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  1. Both my M and EF nibs developed a touching issue that developed into uneven wear at the tine slit. Somehow they get to impinge on one another during prolonged use. I was wondering if it was possible without prior damage. What am I doing wrong? I had to intervene today in the second nib. I got it to write, but now it writes bold and hard starting. It got pretty smooth though, nothing of the old feedback is present - it became smooth as a medium. I would still like it to write as before. I can see the light shine through, but it looks a bit curved in vertical crossection. The tines are perfectly aligned though. Let me show you.
  2. I now own a Kaweco Sport in the three metal choices made by Kaweco: aluminum, brass, and stainless steel. I long for a copper and titanium sport each to join them, but Kaweco seems to make no titanium pens at all and although they make the Liliput in copper, they don’t make a copper Sport. I ordered the MaJohn RS1 as a standin for the titanium Sport, but is there a similar Sport copy that is available from any maker in copper?
  3. Here I present to you all a vintage mid 1950's MAHAG piston filler by Kaweco FOA , thanks to all the vintage Volkswagen fan over at multiple automotive online groups and forums who answer my questions and give info For a bit of History , MAHAG is a major automotive dealer in Germany starting out in 1930's and still around today, after the war they center all theirs on Volkswagen and added Porsche. Just as any other of such they give company branded merchandise to customers and also employees. This pen as far as info and speculation goes ( according to the Volkswagen fans ) was only given to priced customers who purchase up market model like the Karmann Ghia, Porsche or the full option Beetle or the famed 23 windows bus and also likely to distinguished employees. It's actually a rare item accordingly. A fascinating and interesting piece of automotive and fountain pen memorabilia. This pen was OEM manufactured by Kaweco and everything tells , the piston mechanism had the distinctive pin through the knob construction and the whole pen exhibit a variety of the Sport model's character. It had the model 12's piston mechanism but it's got the early post war 112 construction of mix celluloid + ebonite BHR. It had a Bock 14C gold nib that is fine and surprisingly soft and almost full flex. With an all round cap with the MAHAG logo Technicals and restoration info on coming post
  4. Hello, I was just wondering if it’s just me or do you guys have a specific pen for a specific notebook? This ink color for this pen color only? I use my pilot kakunos (M,F,EF) with colors black, gris nuage, diamine grey, respectively, for my midori notebook journal. My kawecosport (BB) in the shade earl grey for midori everyday journal. 2 Kawecosport (EF) using Vinta in the shade perya and ubi for midori and rhodia notes. Kaweco perkeo (M) using smokey grey for random scribbles and midori travel journal. Am I the only one? Lol
  5. How many clones are there of the Kaweco Sport. I would go and buy a Sport, but I have had 'issues' with their nibs & quite honestly i'd like one that takes a normal sized converter that holds the same amount as a regular 'short international' cartridge. There was the Delike Alpha, but I don't think it is made any more.
  6. Spoiler alert; my search for the ideal beginner's pen is over. Well at least for now 😅 This was a pen I got from the proprietor of one of UAE's two pen shops, Pens Corner, at the Pelikan Hub 2019 in Abu Dhabi. Though people consider this as an insanely inexpensive pen, I had to think over it for a while since my pen budget is pretty low and I am not accustomed to pens this size. People who know me well would know that I love oversized pens the most as majority of my pens are Indian oversizes in ebonite. So this pen was really a gamble, but I totally hit the jackpot with this one. Design and Appearance: The Kaweco Sport debuted in 1911 as a pocket pen. The modern iteration has an octagonally faceted cap and a round barrel that ends in a slight conical shape. Both of these are almost equal in length, however, the cap is much wider in diameter. This allows for the cap to post, rendering an otherwise puny pen totally usable. The cap tapers slightly towards the top and has a conical insert on it. It also bears 'Kaweco Sport' on one of its facets. The barrel ends with an edge is ridged. Mine has an aged appearance and I feel adds a nice vintage charm. The section is designed to be concave and is proportionally aesthetic to the body. This pen is not going to win any beauty contest, but that's not the point. This pen is meant to be functional. And functional, it highly is. The pen doesn't come with a clip but you can buy them separately. They are available in two designs, and I got the vintage styled curved clip. This clip is IMHO one of the best looking clips out there. The end is diamond shaped and has a few engravings. The clip attaches with a ring like thing that is also faceted to match the facets on the barrel. The facets on the clip has 'since 1883', the Kaweco logo, and GERMANY engraved on them. I'll be entirely honest here and say that I got the clip only for the looks. The functionality is somewhat limited as the clip tends to come off the cap when you apply more force to clip the pen. I avoid this problem by putting my index finger against the top of the clip and then it clips with no issues. Construction and Quality: This pen is made of a sturdy plastic that I recall reading as ABS. At this price point, you shouldn't really expect any remarkable finishing and this pen certainly shows it was made to fit a price point. The polishing isn't the best, as there were a few visible micro scratches on the barrel that has accumulated even more scratches where the cap posts. I baby all my pens so this hasn't scratched up as heavily as a friend's Ice Sport that he carries around in his pencil pouch along with other things. Filling System: The pen is designed to take both cartridges and converters. But the size means that it can only take some of the mini converters out there and I'm not sure it'll even take a long International cartridge. You can eyedropper fill this pen but it dose have a caveat, that ink seeps in through the section and friction fit nib collar and leaks out through the end of the section. But this does have a fix. Using the cartridge that came along or any empty cartridge as a knockout rod, you can knock out the nib collar and grease it with silicone grease. Now you can safely ED your pen and enjoy the high ink capacity and increased ink flow Nib and Writing Comfort: Here's where the pen doesn't kid you. The nibs on these are stainless steel, from Bock and are engraved with all the things as on the clip, and also the nib width. The feed is plastic. My medium nib came perfectly writing with average wetness and a light feedback. While totally usable as it was, I smoother it a bit and increased the ink flow since I prefer uber smooth nibs with a really wet, almost gushing ink flow. The writing sample is with Camlin Blue. Since it is a pocket pen, the section on it is a bit small for me and feels a bit thin but I also have bear paws for hands 🤷‍♂️ Final Thoughts: This pen is appropriately priced but I really cannot understand why the clip isn't provided and costs as much as it does. I mean there are pens much cheaper that come with sturdy clips. I wouldn't consider this a fair argument though since the pen is meant to be tossed around and not clipped to your pocket, so I'm not complaining. I also get that some people have had terrible experiences with their nibs with dryness and baby's bottom being the most common. But I cannot deny that I love this pen. Much more than the Pilot Metropolitan, Lamy Safari and family, or the TWSBI Eco. In fact, I've got a second one, the Goldspot exclusive turquoise demonstrator that is currently with a friend. Just waiting for this coronashit to die down and normalcy return to this world.
