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  1. I was wondering if I could see your kaweco double broad nibs? I’m a little worried that I got a fake one 😕 my double broad has deeper etching and slightly wider design than that of my EF (which came from germany). Also, the etching it slight bronzed. Doesnt show in picture but noticeable when observed keenly in person. Also, it took me 30 mins for it to write. Then I have to squeeze the catridge everytime I want to use it. Never had a problem with my other kawecos.
  2. How long does it take for the Kaweco fountain pens to ink the first time? I inserted the cartridge that goes with it but its not writing The ink in the cartridge is not dry. I have shaken the pen and everything and no ink is coming out. Im leaving it pointed down waiting for the ink. I'm using a double broad nib.
  3. "Humanity can live without science, it can live without bread, but it cannot live without beauty. Without beauty, there would be nothing left to do in this life. Here the secret lies. Here lies the entire story." Dostoevsky. The Montblanc Writers Edition Dostoevsky fountain pen was released in 1997 with a 'limited' number of 16,300 fountain pens. It is a suitably moody pen for a writer who often plunged the dark depths of the human psyche, yet it's moodiness comes with a terrible beauty too. When Montblanc get their designs right, they really do get them right, producing miniature little works of art that are entirely functional and a true joy to own. I love this pen, but it has had a somewhat tragic history with me that has only recently resolved itself - more on that later. I bought this pen on the second hand market several years ago at what I thought was a very good price. The price of this pen (along with the Voltaire I was eyeing at the same time) seems to have significantly increased over the last couple of years. I'm not entirely sure why that is, but they do seem to be a little rarer than they once were which is perhaps pushing the price up, often well over the thousand euro mark which I would consider to be a little painful on the old purse. The pen came with its original packaging; a cardboard box shaped like a book with a black satin inlay where the pen rests. Many people like the boxes but I can't say I'm a fan. They are fine but not something I can get excited about. I think it's a shame they never include a copy of the author's work. This pen originally came with a fine nib that was quite soft, but didn't offer flexibility and expression, but it did have a curious, very slightly stubbish aspect and was quite different from a lot of other Writer's Edition nibs. I liked it and loved the feel, length, weight and balance of the pen posted. The concave grip is small and a little thinner than most Montblanc's, but comfortable. Sadly, I dropped it one day. The nib didn't appear damaged to the eye, but it did compact the left tine making it a little like an awkward oblique. It wasn't going to be something I could repair and in spite of my attempts to continue writing with it I had to admit defeat. Then someone here on FPN mentioned that they sent off their Agatha for a nib exchange and promptly got one. I decided to risk the same and plumbed for a double broad nib. I didn't have high hopes of getting it, but two weeks later the pen was returned with a double broad nib, re-gilded signature on the cap, re-plated gold on the top of the clip, a blemish removed from a cap ring and the whole pen polished and looking like new and all for less than the price of a Pelikan M1000 nib exchange. I am impressed by their customer service. Now to the pen. It's a back resin pen with an ivory snow peak on the cap (the older WE's in an old fashioned vintage style tend to have ivory coloured peaks rather than a pure white - a nice touch) and has a stormy blue ink window (minus the facets). The cap, grip and piston nob are plain, but the barrel of the pen has an engraved pattern reminiscent of either Imperial Russia or a riff on Russian folk material designs (depending on who you read - Montblanc say it's a nod to Imperial Russia). The furniture is gold plated with similar geometric designs of x's and diamonds that are found on the barrel. The clip narrows down to a ball that houses a rather moody looking sapphire. The screw cap comes off with three turns to reveal an 18K gold nib with an imprinted geometric design that is similar, but different to the barrel and cap bands. The cap is domed in a vintage style and the piston nob is a touch flatter with a metal (brass?) piston mechanism. The pen posts securely. The details are: 5.75 inches capped, 6.30 inches posted and 28g in weight, filled. The author's signature is on the cap, to the right of the clip, and gilded in gold. The pen is a piston filler that is smooth as butter and fills easily - you can fill it by dipping the nib only so you don;t have to immerse the whole nib and section. The double broad nib is quite crisp. On the sample above it was written on slightly poor paper so it soaked in slightly. The BB nibs have a beautiful quality; incredibly smooth and very wet with a stub aspect and a true joy to write with. I normally buy fine and extra fine nibs, but I do love these double broad nibs. Be aware that now and again you can get one that has quite a lot of oils residue in the nib housing that can make the nib either a slightly hard starter or skip slightly when first writing. A good and thorough flush will rid you of the residue and the nib should write like a dream. I am very fond of this pen. I love the old vintage nods that Montblanc really does so well. It's a joy to use and own and a fitting tribute to Dostoevsky. Probably best described as a terrible beauty.
