. And his fourth wife a granddaughter of Leo Tolstoy. It is said that his last poem, was written with his blood, as he couldn’t find ink in the hotel room, he was staying. Hence this reddish eye searing colour. The next day, he was found dead in his hotel room, having committed suicide at age 30. Some say, he was killed by the soviet secret police and his suicide was staged. Poem (from wikipedia's translation) on Tomeo River 68gr. The pen is Kawrite Ultraflex. The smudge on the word "die" is intentional. The best way to describe his poetry is a quote from Wikipedia: The Empress told me my poems were beautiful, but sad. I replied, the same could be said about Russia as a whole," The ink with a fine nib has an orange red hue, but with the flex it shares more character. Ink is bulletproof and fluorescent. When I first inked, it, I was sketching foxes..... This is with the fine nib of a Kaweco Perkeo Here is another written text: from the Song of Songs.... this time on thin Tomoe River, pen Kanwrite Ultra flex... Savour the richness of the red... and the delicate chroma: In all this is a delightful red ink, for those who are for looking for an unabashed eye searing red Note the Russian series are more expensive than the other bulletproof inks. • Pens used: Kaweco Perkeo Fine/ Kanwrite Flex • Shading: Quite a bit • Ghosting: Not really. • Bleed through: Depends on paper nib/ combination. • Flow Rate: Wet • Lubrication: Great • Nib Dry-out: No • Start-up: No • Saturation: Eye searing… • Shading Potential: With flex and depending on paper • Sheen: None • Spread / Feathering / Woolly Line: Not noticed… • Nib Creep / “Crud”: Yes. • Staining (pen): Easy to clean… • Clogging: Nope • Water resistance: Excellant • Availability: 90 ml bottles
  17. I've been trying to find an ink that would best complement my Pilot Custom 823 Amber <m> both in terms of color aesthetics and usability. I've used Iroshizuku take-sumi (bamboo charcoal black), Tsukushi (horsetail brown), J. Herbin Lie de Thé, Diamine Oxblood, KWZ Honey...and while some were really good (take sumi and Oxblood), others had lovely colors (Lie de Thé and Honey) but didn't write very well. I also sampled a bunch of brown inks ranging from Edelstein's Smoky Quartz (interesting color, but a tad too greyish/green tones for my taste) to Waterman's Absolute Brown (really nice, but looks better on some paper than others). Amongst those samples was Noodler's Kiowa Pecan, which is a lovely warm, caramel color that really matches the body of my Pilot Custom 823 Amber...and so far it writes really well, nice thick, wet lines with wonderful shading on Tomoe River and Leuchtturm paper. Now if I can only make my handwriting as pretty as my pen and ink 😜hah hah. (on Leuchtturm1917 paper) (on Tomoe River Paper)
  18. white_lotus

