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  1. Thought I'd create a reference thread on ST Dupont Montparnasse & Chairman model fountain pens. Think these unique design and high quality pens deserve a post about them. Hopefully, most will agree...... Like with some other similar threads (example, see Delta pen reference threads...), would like this to be a 'reference thread'. By that I mean to keep the thread less of a conversational or 'pen review' thread and mostly a listing of descriptive information about the pens. So, would ask to avoid posting subjective or judgmental info that would be in a typical discussion post or pen review. Hope this makes sense.... Hopefully, the moderator will make this a sticky thread as it should be a useful reference guide to these pens over time. If you have a variation of these pens, like a finish or pattern that I don't have, please add a post with your pen (a few photos and short description would be good...). So, here we go...... I've now amassed 6 Montparnasse (including one LE pen) and 3 Chairman model ST Dupont pens. So, most of the pens in this series. All of the pens I have are in the Large size. There is a smaller size available. Smaller size is a tad bit shorter and narrower diameter, otherwise basically the same pen. Here's some group photos of the pens; capped and uncapped. From left to right in photo: 1. Montparnasse Black 2. Montparnasse Blue 3. Montparnasse Green 4. Chairman Grenat Green 5. Chairman Grenat Red 6. Chairman Ambre (Amber) 7. Montparnasse Ecaille (often called marbled brown or tortoiseshell, thanks jar for correct name) 8. Montparnasse Silver Godron (lined pattern) 9. Montparnasse Silver Mozart LE General Info Approximate Dimensions (Large Size Pens) Length - Pen Capped: 13.8 cm (5.5") Barrel Diameter - Wide point (near start of gold section ring): 12.5 mm (0.5") Barrel Diameter - Narrow point at end of barrel: Only about (1/32") narrower diameter Length - Uncapped (from end to tip of nib): 12.4 cm (4-15/16") Length - Uncapped (from end to end of section at nib: 10.4 cm (4.125") Length Cap: 4.7 cm (1-7/8") Diameter Cap - Wide point: 15 mm (0.625") Nib Imprint: 18ct 750 with cursive 'D' in middle Will add a separate post for each series of pen, with info and photos soon, so, that you have a better idea of what each one is like. Hope you find this interesting and useful. If so, I might do another reference thread on the great Olympio model pens of which there are many versions. Again, please try to keep this thread free from miscellaneous comments or subjective opinions. We can do that either on another thread here or in the Pen Review forum section. By doing it this way, it will help make this a useful reference source on these pens as you won't have to wade through lots of posts to find the info about these pens. Hope this is clear and makes sense. Thanks for looking. Feel free to PM me with any questions or concerns about this approach, etc.... Mark
  2. Sorry for my ignorance about ST Dupont pens and that this pen is not a fountain pen but a rollerball. I am being offered this pen at a low price, which is not uncommon for legitimate pens here in Thailand. Yes, it is in somewhat rough shape but the price is low enough that I think it is still worth considering. The book is available but no box. One reason I am concerned that it may be fake is because I have not found another with a similar laque de chine finish anywhere on the web. So, do you think it is fake? Any information you can provide about model, date, or any other interesting info is also appreciated. (sorry for poor image quality)
  3. northstar

    St Dupont Fidelio Sterling Cap

    Hello everyone, I just bought this St Dupont Fidelio Sterling Silver cap FP BP set
  4. Hello everyone! I recently got two Porte Plume from S.T. Dupont. I am very pleased with them. Beautiful and consummate writer! I've searched this forum and the internet for information on this fountain pen series and I'm surprised at how little information there is about it. I have a couple of questions. 1. Is it really called "Porte Plume"? In Japan, it is called so, but at auctions or such, it is sometimes sold under different names. 2. There used to be 10 types of Porte Plume sold in Japan: Line Silver, Line Gold, Silver & Gold, Black Lacquer, Navy Lacquer, Ecaille, Flame, Tiger Eye, Ocean, Nebula(?) (aka Sei-un in Japan). I think what I got are Ocean and Flame. But I have also seen white Egg Shell and Orange Golddust(?) in photos. How many kinds were there actually? 3. Which company actually made nibs? I heard nibs for the original Classique were made by Pelikan. My wild guess is they were made by Waterman, but not sure. I hope someone knowledgeable enlighten me. Thanks in advance!