  7. Kaweco Al sport stonewashed EF nib My first review here so please be gentle. I always liked fountain pens and I have been using mine Sheaffer VFM for years. And last summer I was looking at it and decided that my Sheaffer is full of scratches and the pen was loosing bit of posses, so I have decided to upgrade to my first pen to something else. After long lurk around I have found an ideal pen for my needs of note taking which combined durable metal body, portability and options of nibs. The price was bit steeper roughly 76 USD with tax. The pen came in a lovely tin that can serve as a pen case for two writing instruments of Sport line and spare cartridges. The tin contained one stonewashed pen with EF nib and it also contained one proprietary cartridge with blue ink. Packaging 9/10 Now the pen by itself is really sturdy lightweight. The cap looks massive in comparison with the whole pen but when you post it balances the pen nicely. Writing unposted more than few lines is pain as the pen by itself is just too short. I have medium sized hands with thin fingers and the pen fits in the hand just right but compared with my Sheaffer or Pilot CH92 the grip section seems thick but it is comfortable though it is bit short so sometimes the cap threads can get in the way but as they are fine they do not have any sharp edges so there is no danger in holding the pen by the threads. Construction 8/10 The nib performs well it is stiff and on a dry side , it works well with wetter inks, if you let it open for some time the pen is prone for hard starts. Now while the nib says that it is EF the line is little bit thicker then my Sheaffers F line. Writing in reverse hold is impossible with this nib. The nib in short was quite a disappointment. Nib 6/10 This pen is for international short cartridges. With a pen with such a short barrel it is not surprising that Kaweco offers two converters for this pen, squeeze and piston. The squeeze converter just from looks of it just no. The piston looked interesting so I bought it and in short you will do better, if you reuse cartridge with an ink of your choice. The piston converter is small officially holds 0.4 ml of ink. But you cannot fill it fully as the piston is capable to fill barely half of the converter and it won’t fit in the Al sport fully extended so you have to keep the piston to ¾ of its capacity that leaves you with an amount of 0.3ml of ink in converter or you will face leakage. You also cannot convert this pen to an eyedropper because of the metal barrel. Filling system 5/10 All in all this pen is great EDC pen, light and easy to carry around with your notebook, but the nib was bit of a let down I was expecting bit thinner line, but it writes well and the only real complaint I have is the filling system as I do think that Kaweco could make much better job with converters for this pen, but so far this is really cartridge only pen. All in all 7/10 ​(For those curious about the Czech pangram it roughly says: So lets the terrible tones of the devils playing the sinful saxophones fill the hall with waltz, tango and quickstep.) With regards Milan
  8. I recently picked up a Kaweco Sport, which seems to have a slight flow issue (skips and hard starts) when writing normally, but which disappear when reverse writing. Has anybody had any experience with this sort of phenomenon, and what is it likely to indicate is the underlying problem? Does this suggest it is a flow / dryness issue, for example, that could be solved by making the nib a little wetter (writing in reverse obviously produces a finer line which does not need to draw as much ink)? Thanks in advance for any advice from more experienced pen maestros...
  9. antichresis

    Kaweco Barrel Wear

    Hi! I'm in the market for a Kaweco Sport (the Guilloche has been in my mind for some time now..) but I've read that the barrel will show a ring of scratches even with careful regular use--it's an unavoidable eventuality. Can anyone post photos of how bad it will look or how unnoticeable it will be? I don't mind barrel scratching. In fact my old 78G (bought years ago) went through regular rough use: the gold paint has mostly disappeared and the plastic is noticeably duller than a brand new one, but it doesn't look horrible. Will the Kaweco Sport look horrible?