    Noodler's Kiowa Pecan

    Noodler's isn't a brand that needs an introduction. One of the first of the "new" ink brands, Mr. Nathan Tardiff produces an almost dizzying array of inks, many with specialized applications (non-freezing Polar inks) and unique qualities (bulletproof and security inks) or incredible dye load and saturation (the Baystate colors) as well as regular old good inks. The labels for his inks are equally noted for their wit and creativity, and sometimes you just have to have a bottle of one of his inks just because the label is so cool or outrageous even though you know you'll never use that color. Be that as it may, Kiowa Pecan is a lovely golden brown ink. Many ink brands have a brown ink, but the golden browns are much more rare. Sailor has some in their store-exclusive line, and I'm sure there must be something in the extensive Diamine and DeAtramentis lines, but I'm not so familiar with their inks, which is probably my loss. The ink shades well, dries fairly fast, and is quite water resistant, but not waterproof. On Tomoe River the shading is wonderful. I can only imagine what calligraphic beauty flex nib lovers can create with this ink. No staining on the converter at all but because the ink is mostly waterproof, you do need extra effort to fully clean the feed. Definitely a good ink to have in your repertory if the color is to your fancy. Now my only issue is that the swabs and samples on the web show very different inks. This ink was purchased from Anderson Pens in February of this year. And the color here looks like what I see in their sample and swab. But other online shops show a much darker color and swab. So you may want to check if that's important to you. The usual papers here: Mohawk via Linen=MvL, Tomoe River=TR, Hammermill 28 ln inkjet=Hij. A very unusual mixture of dyes to produce this ink. For those doing ink washes and the like you may get some interesting separations.
  19. Hello all! I am new here, this is my first post. I know there's an "Introductions" section, but I have an ink-related question so I figured I'd keep things neat and contained and just start here, if that's all right with you. (I'll move to Intros if the mods prefer ofc) A short introduction: I'm 22 y/o, from the Netherlands, just finished my bachelor's and currently doing an internship. As such, I have very little money to spend - hence my username! I've always loved fountain pens but for a long time the fountain pen enthusiast world seemed too daunting. Turns out there's nothing daunting to it I own only cheap pens, of course: LAMY Vista (B and EF, the latter being my daily driver), Platinum Carbon Black Desk pen EF, and a clear Pilot Kaküno EF. Can you tell I have a thing for small nibs? Now, my topic: 3 months ago, I ordered some Noodler's Black Eel and Heart of Darkness from an online store in Europe, among some other products. (I don't want to get so specific that someone might guess which store it is.) The other products I received just fine, but they told me the Noodler's inks weren't in stock. I had expected they'd put that on the site before I paid, but alright, they'd deliver it once they had it - they told me 3 weeks tops. After 4 weeks, I contacted them and they told me it was at customs. So I waited. After another 6 weeks I contacted customs myself and found out that the store lied (probably to buy some time): customs in the Netherlands don't hold products like that. I contacted the store again and they apologized profusely, offered to send me an alternative product of my choosing and told me what I already knew: it's one guy making all the inks. They also told me he doesn't have either BE or HoD on hand, he still has to make it. My question: does this story seem at all reasonable/believable to you, based on your experience with Noodler's? Like I said, I know it's one guy making everything by hand. I don't want to push anyone, least of all him, because I know he must have a lot of customers. But I find it hard to believe he doesn't have an ink as common as Heart of Darkness at all in a period of over 12 weeks, especially not for a relatively large European store. What do you guys think? Should I try ordering somewhere else, or just buy another ink (which one?) and expect the HoD somewhere next year? Did something happen to Nathan or is he otherwise engaged? Does this happen more regularly with Noodler's and should I just get used to it? It may sound dumb but I really need these inks. The Black Eel was supposed to be a b'day present for my mother which I bought well on time, but her b'day is less than 5 weeks away now. My daily driver, Vista EF, was inked up with Platinum Carbon Black before and that ink is just disastrous in a Leuchtturm1917 A5 lined journal (feathering, spreading, bleeding), which I used for daily journaling. So I just cleaned out my Vista and waited for HoD, from what I heard a very well-behaved ink. I also intended to start a Bullet Journal in my regular-sized LT1917 which is doable with Platinum, but because of the spread, my Kaküno EF is effectively an F/M, which is too large for the neat writing I'm looking for on a 5x5 grid. Initially I figured I'd wait because it won't take long, and now I wait because I've waited all this time already dangit, but I really miss my (bullet) journaling as a way to improve my mental health. (All this because of some ink, I know, I know, I just underestimated how much I need the journaling). If you'd like to recommend another ink: I'm looking for something blacker than black, well-behaved with low spread, and very preferably something that doesn't budge once dry. (Liquid-y accidents happen in this household and I don't want to lose anything. I also just like the feeling it gives... Everything I put on paper is there to stay. I love that.) I might ask the store for some of Noodler's Black - if they have it... Thank you if you came this far!
  20. Carolartist