  5. Hello Everybody, Just wanted to make a quick announcement for a show coming up. The official Dallas Pen Show 2020 was cancelled, but we have decided the show must go on! The show will not be quite like the normal show due to Covid. We are taking many precautions in relation to this. The show will be in the same location as normal at the Doubletree by Hilton near the galleria in Dallas. It is in the same two ballrooms. Due to Covid the number of tables are greatly reduced, and meet all CDC guidelines and social distancing procedures. Hand sanitizer will be placed all around the show in addition to face coverings being required. We will have face shields available at no charge at the door. There will also be restrictions in place as far as number of people allowed in the show, so a line could form. We want to make this show as fun as possible, but we are doing everything we can to make it a safe show for all vendors and attendees. I hope everybody is as excited for the show as we are, and we hope to see you there! The event is Friday September 25th from 12pm-7pm, and Saturday September 26th from 10am-5pm! Flyer attached with all of our exciting vendors that will be in attendance! Hotel Address 4099 Valley View Ln, Dallas, TX 75244
  6. I am one of the DuPont fans. My pens to date have been D-line, Orpheo, Fidelio, neo-classique. I have just acquired my first Montparnasse, a new old stock LE Rendez-vous Sun. A truly stunning piece of art! I would now like to add another and have been looking at ebay. The size issue confuses me. I know that these pens came in a large size and smaller. On ebay, some pens are designated M1, M2, large, or XL. Is it possible to tell the large size from a photo without having dimension data? I have looked at the reference pages on this site but I could find no information about the various M1, M2, etc designations. Any information would be greatly appreciated! Thanks!
  7. Babangita

    St Dupont Nib Sections

    I have several St Dupont pens and they all write perfectly. As it often happens, some are more favorites than others. On one of my favorite ones, I accidentally damaged the metal section. It is more of a visual thing than a functionality problem, the nib is still good. Is there any way possible to dismantle an Olympio/D-Line metal nib section for nib swapping and cleaning? It might seem difficult, but being a person that doesn't surrender easily, I find it difficult to accept that it is impossible. Sorry if this topic has been discussed here before... Thank you all in advance!
  8. Dear forum members, I would like to introduce my new book to you. It shows in word and picture over 550 pens, all in connection to the animal kingdom. You will find pens from 80 companies. The book weighs over 1.5 kilo, has more than 200 pages. The attached pages show how the book is structured. Described is also a number of pens that are not shown. Also 100 pens that were sold by well-known auction houses. The book price is USD 150; (euro 124) including shipping. Many thanks for your interest. We do accept paypal (regina.martini@t-online.de). best regards Regina Martini
  9. Greetings. There's such a wealth of information on this site that I decided this would be the best place to seek advise on this matter. The TL;DR (ie. "too long, didn't read" version) of it is: how can I reliably differentiate a real S.T. Dupont pen from a fake, based on studying the pictures alone in an online listing (particularly of the box and paperwork)? When exactly did S.T. Dupont eschew the red presentation box in favor of the black box? And here's the "mindless drivel" version (any photos below are "borrowed" for the purpose of this discussion, they are not my own): As a kid I've always admired fine wristwatches and fine pens. My dad has a pair of Pelikans (a pen and pencil set) which he used for many years, and still uses them now, and I used to look at all the pictures of intricately-designed fountain pens in those glossy magazines. Now I've crossed the big Three-O and have been working for a number of years (in an unsavory environment not actually suited to fine pens). Those intricately-designed pens are still beyond me, but I've decided that it is time to look for a nice pen. It has to be a rollerball or a ballpoint because my terrible handwriting would do no justice to a fountain pen, and partly also because I would like to use this pen for writing, not just for signatures. On a recent vacation back in my hometown, I glanced through the windows of the local