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  1. Members - and little kids alike - love invisible inks and secret messages. I have a huge fondness for Noodler's Ghost Blue. After years of using different inks (I have now sampled more than a thousand unique inks), I was looking for my doodle with Noodler's Proctor's Ledge, so I had my notebook and a strong UV light. Much to my surprise, I found a whole lot of inks fluoresce. So, here is where we can show some pictures. It doesn't matter if the ink was advertised as UV reactive ink - just show us what it is all about. This thread is not for full blown reviews, just show us the ink under blacklight (or blue light, uv-a, ultraviolet light, filtered light, mercury vapor, LEDs ... you get the idea). Here is the first sample, Vintage Sheaffer Permanent Red. This ink was said to fluoresce AFTER someone tried to tamper with it. The middle ghost is untampered and the side ghosts have water washes. http://www.sheismylawyer.com/2017_2_Ink/12-December/slides/2017-12-28_UV_05.jpeg
  2. yazeh

    Noodler's Tsvetayeva

    A rich red, homage to the great Russian poetess, Marina Tsvetayeva. Note Nathan Tardiff uses an alternative spelling for Tsvetaeva. Information gleaned from her biography is from wikipedia and poetry foundation. Note: The selected poems are from a translation by Andrey Kneller on Kindle. I've chosen certain lines and not entire poems. Marina Tsvetayeva was born in Moscow 8 October 1892. Her father was a professor of fine arts, her mother a concert pianist, who wanted her to become a musician and not a poet, as she found her poems insipid. She spend most of her life out of use. Don’t mistake these soulful eyes for meekness. Tsvetayeva’s poetry, reads like punctuated bullet shots: an explosion of emotions, imagery, and sounds. She once famously said, “Next time I will be born not on a planet, but on a comet!” A prophetic poem on Midori/ Ahab Note how the saturated feed lightens Some of her poetry is especially apt in the current situation of war. To love a country that does not love you, to be a stranger in exile and in exile in your own country. That was the lot of Marina Tsvetayeva. Tomoe River She and her family paid for it dearly. Her life was mired with poverty, exile, and tragedy. Tsvetayeva married an army cadet, Sergei Efron, who fought in the World War I and during the Russian revolution joined the white army, and after their defeat in 1920, emigrated to Paris. Stuck in Moscow during the great famine, she left her daughters in the care of orphanage, believing they would be fed better. One of them died from starvation. She emigrated in 1922 to Paris and reunited with her husband. In Paris, she was shunned, by the Russian intelligentsia, especially after she wrote to a Soviet poet. From then on she lived from hand to mouth. TR 68gr Her daughter, Ariadna, espoused communist ideals and left for the Soviet Union in 1937, followed by her husband, Efron, who unbeknownst to Tsvetayeva had become a NKVD spy and was involved in a couple of assassinations of Russian dissidents. HP 32 Ironically both Efron and Ariadna were imprisoned in charges of espionage in 1941. Efron was murdered, and Ariadna spend 16 years in the gulag. This is on Hammermill Printer Paper, Premium Multipurpose Paper 20 lb, 92 brightness.... Tsvetayeva moved back to the Soviet Union in 1939. From then on, she lived in abject poverty and hanged herself in 1941. She was 48. To finish the train wreck of her life, her beloved son, volunteered and was killed in 1944. Now for the ink: I thought I had found my dream bulletproof red. But for some reason this ink, like other Noodler’s red, has difficult to dry and depending on the pen/paper/nib can smudge. For example, with a Jinhao 450, it lays a lot of ink that smudges on Midori 30 minutes later. Ironically with Ahab it behaved in a much different fashion. But still, I won’t recommend it to lefties, or those who write copiously on Japanese papers with wet pens and wide nibs. Ironically on absorbent paper it dries instantly. This is an unrelated text. It is a photo to show off the shading with a fude nib.... Though dry times is atrocious... Paper is Apica Comparison Cleaning is a bit like other red/ pink inks, a pain. Though I have had worse, Skrip Red/ Sailor Grenade and Herbin rose cyclamen. But you definitely need a pen liquid wash. This is one beautiful red, and if it didn’t have the smudge problem, I would been buying a bottle. I suspect that a drop of water might alleviate the smudge problem much like Red-Black. Note Russian series inks are more expensive than standard bulletproof inks. Ink is bulletproof, fluorescent. Note the left side was held under water. I didn't wait 24 hour for the ink to dry completely. The excess ink washed away. • Pens used: Ahab/ Jinhao 450 fude • Shading: delightful with wider nib. • Ghosting: a bit on absorbent paper… • Bleed through: No. • Flow Rate: medium.. • Lubrication: average • Nib Dry-out: No. • Start-up: No • Saturation: Deep rich red • Shading Potential: Yes • Sheen: None • Spread / Feathering / Woolly Line: Not noticed • Nib Creep / “Crud”: it depends. • Staining (pen): you need to rinse it in a pen wash. But surprisingly it was easier to clean that Rose Cyclamen/ Skrip red. • Clogging: None • Water resistance: Excellent • Availability: 90 ml bottles – More expensive than traditional Noodler’s inks.
  3. yazeh