  10. Kaweco ICE Sport Black FP Review Source Kaweco sent me this pen in return for an honest review. The Smokey Grey ink cartridges were included in the box. I’ve been using this pen for over 3 months now, so I think I have given myself plenty of time to get to know it. History (reproduced from the Kaweco web-site) Kaweco - In 1883 the manufacturer of high-quality writing instruments was founded in Heidelberg Germany. Kaweco has been producing a wide range of fine writing pens and has been setting a great value on classy design and high standard manufacturing. The first Kaweco Sport was founded in 1912 as a pocket fountain pen for ladies, officers and sportsmen. In 1930 the brands and models of Kaweco and Aurumia fused and the Ka We Co three part circle emerged. This circle is still used today on nearly all of it’s pens. Even Sepp Herberger already appreciated these characteristics. It was with a Kaweco Sport that the former coach of the German national soccer team wrote on a piece of paper his winning tactics which brought the Germans to the world cup in 1954. In 1993 H & M Gutberlet GmbH made it’s first prototypes for a relaunch of the Kaweco Sport under the name Trekking, but gained and registered the rights to rename as Kaweco in 1994. The Kaweco Sport was newly produced as a cartridge holder in 1995, but the design remained the same as the 1935 model. In 2000 the first Limited Sport edition was produced in green celluloid, and the AL Sport as well as the Art Sport were launched in 2003. Kaweco's product range is perfectly described by the keywords "tradition" and “innovation" Appearance and Design The Kaweco ICE Sport starts off as a small and compact pen until you remove it’s octagonal shaped cap, and replace it on the end of the barrel to make a decent sized fountain pen in your hand. It's one of the very few fountain pens that I use with a posted cap. The ICE Sport range differs from the Skyline and Classic range in having a transparent barrel. It has platinised accents like the Skyline Sport, and comes with a steel nib. I love the very attractive milled edge on the end of the barrel. Kaweco supply a standard steel nib unit, with iridium tip, with this pen, that matches it’s Kaweco platinised plated metal cap emblem as well as the silver coloured ‘Kaweco Sport’ script on the barrel. This pen has a black grip, a transparent barrel and a transparent black cap. You can buy this pen with or without a matching clip that costs extra. It comes in a standard sized Kaweco Sport cardboard box. Construction and quality Although this pen is made from plastic, it feels quite well made and fairly substantial in your hand and performs as well as many full sized pens. It’s lightweight, but doesn’t feel flimsy, and it has a nice size, well shaped grip. The cap is intended to be posted on the barrel for all Sport pens and the pen feels nicely balanced in your hand when the cap is posted on the barrel. As always with Kaweco Sport pens, the cap and the barrel screw together very well for a close fit, on smoothly machined screw threads. Weight and Dimensions Weight: 10grams. Measurements: Closed; 105mm, Posted; 135mm, Nib; 17mm. Nib and Performance The steel nib units for this pen come as a complete front part section, as opposed to the screw in nib and feed units that Kaweco make for their metal Sport pens. So you can swap in any Kaweco ‘Front Part with nib’ into this pen. You can usually buy them from Kaweco stockists. They are available in nib sizes EF /F / M / B / BB. An octagonal clip in chrome to match can be purchased separately. Unusually, I found this pen to be difficult to start and a dry writer when I first fitted the Smokey Grey cartridge. I had to remove the cartridge again, and clean out the pen before reinserting the cartridge and trying again. it performed much better after I had cleaned it out. Maybe there were some remains of machine oil that stopped the flow of ink before I cleaned it out. On my second attempt, I was impressed with the smoothness of the nib, that needed no tip adjustment at all. It gave me a smooth writing experience that rivalled that of some gold nibs in more expensive pens. There is no flex with these steel nibs, but I don’t really mind that. I don’t particularly buy fountain pens because I want a flexible nib. Filling system and Maintenance Kaweco sent me a couple of pens to review, and in with them are two packs of cartridges in two brand new colours. These are Sunrise Orange and Smokey Grey. I selected a Smokey Grey cartridge for the Black ICE Sport. The cartridges are standard International Short cartridge size. If you’re looking for a pen with a sophisticated piston filling system, then you might be disappointed with this pocket-sized pen. Kaweco make two different converters that would fit this pen, the Kaweco Squeeze Converter “Sport” and the Kaweco Mini Converter. However, I only used the Smokey Grey cartridge with it for the purposes of this review. I find that both types of Sport converters generally contain less ink than a cartridge, but either one is useful if you want to use bottled ink. It isn’t a difficult pen to clean out. I just used an ear bulb and pushed some lukewarm water through it to clean out the ink after I had used it. The ink was non staining and it is an attractive addition to the Kaweco range of ink colours for people who like grey inks. I’m not a great fan of grey inks, and found this one a little light for my usual tastes, but I had no performance issues with it. Cost and Value I found the Kaweco ICE Sport pen for sale at Hamilton Pen Company for £17.95 in the UK, but black wasn’t one of the colour options in stock. In the US they are available from JetPens for $25 and Pen Chalet for $27. Seitz-Kreuznach, Germany also sells Kaweco pens at reasonable prices via their web-site, Amazon or ebay Overall Opinion Kaweco Sport pens have a really good screw cap that prevents their cartridges from drying out, and I have always liked that in these pens. I also like the way they are compact pocket sized pens that extend into good size pens that are easy to write with. I'm quite a fan of Kaweco Sport pens and have a small collection of them. So, all in all, I really like this pen and I would recommend it especially if you like ICE transparent pens so that you can see the ink colour through the barrel. Writing sample: Kaweco Smokey Grey ink cartridge From the Kaweco web-site: Pocket fountain pen with steel nib and iridium tip for ink cartridges. Closed version has a length of only 10.5 cm and open version 13.5 cm. Available in the nib sizes EF / F / M / B / BB - with and without clip.