    DeAtramentis Dilution Liquid

    Hello I am trying to research permanent and waterproof inks for fountain pens. I am an artist and I am on a quest for the past three years to find the perfect brown to lay OVER watercolor paintings. Not ink first than watercolor. Watercolor first then ink. My goal is to match the hue of the India ink I used in rapidographs Higgins Brown. Yes I know, not to use India ink in fountain pens. Noodler’s Walnut, DeAtramentis Document Brown, Noodlers Black, Platinum Carbon Black are all too dark. I’ve given up and I’m now using Birmingham Pen Co Soft Pretzel because it’s the brown I want - but it’s not lightfast or waterproof. I have to immediately place the finished work in plastic and in a box. Not good to display ever. Questions 1. Will DeAtramentis Dilution ink work to lighten an inks hue? 2. Am I limited to just DeAtrementis Document inks or can I use it on Noodlers, Diamine, Birmingham inks as well? 3. Any advise? samples attached
  21. Noodler's Baystate Blue needs no introduction. I am just a few months into the fountain pen hobby, but even I know that there is no other ink that polarizes the fountain pen community as much as the Baystate Blue (BSB). You either hate it or love it. I bought a bottle of this ink because much of my work happens near water tanks and I needed a waterproof ink for signing documents. But after I ordered the BSB on Amazon, I came to know about another water resistant ink that is made by a part time ink and pen making medical doctor named Sreekumar who lives just 3 hours away from my home. He owns Krishna Inks and Krishna Pens. His waterproof ink is beautifully named as Krishna Lyrebird Water Sapphire Blue. So I got a bottle of that too. I now use BSB in office and Krishna Ink at home for signing the documents. The comparison of both inks, including their resistance to water and bleach, follows. 1. Colour The picture compares Krishna Water Sapphire and Baystate Blue with common inks like Lamy Blue, Sheaffer Blue and Camlin Blue on TNPL 80 GSM Platinum Copier paper. Without question, Baystate Blue is the best colour (in my opinion). In fact the BSB actually jumps out of the paper and my amateur photography skill doesn't do justice to its vibrance. All other colours including Krishna Water Sapphire look dull and boring in comparison. 2. Writing Experience I used two identical Camlin Elegante fine nib fountain pens and Rhodia paper to test the writing experience. Baystate Blue is wetter and and gives more line width. Krishna Ink has less flow but is no less smooth. 3. Drying time I again used identical Camlin Elegante fine nibbed pens on Rhodia paper to determine the drying times. Average drying time for both inks is seen to be about 10 seconds on Rhodia. I repeated this test on TNPL 80 GSM copier paper and the drying time was about 8 seconds for both inks. 4. Water Resistance a) Drip Test I dropped nearly equal amounts of water on the handwritten samples and let the water remain for 30 minutes. Photograph shows the condition after 30 minutes. Both inks showed some top layer run off, but BSB is more water resistant to Krishna Water Sapphire. b) Dip Test I dipped swabs of 5 ink different inks on TNPL copier paper in plain tap water filled tumblers. Before dipping: The next picture is taken just a few minutes after dipping. Lamy, Sheaffer and Camlin inks are no longer in the race. 30 minutes later: Krishna Ink is somewhat water resistant and we can still read the text. Baystate Blue is also not waterproof but clearly more water resistant than the Krishna Ink. 5. Bleach Resistance This was the most interesting of all tests. I used the same ink swabs which had undergone the dip test and poured a few drops of 0.5% w/w Harpic bleaching solution over them. 5 minutes after the exposure to the bleach, Baystate Blue had already started dissolving but Krishna Ink was holding up: 1 hour after exposure: Within an hour, Baystate ink was almost gone and the text was no longer visible. Krishna Water Sapphire was still holding up and the text remained legible. 2 hours after exposure: Part of the text written with Krishna Ink was visible even after 2 hours! Krishna Ink thus won the bleach resistance test. 6. Price (in India) Baystate Blue: INR 4888/- (US$ 66.75) on Amazon for 133 ml (4.5 oz) bottle, after a 75% discount. But you get a beautiful Noodler's Charlie pen for free with the ink. Krishna Water Sapphire: Rs 250/- (US$ 3.41) for 30 ml bottle. The math is left to you. 7. Staining Potential Noodler's Baystate Blue is notorious for staining various surfaces. But I have found it to be a non-issue so far. Bleach can easily remove it. Just be careful not to spill it over something that can't be bleached - like the currency notes, fine leather, costly carpets etc. Krishna Ink stains can be removed with water (and soap, if required) if you notice them immediately. But once the ink dries, those stains can be stubborn due to the water and bleach resistance. Be careful while handling either ink. The Verdict I like both the inks. Both Baystate Blue and Krishna Lyrebird Water Sapphire have character. I use both the inks regularly. So which one to buy? The choice is yours.
  22. yazeh