  4. This is my first Kaweco and I really dont know why I waited so long. Im really happy with this pen even as a daily writer despite the ultra small size. I went against all better judgement and ordered a double broad nib on a pocket pen and boy am I glad I did! It writes like a very nice stub nib with about a 1mm line width. This may be common knowledge with Kawecos but it was news to me. My only complaint about the nib is that it was on the bleeding edge of babys bottom and actually showed mild hard starts on the first letter. This was easily fixed with a short polish with 4K micromesh and then a few runs on 6k to get rid of the squeakyness. It writes very well after a small amount of work. The cartridge seems to last about as long as it does in a standard stub nib pen so far. I plan to refill it with a syringe of which is extremely easy. I would say even easier than a converter actually. The Fireblue finish is awesome! Every angle of the pen is interesting. Theres always something new. There is a very high premium paid for it though. Not sure if its worth it to everyone but it does look cool. The Fireblue finish cost me an extra $40 over raw stainless with a deep massdrop discount. I just bought a raw stainless version as well so Ill see how close I can come to Fireblue with a mapp gas torch and some cutting oil. I suppose youre partly paying for the story behind the process with the CEO of Kaweco personally torching each pen and matching the caps to pen bodies. Thats kind of cool and worth the extra cost to me. It adds a little something special to the pen regardless even if I can replicate the finish on a raw stainless pen myself for much less. The form factor is very convenient. Its super small and makes my Montegrappa Micra look like a full size pen. I can barely use the Liliput unposted. It fits mid web between my thumb and pointer finger. I wear a medium glove for reference. For quick writing it can be used effectively with average sized hands. For anything longer than a few sentences, the pen should be posted for stability. My only gripe here is I wish Kaweco would have not threaded the pen body all the way to the full radius at the top. Theres only one entrance to the threads capping the pen and posting. Many times you need to hunt and peck to post the pen since theres no staging area to align the cap to the body before you get to the threads. Also with only one thread entrance, you will need to rotated the cap almost 360 deg around before it will catch a thread many times, thus rolling off the body. Its a little annoying in a hurry. Overall this is an extremely unique pen and can perform as well as a full size pen when posted. Its ridiculously small of which is great. You can opt for a double broad/stub nib in basically the smallest fountain pen on the market with just a standard international cartridge?! I salute you Kaweco for making it possible for me to indulge in my insane pen specifications on this one! Its a completely crazy pen in this configuration but just awesome! Im very happy with it and its never dull or boring! Ive been writing with it all week and its not even gotten close to old. The kicker is, I believe the Karas Kustoms K titanium Bock nib will fit this pen. Im going to order a nib and report back. A semi flex pocket pen?!! You got to be kidding me! Thats just a good time right there! No one will see that one coming.
  5. This is my first Kaweco and I really dont know why I waited so long. Im really happy with this pen even as a daily writer despite the ultra small size. I went against all better judgement and ordered a double broad nib on a pocket pen and boy am I glad I did! It writes like a very nice stub nib with about a 1mm line width. This may be common knowledge with Kawecos but it was news to me. My only complaint about the nib is that it was on the bleeding edge of babys bottom and actually showed mild hard starts on the first letter. This was easily fixed with a short polish with 4K micromesh and then a few runs on 6k to get rid of the squeakyness. It writes very well after a small amount of work. The cartridge seems to last about as long as it does in a standard stub nib pen so far. I plan to refill it with a syringe of which is extremely easy. I would say even easier than a converter actually. The Fireblue finish is awesome! Every angle of the pen is interesting. Theres always something new. There is a very high premium paid for it though. Not sure if its worth it to everyone but it does look cool. The Fireblue finish cost me an extra $40 over raw stainless with a deep massdrop discount. I just bought a raw stainless version as well so Ill see how close I can come to Fireblue with a mapp gas torch and some cutting oil. I suppose youre partly paying for the story behind the process with the CEO of Kaweco personally torching each pen and matching the caps to pen bodies. Thats kind of cool and worth the extra cost to me. It adds a little something special to the pen regardless even if I can replicate the finish on a raw stainless pen myself for much less. The form factor is very convenient. Its super small and makes my Montegrappa Micra look like a full size pen. I can barely use the Liliput unposted. It fits mid web between my thumb and pointer finger. I wear a medium glove for reference. For quick writing it can be used effectively with average sized hands. For anything longer than a few sentences, the pen should be posted for stability. My only gripe here is I wish Kaweco would have not threaded the pen body all the way to the full radius at the top. Theres only one entrance to the threads capping the pen and posting. Many times you need to hunt and peck to post the pen since theres no staging area to align the cap to the body before you get to the threads. Also with only one thread entrance, you will need to rotated the cap almost 360 deg around before it will catch a thread many times, thus rolling off the body. Its a little annoying in a hurry. Overall this is an extremely unique pen and can perform as well as a full size pen when posted. Its ridiculously small of which is great. You can opt for a double broad/stub nib in basically the smallest fountain pen on the market with just a standard international cartridge?! I salute you Kaweco for making it possible for me to indulge in my insane pen specifications on this one! Its a completely crazy pen in this configuration but just awesome! Im very happy with it and its never dull or boring! Ive been writing with it all week and its not even gotten close to old. The kicker is, I believe the Karas Kustoms K titanium Bock nib will fit this pen. Im going to order a nib and report back. A semi flex pocket pen?!! You got to be kidding me! Thats just a good time right there! No one will see that one coming.