  11. Kaweco Classic Sport Red FP Review Source Kaweco sent me this pen in return for an honest review. The Sunrise Orange ink cartridges were included in the box. History (reproduced from the Kaweco web-site) Kaweco - In 1883 the manufacturer of high-quality writing instruments was founded in Heidelberg Germany. Kaweco has been producing a wide range of fine writing pens and has been setting a great value on classy design and high standard manufacturing. The first Kaweco Sport was founded in 1912 as a pocket fountain pen for ladies, officers and sportsmen. In 1930 the brands and models of Kaweco and Aurumia fused and the Ka We Co three part circle emerged. This circle is still used today on nearly all of it’s pens. Even Sepp Herberger already appreciated these characteristics. It was with a Kaweco Sport that the former coach of the German national soccer team wrote on a piece of paper his winning tactics which brought the Germans to the world cup in 1954. In 1993 H & M Gutberlet GmbH made it’s first prototypes for a relaunch of the Kaweco Sport under the name Trekking, but gained and registered the rights to rename as Kaweco in 1994. The Kaweco Sport was newly produced as a cartridge holder in 1995, but the design remained the same as the 1935 model. In 2000 the first Limited Sport edition was produced in green celluloid, and the AL Sport as well as the Art Sport were launched in 2003. Kaweco's product range is perfectly described by the keywords "tradition" and “innovation" Appearance and Design The Kaweco Classic Sport starts off as a small and compact pen until you remove it’s octagonal shaped cap, and replace it on the end of the barrel to make a decent sized fountain pen in your hand. It's one of the very few fountain pens that I use with a posted cap. The Classic Sport range differs from the Skyline range in having gold plated accents. I usually tend to prefer gold plated to platinised accents, so this suits me very well. I also like the very attractive milled edge on the end of the barrel. Kaweco supply a standard 23kt gold plated steel nib unit, with iridium tip, with this pen, that matches it’s Kaweco gold plated metal cap emblem as well as the gold coloured ‘Kaweco Sport’ script on the barrel. This pen is bright red. You can buy this pen with or without a matching gold plated clip. It comes in a standard sized Kaweco Sport cardboard box. Construction and quality Although this pen is made from plastic, it feels well made and quite substantial in your hand and performs as well as many full sized pens. It’s lightweight, but not at all flimsy, and it has a nice size, well shaped grip. The cap is intended to be posted on the barrel for all Sport pens and the pen feels nicely balanced in your hand when the cap is posted on the barrel. As always with Kaweco Sport pens, the cap and the barrel screw together very well for a close fit, on smoothly machined screw threads. Weight and Dimensions Weight: 10grams. Measurements: Closed; 105mm, Posted; 135mm, Nib; 17mm. Nib and Performance The 23kt gold plated steel nib units for this pen come as a complete section, as opposed to the screw in nib and feed units that Kaweco make for their metal Sport pens. So you can swap any complete nib unit into this pen. You can usually buy them from Kaweco stockists. They are available in nib sizes EF/F/M/B/BB I found this nib wrote after a couple of shakes as soon as I fitted a cartridge. I was really impressed with the smoothness of the nib, that needed no adjustment at all. It gave me a smooth writing experience that rivalled that of some gold nibs in more expensive pens. There is no flex with these steel nibs, but I don’t really mind that. Filling system and Maintenance Kaweco sent me a couple of pens to review, and in with them are two packs of cartridges in two brand new colours. These are Sunrise Orange and Smokey Grey. I selected a Sunrise Orange cartridge for the Red Classic Sport. The cartridges are standard International Short cartridge size. If you’re looking for a pen with a sophisticated piston filling system, then you might be disappointed with this pocket-sized pen. Kaweco make two different converters that would fit this pen, the Kaweco Squeeze converter "Sport" and the Kaweco mini converter. However, I only used the Sunrise Orange cartridge with it for the purposes of this review. I find that both types of Sport converters generally contain less ink than a cartridge, but either one is useful if you want to use bottled ink. It isn’t a difficult pen to clean out. I just used an ear bulb and pushed some lukewarm water through it to clean out the ink after I had used it. The ink was non staining and it is an attractive addition to the Kaweco range of ink colours Cost and Value I found this pen for sale at WeLovePens for £17.99 in the UK. I think thats a reasonable price to pay for this pen. It’s an average online price for the Kaweco Classic or Skyline Sport range. Overall Opinion Kaweco Sport pens have a really good screw cap that prevents their cartridges from drying out, and I have always liked that in these pens. I also like the way they are compact pocket sized pens that extend into good size pens that are easy to write with. If you want a clip or a converter they are available separately, but I find it as easy to refill cartridges from bottled ink with a syringe, as using the converters that are made to fit this pen. I'm quite a fan of Kaweco Sport pens and have a small collection of them. So, all in all, I really like this pen and I would recommend it especially if you like bright red pens to go with your red inks. Writing sample: Kaweco Sunrise Orande Ink (cartridge)
  12. Kaweco Brass Sport FP Review History (reproduced from Kaweco) Kaweco - In 1883 the manufacturer of high-quality writing insturments was founded in Heidelberg Germany. Kaweco has been producing a wide range of fine writing pens and has been setting a great value on classy design and high standard manufacturing. The first Kaweco Sport was founded in 1912 as a pocket fountain pen for ladies, officers and sportsmen. In 1930 the brands and models of Kaweco and Aurumia fused and the Ka We Co three part circle emerged. This circle is still used today on nearly all of it’s pens. Even Sepp Herberger already appreciated these characteristics. It was with a Kaweco Sport that the former coach of the German national soccer team wrote on a piece of paper his winning tactics which brought the Germans to the world cup in 1954. In 1993 H & M Gutberlet GmbH made it’s first prototypes for a relaunch of the Kaweco Sport under the name Trekking, but gained and registered the rights to rename as Kaweco in 1994. The Kaweco Sport was newly produced as a cartridge holder in 1995, but the design remained the same as the 1935 model. In 2000 the first Limited Sport edition was produced in green celluloid, and the AL Sport as well as the Art Sport were launched in 2003. Kaweco's product range is perfectly described by the keywords "tradition" and "innovation" The Pen Measurements: Closed; 108mm, Posted; 129mm, Nib; 17mm. Weight inc cartridge; 44grams. I liked this pen as soon as I first saw it. It feels so substantial in my hand, and is by far the heaviest of the Sport pens that I have tried out so far. In fact it weighs double the weight of the Stonewashed Sport or the AC Sport. The trademark octagonal cap and the round