    Noodler's Pushkin

    Noodler’s Pushkin Agreeable muted green/blue. While it doesn’t capture the flamboyance of one Alexander Pushkin, it encapsulates the Russian spirit complexities and nuances. A bit about Pushkin before touching his namesake, considered the father of modern Russian literature. His great-grandfather was Abram Petrovich Gannibal, kidnapped from “Africa” gifted to Peter the Great, freed, and ennobled. Most of his works are in form poetry. And he was killed in a duel of honor, by his bother-in-law, a French Officer, in a duel at age 37. Now to the ink. I had difficulties reviewing this ink. This is the first Noodler’s which seemed to have flow issues. It absolutely disliked Ahab, especially when flexed. However, when I wrote with a light touch, the pen glided effortlessly. Chroma: However, compared to similar inks, i.e. Akhmatova, General of the Armies the writing experience was uneven to put it diplomatically. I enjoyed it however, in Lamy Safari. Ink even diluted, is waterproof. Here is diluted test: Ink is fluorescent, I would place it between Akhmatova (subtle) and General of the Armies (striking) General of the Armies... Writing samples: On Midori (photo)/ TR 68 gr (scan) Sketch on super absorbent paper (Peter Pauper) Swatches: Pros: Bulletproof/ very easy to clean/ doesn’t stain etc. Cons: Flow, and chemical scent. Note: Like most Russian series, this ink is more expensive than the typical Noodler’s ink. · Pen used: Noodler’s Ahab / Lamy Safari Broad/ Pilot Metro Fine/ Kanwrite Flex · Ghosting: Yes on thin papers like Stalogy · Bleed through: None · Flow Rate: On the dry side, sluggish · Lubrication: adequate · Nib Dry-out: No. · Start-up: Depends · Saturation: Yes · Shading Yes. · Sheen: No · Spread / Feathering / Woolly Line: None · Nib creep: Yes, quite a bit. Though, Lamy has a black nib, so I didn’t see anything. · Staining (pen): None · Clogging: None. · Water resistance: Bulletproof · Availability: Only in 90 ml bottles
  23. yazeh