S.T. Dupont boutique store in a big shopping centre and saw the Orient Express Prestige Fountain Pen, which is probably the most beautiful piece of man-made corruption I've ever laid my eyes on. The brand itself however, was unknown to me and up to that point, I only knew of Montblancs [...because, who doesn't...] and Pelikans. I spoke about it briefly to my dad who recalls that some of his colleagues did use S.T. Dupont pens. http://i269.photobucket.com/albums/jj64/liquidkiwi/dupontorientexpress_zpsd7614c12.jpg Instead of stepping into that boutique, I gloated at the display for a while before going for lunch, deciding not to embarass myself by walking into a store selling items that I clearly could not afford. And so it was a surprise that during some research later on, I found a goodly amount of new, NOS and second-hand Duponts on sale at an evil online site, some of which were to my liking and well within my means. In the process I learned about the Chinese lacquer that S.T. Dupont uses on some of their products, something that really piqued my interest and firmly set me down the path of buying my first fine pen. It will be an S.T. Dupont pen and it must feature large expanses of Chinese lacquer. As I was made aware by information on this site, as well as others on the internet, there were numerous counterfeit pens on the market, some of them marketed by apparently credible vendors with an extensive and sound rating who many not even be aware that their stock was not legit. I trawled through numerous listings and realized that the greatest challenge was finding a pen that I liked, and that I could be reasonably certain was legit based on pictures alone rather than handling the pen in person. As such I seek advise from people at this forum who are much more knowledgeable about these things. My understanding is that counterfeits have become very good over the years and it can be nearly impossible to tell from the genuine item. However I was wondering if there were any "tell tale" signs that a pen was a fake. Besides studying as close as possible, the fit and finish of a pen in the photos (sometimes difficult since the photos are sometimes not close enough, or worse, blurred), are there any other visible signs I should look for in paperwork or even the box, if those are available as part of the sale? In the older red-boxed pens which were clearly being sold as featuring Chinese lacquer or "laque de chine", I've occasionally seen outer boxes (ie. the paper box that protects the inner presentation box) that have a line of Chinese lacquer symbols (ie. the leaf) running along the upper edge of four sides of the box (ie. front, back, left and right). http://i269.photobucket.com/albums/jj64/liquidkiwi/dupontpenredpacket2_zpsc09c13e1.jpg Some other outer boxes do not have this feature. On the inner red presentation box itself, I have also seen some that have the line of leaf symbols running along the sides of the lid, while some boxes do not have it. Are they both genuine and the difference is simply a change of design? Should all the older laque de chine models feature the lacquer leaf symbol on both boxes? http://i269.photobucket.com/albums/jj64/liquidkiwi/dupontredboxnoleaf_zps88a645d3.jpg The newer Dupont pens now seem to come in black boxes with a purple liner. These appear even more difficult to study because they all look the same to my ill-informed eye. When did they make the change to use black boxes instead of red ones? I have also read an article that makes a sweeping remark to say that genuine pens always fit well into a customized area in a "cushion" inside the presentation box, while pens that are held in place by only a ribbon are likely to be counterfeit. How true is this statement? It is difficult for me to believe this since I do see a lot of pens presented in either fashion. Finally, some of the older NOS/ little used red-boxed pens may on occasion, have their paperwork contained in a red package that itself features a line of Chinese lacquer symbols, as in the picture below. Assuming that nothing is missing from the box, is this an item I should look for in a genuine item or is it the hallmark of a counterfeit? http://i269.photobucket.com/albums/jj64/liquidkiwi/dupontpenredpacket_zpsa0f5570a.jpg Are there any other things that I should be on a lookout for to differentiate a fake for the real thing? Or am I simply imagining that is possible to safely purchase a genuine Dupont pen at an online auction site? Thank you. Any advise would be most appreciated.