barrel are both solid brass. I have written with this pen a few times now, but haven't noticed any darkening of the brass from how it was when I first received it. My only disappointment was to see that it came with a polished steel nib as standard. I would have matched it with the Classic Sport GP nib, for a closer colour match. However, I asked Kaweco if I could try it with the optional 14t gold nib, and this made it look so much better. Nibs are interchangeable with metal Sport pens, they just screw out. Assuming you are holding the pen in your right hand, hold the nib top and bottom (not sides) and it unscrews out of the section in a clockwise direction using your left hand. This pen comes with nib options EF, F, M, B and BB.I am advised by Kaweco that threaded calligraphy nibs are also available to purchase separately as are Classic Sport GP options, 14ct gold options plus black options. The Filling system As I’m reviewing some Kaweco pens and inks, I selected a Summer Purple cartridge for the Brass Sport FP. The cartridges are International Short cartridge size. If you’re looking for a pen with a sophisticated piston filling system, or even a classic type of twist converter, then you might be disappointed with this pocket-sized pen. There is only room for one International short cartridge due to it’s miniature size. However, I don’t find this a problem at all. The Writing Test After I inked up the pen with the Summer Purple cartridge, it wrote straight away. It was so lovely to write with, not at all tiring, and I didn’t find the grip at all slippery. I found the gold F nib a slightly softer writing feel, like I am used to with most of my pens. Granted this pen feels much heavier than the AL Sport pens and the plastic Sport pens when you're writing, but my hand didn't get tired while writing with it. For flex lovers, there is no flex with either nib though. I'm reviewing the Summer Purple ink separately, so I won't say too much about it here, but suffice it to say I really enjoyed the pen and ink combination. I considered that I might have to try this pen with my Pelikan Edelstein Amber ink for a good colour match as Kaweco don't make an amber or gold ink. Overall Opinion Kaweco Sport pens have a really good screw cap that prevents their cartridges from drying out, and I have always liked that in this type of pen. I also love the fact that the AL & Brass Sport pens come in the Kaweco super metal gift tin that easily takes two pens plus a couple of spare cartridges. If you want a clip or a converter they are available separately, but I find it as easy to refill cartridges from bottled ink with a syringe, as using the tiny squeeze type of converter that is made to fit this pen. Kaweco sell their inks in 30ml bottles or packs of 6 cartridges. All in all, I really like this pen and I would recommend it. The RRP of this pen in the UK is £66 but you can find it at lower prices. The gold nib makes it a more expensive purchase, at an extra £99 or less, but it's worth the extra. Kaweco loaned me this pen and nib to review, and I really appreciate that. Thank you Kaweco.
  13. My transparent Kaweco Sport has some ink in the inner cap and I don't know how to remove it. So I email to Kaweco Customer Service and they sent me this VDO. May be it will useful for anyone else.
  14. When I first saw the Kaweco Sport my inital impression was something along the lines of, 'who would pay so much for something so cheap looking?' I disliked everything about the design and could not see myself paying $25 for a half pint pen made of plastic that doesn't even come with a clip. There was no way that the Kaweco Sport cost much to make, so the $25 price tag struck me as extremely unreasonable. Eventually I began to see the need for a smaller, more portable pen...and of course the Kaweco Sport was one of my few options. That was when I discovered the Ice Sport. The Ice Sport may look less substantial than the Classic or the Skyline, but something about the design really attracted me. The readily available italic nibs made it difficult for me to completely discount the Kaweco as an option, but the design still bugged me. While searching for other viable options the Ice Sport kept creeping into my mind, growing in my brain like a virus. Eventually I broke down and purchased an Ice Sport in green with a 1.1 nib, "nostalgia" clip, and squeeze converter...total cost $44.50 (with free shipping). I had just spent nearly $50 on a pen that a few months ago I wouldn't have thought twice about, all because I needed a small, reliable pen that looked nice and had an italic nib. When the pen arrived I was a little underwhelmed, but I already knew that I was not crazy about the design, the real test would be performance. I switched out the fine nib for the italic, cleaned and dried the pen, popped in the provided Kaweco blue cartridge, and gave it a go. After a week of use I decided that I had made a huge mistake. The pen was a lot lighter than I was used to, the ink flow was inconsistent at best, and even though the squeeze converter worked its performance was less than desirable. I switched feeds (which helped a bit), adjusted the tines, tried various inks...and still ended up with less than desirable results. Eventually something clicked. I don't know if it was an adjustment, letting the pen sit and dry out for a while, or something else, but the pen just began to work properly. After having my Kaweco Ice Sport for more than three months it is now writing like a champ, I have figured out how to best use the squeeze converter, and I have become used to the light weight. Had this been a less expensive pen I might have shelved it and moved on, but thanks to a determination to give this pen as much of a chance as possible I eventually pulled through. Here are my thoughts now that my pen actually works as it should: DESIGN (2/5): I like the compactness and octagonal cap. I love the Nostalgia clip (which I had to buy separately) and chrome cap button, the chrome accents lend a little bit of class to the pen. The screw on cap and slip on posting are excellent design choices. These are all good design points, but they are also where my good feelings toward the design of this pen end. I still think that the pen is ugly (albeit so ugly that it's kind of cool). When capped the pen has more play than I find acceptable, I can easily rock it from side to side in spite of being screwed down. I also really dislike how lightweight the pen is, it just does not feel substantial. The inconsistent ink flow is a big issue that I attribute to poor feed design (after much research I have discovered that I am far from the only person to come to this conclusion). With a slightly longer barrel this pen could have used a better converter, but as it stands the only options are a less than stellar converter, short cartridges, or a less than perfect eyedropper conversion (and I do not trust eyedropper pens). Overall the design flaws just can not be canceled out by the positives. NIB (4/5): Kaweco nibs are made by Bock, they look great and perform beautifully. The nib and feed are friction fit and is easy to change out, which is always a plus in my book. I really like the fine nib, but the italic nib is the one that I use most often. The italic nib is nice and smooth and provides a very crisp line without any issues (when the