    Noodler's Esenin

    I’ve been enjoying this eye searing ink for quite a well. In general, most of the Russian Series ink are some of the best “bulletproof” inks I’ve tried, and Esenin is in that category. Sergei Esenin or Yesenin was a Russian Poet. In his young life he married four times. His 2nd wife Zinaida Reich, a famed Russian actress, was killed in 1939 by Soviet Secret service. His 3rd wife was famed American dancer Isadora Duncan. And his fourth wife a granddaughter of Leo Tolstoy. It is said that his last poem, was written with his blood, as he couldn’t find ink in the hotel room, he was staying. Hence this reddish eye searing colour. The next day, he was found dead in his hotel room, having committed suicide at age 30. Some say, he was killed by the soviet secret police and his suicide was staged. Poem (from wikipedia's translation) on Tomeo River 68gr. The pen is Kawrite Ultraflex. The smudge on the word "die" is intentional. The best way to describe his poetry is a quote from Wikipedia: The Empress told me my poems were beautiful, but sad. I replied, the same could be said about Russia as a whole," The ink with a fine nib has an orange red hue, but with the flex it shares more character. Ink is bulletproof and fluorescent. When I first inked, it, I was sketching foxes..... This is with the fine nib of a Kaweco Perkeo Here is another written text: from the Song of Songs.... this time on thin Tomoe River, pen Kanwrite Ultra flex... Savour the richness of the red... and the delicate chroma: In all this is a delightful red ink, for those who are for looking for an unabashed eye searing red Note the Russian series are more expensive than the other bulletproof inks. • Pens used: Kaweco Perkeo Fine/ Kanwrite Flex • Shading: Quite a bit • Ghosting: Not really. • Bleed through: Depends on paper nib/ combination. • Flow Rate: Wet • Lubrication: Great • Nib Dry-out: No • Start-up: No • Saturation: Eye searing… • Shading Potential: With flex and depending on paper • Sheen: None • Spread / Feathering / Woolly Line: Not noticed… • Nib Creep / “Crud”: Yes. • Staining (pen): Easy to clean… • Clogging: Nope • Water resistance: Excellant • Availability: 90 ml bottles
  4. yazeh

    Noodler's Pushkin

    Noodler’s Pushkin Agreeable muted green/blue. While it doesn’t capture the flamboyance of one Alexander Pushkin, it encapsulates the Russian spirit complexities and nuances. A bit about Pushkin before touching his namesake, considered the father of modern Russian literature. His great-grandfather was Abram Petrovich Gannibal, kidnapped from “Africa” gifted to Peter the Great, freed, and ennobled. Most of his works are in form poetry. And he was killed in a duel of honor, by his bother-in-law, a French Officer, in a duel at age 37. Now to the ink. I had difficulties reviewing this ink. This is the first Noodler’s which seemed to have flow issues. It absolutely disliked Ahab, especially when flexed. However, when I wrote with a light touch, the pen glided effortlessly. Chroma: However, compared to similar inks, i.e. Akhmatova, General of the Armies the writing experience was uneven to put it diplomatically. I enjoyed it however, in Lamy Safari. Ink even diluted, is waterproof. Here is diluted test: Ink is fluorescent, I would place it between Akhmatova (subtle) and General of the Armies (striking) General of the Armies... Writing samples: On Midori (photo)/ TR 68 gr (scan) Sketch on super absorbent paper (Peter Pauper) Swatches: Pros: Bulletproof/ very easy to clean/ doesn’t stain etc. Cons: Flow, and chemical scent. Note: Like most Russian series, this ink is more expensive than the typical Noodler’s ink. · Pen used: Noodler’s Ahab / Lamy Safari Broad/ Pilot Metro Fine/ Kanwrite Flex · Ghosting: Yes on thin papers like Stalogy · Bleed through: None · Flow Rate: On the dry side, sluggish · Lubrication: adequate · Nib Dry-out: No. · Start-up: Depends · Saturation: Yes · Shading Yes. · Sheen: No · Spread / Feathering / Woolly Line: None · Nib creep: Yes, quite a bit. Though, Lamy has a black nib, so I didn’t see anything. · Staining (pen): None · Clogging: None. · Water resistance: Bulletproof · Availability: Only in 90 ml bottles
  5. yazeh