  10. hpk90

    Dupont D Initial

    Anybody have any thoughts or experience with the Dupont D Initial fountain pen?
  11. Hello everyone, I just bout this St Dupont fountain pen and needed help to identify it, thank you in advance
  12. Hello! I am interested in this pen but I can't identify which model actually is. I'm not sure wether it is a Classique or a Gatsby or another of the thin type. Thank you.
  13. Hello! I am interested in this pen but I can't identify which model actually is. Thank you. Sorry, I forgot to attach the pictures
  14. Hello! I am interested in this pen but I can't identify which model actually is. I'm not sure wether it is a Classique or a Gatsby or another of the thin type. Thank you.
  15. I recently bought St Dupont Elysee that came with ink cartridge .... however I tried to use an international converter but it did not fit ....are there special converters for St Dupont FP ?
  16. If pens were merely instruments with which we write, FPN would not be as extensive as it is. The truth is that our pens are not only the means of recording our thoughts and everyday tasks; they also say much about our passions, what makes us tick, our aesthetic sense. They are works of art, they give us an object on which to meditate as we are stuck in thought, they tease us with their bemusing patterns and jog our memories of simpler times. This review is about a pen maker who came to the game of making fountain pens relatively late in life, when he had already established his name and reputation as a master silversmith in his homeland of Argentina. Juan Carlos Pallarols is the sixth generation in a long line of silversmiths who in the early 1800s emigrated to Argentina from Catalonia. In his 73 years, he has become the silversmith to the rich and famous in Argentina. The family name Pallarols is found somewhere in practically every important Catholic church in Buenos Aires: chalices, altars, crowns for the Blessed Virgin. It is also found in the halls of civil authority: Every President of Argentina has patronized him in recent history, and his products have been sought after by the crowned heads of Europe and given as gifts to every Pope since St. John Paul II. In fact, the name has traveled the world with decades of visitors to Buenos Aires who have carried far and wide the works of art produced by the silversmith who still lives and works in his house on the Plaza Dorrego, in the heart of bohemian San Telmo. The pen that I present to you today is just such a work of art, but the story of how it came to be made -- its story, in other words -- is, in some ways, as interesting as the intricate chiseling on the body of the pen. In the mid 1980s, I was traveling quite a lot to Argentina and Paraguay. I had not yet dreamt of becoming a lawyer. I was enchanted by the greenery of the jungle, by humid afternoons on a hammock. On one of my trips to Buenos Aires, I was standing in a kiosk downtown, on Calle Maipu, talking to the owners about "yerba mate," the green leaf that grows only in Argentina, Paraguay and southern Brazil and which when dried and ground is drunk as an infusion in a hollowed-out gourd through a silver straw called a "bombilla." Here you see a package of yerba mate, next to a mate gourd and a bombilla. The silver rim on the gourd and the bombilla were also made by Juan Carlos Pallarols . The rim has my monogram engraved onto it as well as the first stanza of the Argentine epic "Martin Fierro" by Jose Hernandez. http://i8.photobucket.com/albums/a42/daoud62/IMG_1386_zps529d12bb.jpg Back to the story unfolding on Calle Maipu: In walked a man who listened intently, and when I left, he asked me more about my interest in the national beverage. I prided myself on being an expert of sorts on mate, and even started quoting words