ink flow is not spotty). My only issue with the nib is that the line tends to be a bit thick and is probably the thickest "1.1" nib that I own. PERFORMANCE (4/5): In spite of the less than stellar design and issues with ink flow, when this pen works properly it works really well. The compact design, crisp nib, and sturdy clip makes this my pen of choice when I am out and about. It does what I need it to do and does not take up much space. Once I got used to the weight I found the pen comfortable to use, even when using it for longer passages. VALUE (2/5): $25 for a half sized plastic pen, really? A converter that is not provided with the pen and normally holds less ink than a short cartridge? AND THE CLIP IS EXTRA? I may have come around to this pen, but I can't say that it is a good value with a straight face. A pen is worth whatever you are willing to pay for it, but just because you are willing to pay the price does not mean that it is a good value. I think that the Sport (even without considering the extra cost of the relatively well priced italic nib) is overpriced. I think that the aluminum version is even more of a price gouge. It took me months of debating and researching before I was willing to shell out for the Ice Sport, and even then I was still pretty hesitant. This is not a value pen, but that is not why most folks buy it and as long as you know what you're getting into then you will not be disappointed. OVERALL (3/5): This is a pen that was hard for me to love. It took quite a lot of adjustment, experimentation, and the pen growing on me in a slow fungus-like manner before I was happy about owning a Kaweco Ice Sport. Had the pen worked well from the get go, I would probably have a higher overall opinion of this pen, but it didn't. I am currently happy with the pen, but the long road that I had to travel to get here was too much for me to be able to give the Kaweco Ice Sport a higher rating. I am certain that this pen cost only a small fraction of its retail price to make and the fact that the clip and converter are extra just adds to this manufacturing cost/profit formula. In the end, I am happy with the pen and gladly to use it on a regular basis, but I am not certain that I would have bought this pen had I known how much it would take for me to like it.
  15. Kaweco Chess Sport Black FP Review History (reproduced from the Kaweco web-site) Kaweco - In 1883 the manufacturer of high-quality writing instruments was founded in Heidelberg Germany. Kaweco has been producing a wide range of fine writing pens and has been setting a great value on classy design and high standard manufacturing. The first Kaweco Sport was founded in 1912 as a pocket fountain pen for ladies, officers and sportsmen. In 1930 the brands and models of Kaweco and Aurumia fused and the Ka We Co three part circle emerged. This circle is still used today on nearly all of it’s pens. Even Sepp Herberger already appreciated these characteristics. It was with a Kaweco Sport that the former coach of the German national soccer team wrote on a piece of paper his winning tactics which brought the Germans to the world cup in 1954. In 1993 H & M Gutberlet GmbH made it’s first prototypes for a relaunch of the Kaweco Sport under the name Trekking, but gained and registered the rights to rename as Kaweco in 1994. The Kaweco Sport was newly produced as a cartridge holder in 1995, but the design remained the same as the 1935 model. In 2000 the first Limited Sport edition was produced in green celluloid, and the AL Sport as well as the Art Sport were launched in 2003. Kaweco's product range is perfectly described by the keywords "tradition" and “innovation" Appearance and Design The Kaweco Classic Sport starts off as a small and compact pen until you remove it’s cap, and replace it on the end of the barrel to make a decent sized fountain pen in your hand. The Classic Sport range differs from the Skyline range in having gold plated accents. The Chess Sport additionally has a chess board design on the faceted cap. I like this very attractive feature on the pen. I also like the very attractive milled edge on the end of the barrel. Kaweco supply a standard 23kt gold plated steel nib unit with this pen, that matches it’s Kaweco gold plated metal cap emblem as well as the gold coloured ‘Kaweco Sport’ script on the barrel. It comes in black or blue plastic finishes. Construction and quality Although this pen is made from plastic, it feels well made and quite substantial in your hand and performs as well as many full sized pens. It’s lightweight, but not at all flimsy, and it has a nice size, well shaped grip. The cap is intended to be posted on the barrel for Sport pens and the pen feels nicely balanced in your hand when the cap is posted on the barrel. As always with Kaweco Sport pens, the cap and the barrel screw together very well for a close fit, on smoothly machined screw threads. Weight and Dimensions Weight: 10grams. Measurements: Closed; 107mm, Posted; 135mm, Nib; 17mm. Nib and Performance The 23kt gold plated steel nib units for this pen come as a complete section, as opposed to the screw in nib and feed units that Kaweco make for metal Sport pens. So you can swap any complete nib unit into this pen. I found this nib wrote straight out of the box as soon as I fitted a cartridge. I was really impressed with the smoothness of the nib, that needed no adjustment at all. It gave me a smooth writing experience that rivalled that of some gold nibs in more expensive pens.There is no flex with these steel nibs, but I don’t mind that. Filling system and Maintenance As I’m reviewing some Kaweco pens and inks, I selected a Pearl Black cartridge for the Chess Sport. The cartridges are International Short cartridge size. I also tried a Kaweco Sport press type converter that I filled with Pearl Black bottled ink If you’re looking for a pen with a sophisticated piston filling system, or even a classic type of twist converter, then you might be disappointed with this pocket-sized pen. The compact converter that Kaweco make for this pen is just like a cartridge except that you squeeze it to draw up ink out of the bottle. It’s less easy, and contains less ink, than using a twist action converter, but the Kaweco twist converter doesn’t fit this pen. It isn’t a difficult pen to clean out. I just used an ear bulb and pushed some lukewarm water through it to clean out the ink after I had used it. Cost and Value I found this pen for sale at Hamilton Pen Company for £19.95 in the UK including free delivery. I think thats a reasonable price to pay for this pen. It’s not much more than the standard Classic Sport, and the chess pattern lifts it from the ordinary especially if you have more than one black Sport pen. Overall Opinion Kaweco Sport pens have a really good screw cap that prevents their cartridges from drying out, and I have always liked that in these pens. I also like the way they are compact pocket sized pens that extend into good size pens that are easy to write with. If you want a clip or a converter they are available separately, but I find it as easy to refill cartridges from bottled ink with a syringe, as using the squeezy converter that is made to fit this pen. All in all, I really like this pen and I would recommend it. Kaweco loaned me this pen to review, and I really appreciate that. Thank you Kaweco.