  6. Hello FPN, I'm back after a long hiatus. Yesterday I made a trip to the cross company store where they had some NOS Century II's. I quickly looked and saw that one had a "B" on the nib. But upon getting it home and inspecting it closely, it was actually a "BB". I had never seen a Cross BB nib before. Anyway, check out the photos. The bottom nib in both photos is the BB and the top is my Cross Signature "B" nib for comparison.
  7. I bought a Pilot 78G with a BB (1.5mm flat stub) nib which writes well if I bear down on the nib, nothing extreme but heavy handed like with a ballpoint that doesn't write well. With no pressure it basically doesn't write at all. I want to put document proof ink it for signatures but, I can't live with the pressure needed to get ink to flow. When I bear down it seems to write well at the speed I write so, I'm guessing the feed is adequate and the nib itself needs to be tweaked. The slit between the tines appears to be a bit too tight which is what I think is the problem. What do I do to increase ink flow to the tip without excessive writing pressure? Is this something a total novice can do without too much risk of screwing up the pen? TIA, Sid
  8. I have heard numerous rumors that major makers, e.g., Montblanc, Pelikan, Parker, will no longer produce very broad or other specialty nibs, the type that a nibmeister can use for a good custom grind. Does anyone know the details of what is or is not going to be available? I have ordered a BB for my Pelikan M1000 that I intend to send to Pendleton Brown, but I would like to know what else may be in short supply. Thanks!
  9. Hello, I'm considering an Aurora BB nib, and would love to heard from anyone with experience of using them. I am hoping for something stubbish, giving some line variation but not quite as much as a true stub, since the narrower line width does not suit my forward-slanting writing, particularly as the Aurora stub has no tipping material! Can anyone please confirm if current Aurora BB nibs are stubbish? A writing sample would be fabulous, especially one comparing stub and BB writing
  10. I've been collecting fountain pens for a while, a small hobby that my friend had noticed. All of my fountain pens are in the thinnest side of fineness, ranging from Pilot's EF, Platinum's UEF, to Sailor's Saibi Togi. He's asking me if I could find a moderately priced fountain pen with at least a 1 mm nib. He made certain that it should be a fountain pen and not a calligraphic pen such as Pilot parallel, Lamy Joy, and Rotring Artpen. He had tried a Pilot Metropolitan with Broad nib, and he wants it to be that smooth. I've been looking at TWSBI for some time, with the 1.1 and 1.5 mm stub nib. I also noticed the more than usual comments of the pen acting up. I have no issues with that, since I know my way around fountain pen tinkering and adjustment, but I doubt he would like it if his pen is acting up. Also, Kaweco is out of question for the shape and Nemosine is 0.2 mm thinner than requested. So I hope this community could help me with finding the best fountain pen with a really broad nib priced under 80 USD that's just as fine as japanese fountain pens. Or at least tell if there's none in the market.
  11. Hey Everyone! This is my first Review, so take a look and let me know what you think! I know there have been a ton of reviews on the 3776 series in general, but I have not seen much about the "C" Double-Broad nib. Thanks!!
  12. How has your nib prefer eve changed over the years? I used to buy fine and extra fine nibs exclusively until about seven years ago, when I started getting into broad and upwards. Now, my standard nib is is almost always going to be a stub or cursive italic, and wouldn't bother with anything smaller. I think larger nibs can be more demanding to use, but also help in maintaining a clear hand. Any thoughts?





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