    Noodler's Akhmatova

    Noodler's Akhmatova Named after the great the Russian poetess, Anna Akhmatova. Famous and beloved before the Revolution hounded after, until death of Stalin. On a trip to Paris, she befriended an unknown and impoverished Modigliani, who drew her several times. She was famous for her signature shawl, even in the height of poverty, she managed to stay regal... The ink harbours a deep melancholy, recalling that of coniferous forests in the deep of winter under a grey day. It reflects well Akhmatova's soul. For the sake of this review, I have cropped pages, to give a hint of the dynamic of this ink and not my musings.... Chroma Comparison: This is one of the best, if not the best eternal ink I have ever tried. The ink is so will lubricated that beckons you not to force the nib but let the pen glide. I could buy this ink for the tactility of it, only. Ink is eternal/ bullet proof/ fluorescent. The shading is best experienced on white and bright paper. Dry time is super fast. Cleaning nothing was left. Water test: On Hilory one of the most absorbent papers I know: On Peter Pauper Paper (Thick absorbent paper) On Hammermill Multipurpose Paper 20 lb On Midori The ink is so smooth that I wrote a whole page with a reverse Lamy broad.... (midori) Tomoe River classic Tomoe River 68 gr (thicker) A couple of sketches... • Pen used: Noodler’s Ahab / Lamy Safari Broad/ Jinhao Medium • Ghosting: None • Bleed through: None. • Flow Rate: Wet • Lubrication: Out of the world. • Nib Dry-out: Needs a well-sealed pen. • Start-up: None • Saturation: Murky and dark. • Shading Yes. • Sheen: No • Spread / Feathering / Woolly Line: None. • Nib Creep / “Crud”: None • Staining (pen): It doesn’t stain. Very easy to clean. • Clogging: Nope • Water resistance: Waterproof/ Eternal/Fluorescent. • Availability: Only in bottle 90 ml bottles.
  6. I placed an order for a bottle of Noodler's Blue Ghost back in March, when I saw it was offered at a good price. However, the retailer was unable to fulfil the order right away (and that's understandable), and when their order of inks came in from the US a month later but there was no Blue Ghost in sight, that was the last update I got, even though I told the staff there I still wanted a bottle of ink and wasn't letting them off the hook so readily. Then, I saw this other invisible ink in 18ml bottles on eBay, with no brand name or detail -- including whether it's safe for fountain pen use, much less whether it's "bulletproof" -- for just a few dollars and came with a tiny UV torch, I bought one just for the hell of it, even though the per-millilitre unit price is 220% of that of the Noodler's ink. However, since then I was able to order a bottle of Blue Ghost sold and delivered by Amazon US for a reasonable price, so I had confidence it was actually in stock. That order was delivered yesterday. (I have since cancelled my original order from the first retailer and got it refunded.) I wonder how many of us here would bother with getting two different invisible inks, even though we wouldn't blink an eye about ordering the sixteenth "different" shade of blue, or even coloured two inks that are supposed to dopplegangers of each other? Anyway, so here they are: Both are equally invisible on the page under normal lighting conditions, of course. Once dried, you can write on top of it with coloured inks, with minimal interference (feathering, etc.) and certainly not every place where two ink tracks cross, but there is nevertheless some with either of the invisible inks if you look closely. Neither of the inks are what I'd call waterproof (but they are fairly water resistant), which I guess precludes them from being "bulletproof". This is what they look like after a two-hour soak: Even though the Wing Sung 3008 into which I filled the Turritopsis ink has an EF nib, and the Sailor Profit Junior that holds the Blue Ghost ink has a MF nib, I don't expect the difference in the line widths to be substantial. What I'm finding, though, is that Blue Ghost has more of a tendency to spread once laid on the page. The paper in the Maruman m.memo DMP-A7 notepad I used there is not apt to be absorbent, and I was careful to cover the rest of the page with a paper napkin while I wrote, so as not to compromise the paper coating. (I can see from the washed out writing how fine or broad the contact surface from the nibs are. (Yes, I can test them properly against each other with a different ink, or even swapping the inks around in the pens, but right now I don't feel like cleaning them and flushing ink down the drain.) Between the lack of evidence to support the claim of being "bulletproof" (but I really should look up if there is any word definition and test procedure published by Noodler's), and the tendency for the lines to be broader than they need to be because of the spreading, I must say that the Blue Ghost ink has disappointed me, if so no-name ink (actually, there is one in 3-point Flyspeck on one side of the bottle label: Tramol) from China proves equally as water-resistant but seems to work better. Now, of course I don't actually trust or assume the Turritopsis ink to be perfectly fountain pen safe, so I'm not going to put it in a $200+ gold-nibbed pen, but then I'm not inclined to do so with Blue Ghost (or Noodler's inks in general) either; a Sailor Profit Junior which cost me twenty-odd bucks to acquire is about as much as I care to risk on a lark. Still, writing with invisible ink is fun, and more fun (and much easier!) when my order of UV bulbs for my desk lamp comes in. I can't wait to show the young'uns at the next Christmas family gathering, and I've already put in an order for some non-fountain pens that also dispense invisible, fluorescent-under-UV-light ink to give them -- and a couple of big UV torches for their parents; I'm sure they'll need those.





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