  16. latetotheparty

    Kaweco Sport

    This is a quick review of a Kaweco Sport that I bought for a Secret Santa gift. So I tested it before wrapping. It's the first and only time I've written with a Kaweco pen. It was around $22 dollars. I chose a fine nib. The body is bordeaux and made of plastic. The paper is Franklin-Christoph's notepad (made from sugar cane). I used J. Herbin Lierre Sauvage, which I think is a nice, leafy green color. The pen wrote straight out of the box and was surprisingly smooth. It is smaller than my Franklin-Christoph pens around the grip section, but it was not so narrow to be uncomfortable. The threads are sharper than on my FCs, but, again, not such an issue as to make it uncomfortable to write. I tried with the pen posted and unposted. It feels too dinky and small to write more than a few sentences unposted. Posted, it is very comfortable. I don't like heavy pens and this is indeed very light. I like the bordeaux color. The plastic feels more fragile than the acrylic of my FCs, but still not so delicate that I'm worried about gripping it. The only downside of the pen so far is that the official converter is useless. It's so tiny that I'm hesitant to squeeze too hard for fear of dislodging it. Other than that, I think it's a great pen for the price, especially considering it's made in Germany where labor costs are not cheap.
  17. I have three pens available to give away in what is effectively three separate PiFs. WHAT? 1. Pilot Prera, F nib, clear with smoky ends 2. Cult Pens by Kaweco, 2B nib, black & shiny metal 3. Kaweco Sport, M nib, ice green finish (with clip) Each pen is small and writes well. The Prera is the largest (least small), and the CultPens the smallest. Reviews of each are readily available. Each pen has been lightly used. Photo: the three pens up for grabs (note that the caption for the Kaweco was not written by the Kaweco Sport: The Kaweco Sport has a standard Medium nib). HOW TO ENTER Respond via this thread, saying which one pen you are entering for. WHAT THE WINNERS GET Each winner will get the pen they have won, without a converter. I will cover the cost of postage to an address of your choice, securely packed but not in the original box. If you want me to send your pen insured and/or tracked, then you will need to pay for that, at cost. ELIGIBILITY Anyone may enter, EXCEPT for those who won something from me in last year's PiF. But you may enter for only one pen. For avoidance of doubt, there are effectively three different competitions, each with a different winner. CONDITION OF ENTRY * If you win a pen, you agree to not sell your prize. If you decide it's not for you, then please give it to someone who will appreciate it. PROCESS This PiF will run until the end of Monday 16 November (as long as you enter by 23:59:59 in your time-zone, you're fine). Thereafter, I will make three random draws and select three winners, announced on this thread. I reserve the right to take some time to make the draw and send the pens off (pressures of work, etc). NOTES * If you have more posts than me on FPN (282 at time of posting this), you're still very welcome to enter the competition; but please do not do so unless it's for a pen that's been on your list for a while. * Note that Cult Pens is a UK-based seller, and the Prera can be quite expensive in Europe - if you are unsure of which to enter for, I suggest you let your physical location guide you. * For the pernickety amongst us: The Prera most recently had blue ink in it, the CultPens, purple, and the Kaweco had green ink. I have cleaned each pen, but traces of ink may remain. Why am I doing this? Two-fold, First, I have received a lot from this forum over the previous year, and I want to give something back. Second, these are all good quality pens, and I'm not using them: they will hopefully make someone else happy (my experiment with small & pocket pens was a complete success: I have a clear answer to my question of whether I would use them).
  18. I was talking to the lady at the University of Auckland bookshop and she told me that they'd have the Kaweco Sport fountain pens, pencil (mechanical not lead holder) and rollerballs in stock within 1-2 weeks. As someone who prefers to purchase locally, this was great news! ~$35 for the roller ball and ~$50 (can't remember if it was 45 or 54) for the fountain pen. It comes with the clip in a metal tin. I don't think I've seen Kawecos at any other brick and mortar store in Auckland. I'm seriously impressed with the stationery range at the university bookshop, especially as far as inks and papers go. I much prefer it to Whitcoulls. Keep in mind that New Zealand has a very limited supply of stationery products compared to other countries. Just thought that I'd let people know, since I found this to be great news!