in Guarani, the national language of Paraguay, to show how much I had learned about the custom. I told him I was looking for a special bombilla, a silver one, and he said he could help me. He invited me to his workshop the next day to join him for some mate (and, as it turns out, some wine) because he had a colleague who was from Corrientes, the province bordering Paraguay, where they spoke as much Guarani as Spanish. Juan Carlos and I became friends that day, and I saw him frequently between 1986 and 1990. The last time that I saw him was in February 1990. Life took me to New Orleans, then to the Middle East. I often thought of my times in Argentina, Paraguay, and Uruguay, but never had a chance to return until October 2013. The day after I landed in Buenos Aires, after an absence of a quarter of a century, I took a chance in asking the taxi driver to take me to a house standing on the Plaza Dorrego in San Telmo, where the flea market operates on the weekends and people dance tango almost as if smitten by the Spirit. Perhaps the house now belonged to someone else? Perhaps it had become a restaurant? I rang the bell, and although 24 years had passed since I last saw him, he buzzed me in and, when I got to the top of his marble staircase, he greeted me in the few words in Guarani that I had taught him that day in 1986 on Calle Maipu. I had heard that Juan Carlos Pallarols was making pens because he had come to some of the DC Super Shows. I was in Saudi Arabia or Oman at the time, but I followed with interest this parallel passion. Pallarols had no idea what an aficionado of fountain pens I was. We began to talk. That's when he came up with the idea for a pen for me. This pen is no small object; it weighs in at 93 gm of sterling silver, and when capped it measures exactly as long as a MB 149. Similarly, without the cap, it measures approximately 132 mm from the tip the the nib to the end of the barrel. The nib is a rhodium-plated S.T. Dupont M nib, the hallmark "curved spade" type; the feed and section are likewise made by Dupont. The design on the barrel is of lush tropical vegetation and large leaves. This was Pallarols' idea for me because I so loved the jungle region in Paraguay and Argentina where yerba mate was cultivated. I named the pen "Caaguazu" which means in Guarani "jungle" but also "big leaf." "Caa" is also the Guarani word for yerba mate. As you would expect, the S.T. Dupont nib is silky smooth, but you have to find the sweet spot; this has been the case with every S.T. Dupont I own. I would prefer for the pen to be an eyedropper filler or to use a piston, but the cartridge converter is serviceable. The design on the barrel and cap is mesmerizing, and I never tire of looking at it. Despite the pen's weight, it feels well balanced in my hands. Enjoy the pictures! Bear in mind that the designs on the cap and barrel are not soldered, but actually chiseled into or out of the silver body. http://i8.photobucket.com/albums/a42/daoud62/IMG_1396_zps7b0dd0dd.jpg http://i8.photobucket.com/albums/a42/daoud62/IMG_1378_zps6a7d3ce2.jpg http://i8.photobucket.com/albums/a42/daoud62/IMG_1375_zpsa2b15671.jpg http://i8.photobucket.com/albums/a42/daoud62/IMG_1376_zpsa37824e7.jpg The detail on the leaves -- the veins, the stems -- is beguiling, and every single mark by hand was made with a chisel: http://i8.photobucket.com/albums/a42/daoud62/IMG_1376_zpsa37824e7.jpg http://i8.photobucket.com/albums/a42/daoud62/IMG_1387_zps01115b58.jpg http://i8.photobucket.com/albums/a42/daoud62/IMG_1391_zps7b71f3db.jpg Here is the Caaguazu next to my Sailor Hanzi: http://i8.photobucket.com/albums/a42/daoud62/IMG_1384_zps14ce1d91.jpg Betwixt my Hakase Rosewood and Buffalo Horn pen and the MB Hitchcock: http://i8.photobucket.com/albums/a42/daoud62/IMG_1382_zps52b28de4.jpg Here it is next to a Ralph Prather Titanium 51: http://i8.photobucket.com/albums/a42/daoud62/IMG_1383_zps1679a4a9.jpg The Caaguazu keeps company in the rotation with a MB 149, a Grayson Tighe Mokume-Gane, and a Pelikan 101N Tortoise Shell: http://i8.photobucket.com/albums/a42/daoud62/IMG_1381_zps27003ee0.jpg Here are two other pens that Juan Carlos Pallarols has made. Again, they are exclusive pieces: http://i8.photobucket.com/albums/a42/daoud62/IMG_2721_zps16ea1c22.jpg http://i8.photobucket.com/albums/a42/daoud62/IMG_2702_zps804fc62c.jpg