    Noodler's Akhmatova

    Noodler's Akhmatova Named after the great the Russian poetess, Anna Akhmatova. Famous and beloved before the Revolution hounded after, until death of Stalin. On a trip to Paris, she befriended an unknown and impoverished Modigliani, who drew her several times. She was famous for her signature shawl, even in the height of poverty, she managed to stay regal... The ink harbours a deep melancholy, recalling that of coniferous forests in the deep of winter under a grey day. It reflects well Akhmatova's soul. For the sake of this review, I have cropped pages, to give a hint of the dynamic of this ink and not my musings.... Chroma Comparison: This is one of the best, if not the best eternal ink I have ever tried. The ink is so will lubricated that beckons you not to force the nib but let the pen glide. I could buy this ink for the tactility of it, only. Ink is eternal/ bullet proof/ fluorescent. The shading is best experienced on white and bright paper. Dry time is super fast. Cleaning nothing was left. Water test: On Hilory one of the most absorbent papers I know: On Peter Pauper Paper (Thick absorbent paper) On Hammermill Multipurpose Paper 20 lb On Midori The ink is so smooth that I wrote a whole page with a reverse Lamy broad.... (midori) Tomoe River classic Tomoe River 68 gr (thicker) A couple of sketches... • Pen used: Noodler’s Ahab / Lamy Safari Broad/ Jinhao Medium • Ghosting: None • Bleed through: None. • Flow Rate: Wet • Lubrication: Out of the world. • Nib Dry-out: Needs a well-sealed pen. • Start-up: None • Saturation: Murky and dark. • Shading Yes. • Sheen: No • Spread / Feathering / Woolly Line: None. • Nib Creep / “Crud”: None • Staining (pen): It doesn’t stain. Very easy to clean. • Clogging: Nope • Water resistance: Waterproof/ Eternal/Fluorescent. • Availability: Only in bottle 90 ml bottles.
  24. This collection has been made in an intensive attempt to find the most ideal and complete shades of brown color fountain pen inks over the internet and as long as writing with a medium size fountain pen is what I'm concerned of, the "infinity symbol" on a regular paper is the thing I've considered saving these samples. I've also benchmarked the index card samples for those which were not available in infinity sample. All the top-rated fountain pen inks – even those which are not mentioned here probably for the lack of a quality brown ink – have been taken into account. ~ Here's the list ~ Akkerman Hals Oud Bruin Akkerman SBRE Brown Chesterfield Antique Copper Colorverse #25 String Colorverse Coffee Break Daytone Havana Brown De Atramentis American Whisky Brown Gold De Atramentis Havanna De Atramentis Scottish Whiskey Diamine Ancient Copper Diamine Chocolate Brown Diamine Desert Burst Diamine Golden Brown, Carter's Harvest Brown, Diamine Raw Sienna Diamine Ochre Diamine Terracotta Diamine Tobacco Sunburst Faber Castell Hazelnut Brown J. Herbin Café Des Iles J. Herbin Caroube De Chypre J. Herbin Lie de The J. Herbin Terre d'Ombre KWZ Honey KWZ Iron-gall Aztec Gold KWZ Iron-gall Mandarin (Corrected Version) KWZ Old Gold L'Artisan Pastellier Callifolio Cannelle Leonardo Sepia Classico Monteverde Copper Noir Monteverde Joy Sepia Monteverde Scotch Brown Noodler's Golden Brown Noodler's Kiowa Pecan OMAS Sepia Private Reserve Chocolate Private Reserve Copper Burst Private Reserve Sepia Robert Oster African Gold Robert Oster Antelope Canyon Robert Oster Caffe Crema Robert Oster Gold Antique Robert Oster Toffee Sailor Kobe #22 Shinkaichi Gold Sailor Storia Lion Light Brown Scribo Classico Seppia Standardgraph Maisgelb by @lgsoltek Taccia Tsuchi Golden Wheat Vinta Heritage Brown Vinta La Paz Diplomat Caramel Krishna Bronze Leaf, Krishna Yellow Valley L'Artisan Pastellier Callifolio Anahuac L'Artisan Pastellier Callifolio Itzamna L'Artisan Pastellier Encre Classique Ocre Jaune Maruzen Athena Kinkan PenBBS #135 Beijing PenBBS #269 45th POTUS PenBBS #504 Vernal Equinox Platinum Mix-Free Earth Brown Taccia Ukiyo-e Hokusai Benitsuchi Tono & Lims Kela Nuts Vinta Terracotta Vinta Ochre Note: the absorption of the ink to the paper could vary. Before purchasing any of the inks above be aware some of them are dry while the others are wet. Plus, based on the fountain pen model and paper you use, the colors could look different. Make sure to use fountain pen inks only, otherwise your fountain pen will clog. Stay away from drawing, calligraphy, lawyer, and India inks. They are not designed for the fountain pens. Platinum and Sailor have some pigmented-based inks; avoid them. Take all these into account.
  25. Noodler's Recreant Rhinoceros (RINO) I was attracted to this ink because it is quite a chameleon. I like inks that transform. This one writes from black and then dries to a Green/ Teal, depending paper. The name of this ink is intended to provoke. A marketing gimmick: pity as the ink is complex enough, to stand on its own. But we’re not here, to debate politics, but enjoy the creativity and diversity of inks Just check the chroma: And the water test. Check the back of the paper: I don’t have any ink, to can compare it with. Ink writes a grey black and dries to a variety of colours depending on your paper. Now some visuals on different papers: Midori Stalogy: Classic Tomoe River (Photo) Tomoe River 68gr: Hillroy absorbent Paper (front and back) and Peter Pauper - Thick absorbent Paper: · Pen used: Noodler’s Ahab / Lamy Safari Broad/ Reverse · Ghosting: Possible on cheap/ thin papers. There's ghosting on Stalogy, for ex. but that can be modulated by less pressure or a different nib. · Bleed through: Same as above. · Flow Rate: Wet · Lubrication: Good. · Nib Dry-out: Not noticed. · Start-up: None · Saturation: Complex · Shading Yes. · Sheen: No · Spread / Feathering / Woolly Line: See for yourself · Nib Creep / A bit on Ahab… · Staining (pen): One of the easiest inks to clean. · Clogging: None. · Water resistance: Water resistant. · Availability: Only in bottle 90 ml bottles.





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