  19. I've posted about this pen in a couple of threads, and have received some questions about it, so I thought I'd do a full review. I'm a fan of pocket pens. They're handy, easy to carry, and you never find yourself without a pen. I have several modern Kaweco's, and splurged on a Franklin Christoph 40 with Masuyama CI. Still, I've always wanted a piston filling Kaweco. The V12's and V16's are pretty easy to get, but I prefer the older 12G with the open nib. I saw one being sold through an antique vendor on eBay, and took a chance on it. This is what I got: http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/aa163/roomdog/Pens/50s%20Kaweco%20Sport%2011/50sSport009_zpscbb4a6a9.jpg The only thing I was worried about was whether or not the old cork seal had dried or rotted, but the description said it was in working order and there was a picture with it inked. As an aside, they shipped it with ink! and since it didn't leak I knew the cork was good (and that the inner cap wouldn't let it leak in my pocket... Here you can see the piston knob that's hidden by a blind cap: http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/aa163/roomdog/Pens/50s%20Kaweco%20Sport%2011/50sSport003_zps5b359e27.jpg What I didn't pay attention to, and what wasn't in the description, was that this pen isn't a 12, but an 11. Not that big of a deal, and maybe even a little bit of a bonus since it's just a bit smaller than a 12. From the Kaweco History pdf (the pencil is 2nd from the right, and the pen is 3rd): http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/aa163/roomdog/Pens/50s%20Kaweco%20Sport%2011/SportHistory_zps10a6533c.jpg As a bonus, the pencil works too and is full of old (perfect condition) lead... The pen is small, and about as small as I could use to write with. Posted, the end of the barrel rests on the webbing between my thumb and index finger. It's close enough to an unposted M400 so as to make no difference. It's great for jotting notes, and I could easily write a few pages with it. I prefer something more substantial for serious writing though. Here's a size comparison between the 11, a modern Sport, and a Lamy Safari. http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/aa163/roomdog/Pens/50s%20Kaweco%20Sport%2011/50sSport004_zpsffa62a63.jpg http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/aa163/roomdog/Pens/50s%20Kaweco%20Sport%2011/50sSport005_zpsaa399d19.jpg Although the piston sealed well, the nib was a little boogered up. I pulled the nib and feed, aligned the tines, ground the OM to a regular stub, reset the feed and smoothed everything out. I love an ebonite feed, and thought about those workers in the 50's polishing them (it almost looks like plastic). http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/aa163/roomdog/Pens/50s%20Kaweco%20Sport%2011/50sSport001_zpse28cef4e.jpg http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/aa163/roomdog/Pens/50s%20Kaweco%20Sport%2011/50sSport002_zps2d342078.jpg One thing about the feed that puzzled me, was the way it was cut. Sorry I don't have any pictures of when it was disassembled (or a picture of the clear ink window). It is shaped like this: http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/aa163/roomdog/Pens/50s%20Kaweco%20Sport%2011/50sSport007_zps8697f89d.jpg Two ink channels and an enormous air channel? That can only mean one thing... http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/aa163/roomdog/Pens/50s%20Kaweco%20Sport%2011/50sSport008_zps9bf8f91b.jpg It's not a full-flex, but it's a little more than "semi" flex. The problem is that the length of the pen and the pressure of the posted cap don't lend to exerting pressure on the nib to flex it. Still nice to know it's there if you want to use it... Otherwise, the pen is a joy to write with. It is buttery smooth, has perfectly controlled ink delivery (not to dry and not too wet), and offers some line variation from the stub alone. It writes as well as any pen I own, and better than a lot of them. Again, it's a joyous experience. http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/aa163/roomdog/Pens/50s%20Kaweco%20Sport%2011/50sSport006_zps535c133c.jpg Thanks for reading!
  20. Hi guys, I want help in buying Kaweco sport fp. I am from mumbai and here no shops sell kaweco brand fps. I tried online but they also dont sell it. Please help me guys to buy this amazing fp. Thanks in advance.
  21. Hi everybody, I'm new here so I am not very sure whether I've placed this topic correctly. I hope I have, if not, please accept my apologies. Here goes the question: Would you choose a Kaweco Sport or a Hero 200? Provided (obviously) you have at least tried both. Both pens are pretty cheap (I know Jinhaos and Some Noodler's are cheaper). I've heard good things about both and I want to try some gold (or gold plate). Thanks a lot in advance for your attention. Cheers
  22. Hello, I am seriously thinking of adding a Kaweco Sport xf to my stash of pens, and I had a concern about the fact that you can only use a cartridge with it (the little bladder they sell seems no improvement to me). I have recently discovered the joys of using a converter in my various pens (piston/slider, not the bladder type), and found that the usual problems of skipping, ink drying out, or the ink coming out too fast at times, and otherwise inconsistent performance when half full or less, are greatly reduced, seem to be mostly a thing of the past. My question is whether the Kaweco Sport suffers from the same cartridge issues as other brands, as described above, I do realize there is some variation in how bad it can get from pen to pen. Even the bladders on my Hero 329 and Pilot 78g don't seem to hold a candle to what happens when you can push the extra air out of the pen with a converter (if I could, I would replace the bladder on my Hero 329 pens with a converter, in all 4 of them!). Hopefully my question is not as clear as mud. Any and all personal opinions and observations appreciated.
  23. I have a Kaweco Sport and a Kaweco AL Sport, and I'd like to put italic replacement nibs on both of them. Is that going to work? I think I read somewhere that the replacement italic nibs cannot be put into an AL Sport. I notice that the Kaweco replacement nibs come with a section. Can you take the feed and nib out of this section and put them into the section that comes with your pen? How do you do that? Thanks David.
  24. Hello FPN!! I've had my eye on two pens for quite a while and have finally decided to go ahead with a purchase. My problem is my budget restricts me to only be able to buy one of these for now. I have to choose between The Kaweco Sport Classic and the Lamy Safari in matte black, both with fine nibs. Which one would your'l suggest I get because I really cant put my finger on which one I seem to like more. Im looking for a smooth writing, everyday pen. I may also later on want to fiddle around and fit it with a stub nib. Im hoping your'l can help me make a better decision Thanks in advance





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