  17. hi, can anybody help me with this dupont pen set? i inherited it from my aunt and searched on google but i didn't find this model! thanks a lot for your support. best kai
  18. Pedro_Mozzy

    Help Id

    Hello everybody. I inherited a collection of pens of various brands of my family and I'm thinking of selling some. I'm not a person who collects pens, and the truth is that probably there are some that are worth a lot of money.It turns out that there is one that is giving me headaches to find. During the last two days I have searched the internet looking for any information on the model of the pen and found nothing.I wonder if there is someone who knows this model and, if you know can please tell me what model is?The pink rocks that the pen has are rubies?What websites do you recomend to sell them? (ebay, amazon...) I appreciate all your help. I am new to this world of pens. Kind regards,Mozzy
  19. PenBoutique

    007 Spectre

    JAMES BOND SAGA -23 MOVIES NOT INCLUDING #24 007 SPECTRE -#2 BEHIND HARRY POTTER IN WORLDWIDE BOX OFFICE -$6.2 BILLION : TOTAL FRANCHISE REVENUE -SPECTRE : A NEW SUCCESS TO COME , $1.1 BILLION IS PREDICTED. COMING TO US THEATERS NOVEMBER 6th 2015 SKU# Description DUP_C3JBBLACK S.T. Dupont Spectre Black Collector Set DUP_C3JBWHITE S.T. Dupont Spectre White Collector Set SKU# DescriptionDUP_141034 S.T. Dupont D-Line Spectre Black Fountain Pen - MediumDUP_142034 S.T. Dupont D-Line Spectre Black Rollerball PenDUP_145034 S.T. Dupont D-Line Spectre Black Ballpoint PenDUP_141033 S.T. Dupont D-Line Spectre Palladium Fountain Pen - MediumDUP_142033 S.T. Dupont D-Line Spectre Palladium Rollerball PenDUP_145033 S.T. Dupont D-Line Spectre Palladium Ballpoint Pen SKU# DescriptionDUP_405809 S.T. Dupont Defi Spectre Black Ballpoint PenDUP_405810 S.T. Dupont Defi Spectre Palladium Ballpoint Pen The Defi pens should be in stock this week to order.The others are special order and may take 2-3 weeks. You can call or email us for more details.410-992-3272 or 1800-263-2736Support@penboutique.com More images will be uploaded shortly. collectorbox.bmp collectorboxopen.bmp
  20. While I am familiar with the S.T. Dupont Olympio/Orpheo line of twist-action pens being ballpoint-/mechanical pencil-exchangeable, I am wondering if this functionality extended to the Classique 1 and 2 ballpoint pens. I have recently received a rather battered Classique, which I think is one of the first-generation 1970s or early-1980s Classique ballpoint pens, into which I can insert a Dupont mechanical pencil insert; however, twisting the barrel does not propel the lead itself, merely extending and retracting the entire refill like on the ballpoint. On the Olympio, the first twist to an intermediate lock extends the refill and a further twist to a hard lock will extend the lead. In the case of my Classique, there is some looseness about the twist motion and I cannot determine if the mechanism is worn or if the functionality does not actually exist in such an early model. I am fairly certain that the contemporary crop of Classique 2 pens are ballpoint-/pencil-exchangeable. I am not sure if this is relevant but I am convinced of the authenticity of my Classique. Any information or help would be greatly appreciated.
  21. While at an antiques market in London I came across this pen: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/wa4i34axw0nry4b/AACBkDUld8pGJWlX82ku961sa?dl=0 Not knowing anything about pens I wasn't sure what to look for but having held, examined, unscrewed, capping and uncapping it several times, the build and finish felt very nice. It cost me about 100$. The man had a lot of old pens unboxed and two Duponts - one in black and my one you see, the navy one. Both boxed and both he claimed were NOS. I became concerned that it might be a fake when I got back and started to research exactly what I had bought and came across several notices on the Internet to be aware of fake Dupont pens. So here I am. I took a few pictures which you'll see at the link above. I took it to an official dealer today and the talked to a lady there extensively whom couldn't really make up her mind if it was fake or not. She seemed to be under the impression that it was a mixture of an Olympio and a Fidelio as the hood is not present. The feel of the inside parts to her seemed to be not of the same standard as the casing. The nib is unfortunately magnetic. She said she could spot fake Mont Blanc's easily and had been working in the pen business for about 10 years. The box is slightly orange as apposed to red, it's quite worn and looks like it has aged. There is an instruction manual, guarantee card and catalog. What I can say for sure is the Japanese (I read Japanese) in the instruction manual has a lot of very severe mistakes in it. The casing of the pen doesn't look like it has paint simply coated on it; it looks like a coating under a layer of transparent material, if that makes sense. In other words, it doesn't look cheaply made. It has a metallic look, a look not easily replicated by paint alone, though it could be just some plastic processed a special way. In researching the serial number I can only find links to information in Arabic or Chinese. The Chinese when translated points to this serial number as a version of the pen that had only 4000 units made if I'm not mistaken. The serial is 6E8C358 I had read that the pens held with a ribbon in their boxes were most certainly fakes but at the official dealer today they showed me an Olympio they had and the box was the same as mine except for the colour and that fact that it had the D logo of the front side of it. The pen writes nicely, has a good weight and if I paid 100$ for it and the dealer paid say 50$ for it (if fake) then the maker is pushing this kind of quality for about 20-30$... Is that possible? To go to the extent to make a box look aged and even the smell of it points to it being stored somewhere for some time. Please share your opinions - I've done my best to research it but the only thing that is obviously fake is the nib to me. Could it possibly be the case that the casing is real and the insides are replica?
  22. I got this several years ago as a gift from people who also had received it as a gift. It's a Dupont, but that's all I know. The top of the pen barrel has a lip, which pops up. You turn it and that unscrews the barrel. Thanks.
  23. Hello fellow FPNers, I am taking the excuse of perfect natural light conditions to write a short overview of S.T. Dupont's top range, the Néoclassique line. (I am willingly forgetting about the Tournaire pieces, that are, in my opinion, just expensive sculpture which mistakenly got given a nib for unknown reasons). This line is available in two sizes: the normal, Néoclassique size, and the oversize Néoclassique Président size. http://i.imgur.com/qeMVbZt.jpg From Left to right: Néoclassique Président : Magnétisme, Samouraï, Second Empire, and Shanghaï. Néoclassique : Dragon and Samouraï http://i.imgur.com/YPupHa3.jpg Here is a view of the sections, and the nibs. These pens have the biggest and most responsive nibs offered by the brand. The Magnétisme model, which is the only one not to be numbered (albeit being limited), is available in all the regular line widths: EF, F, M, B. I have an EF nib on this one, and it simply is the smoothest extra fine nib I have ever written with. It is comparable to my early 1990's Montblanc 149 EF nib, as it also has a particular grounding, which gives a vertical stroke that is finer than the horizontal one, and the nib is flexible enough to give a B line. It is just closer to a average EF (the Montblanc one providing with a larger line). The limited editions are only available in the M size, which is a pity, if you ask me). They come in sets (with a pen stand and an inkwell) or as standalone pens. Of course, these pens aren't cheap, but are not unaffordable either, and they offer everything a pen collector may ask (except for a piston filling system, but this isn't one of my priorities). There are even more exclusive pens for each of the Président limited editions - a limited edition inside the limited edition, if you like - made of solid gold, and limited to two or three dozens, but there, we are reaching the 50k€+ range, so I don't think I would ever be interested, even if I had that kind of money). I hope you enjoyed this short introduction to an undeservingly underrated line of pens.
  24. Hi all, I have had this blue lacquer S.T. Dupont fountain pen for many years - more than 30! - it has two Chinese characters that I understand are the phonetic equivalent of "Du Pont". I understand that there was only one Dupont artisan that inscribed these characters by hand on each and every product, lighters as well as pens. One day he died and the tradition ended. Has anyone ever heard of this story. Can details or parts thereof be verified? Would love to know that I'm not completely off my rocker... Thanks!





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