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  1. Hello everyone, This is my first post back after being away from FPN for a very, very long time and I come seeking your help. I need a new blue ink. I was in love with Montblanc Meisterstuck Diamond Blue ink (see review here: https://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/topic/225885-montblanc-meisterstuck-diamond/) and I am drawing to the end of my supply. I liked its' subdued colouring and how it shaded. In a way it sort of reminded me of old recipe Sheaffer Blue. So I now seek your collective knowledge and help. What blue do you suggest I use that either: 1. comes close in appearance/replicating the beloved Diamond; or 2. New colour blue but has good shading and lubrication qualities. Thanks for your help, P
  2. dcameraman

    Brecciated Quartz Pen

    Here is a Jr. Statesman Fountain Pen. It is made with Brecciated Quartz. That just means that at some point it was crushed up and then re-fused back together. The fit isn't as good as I would like, but I'm getting better. Comments and criticisms are welcome.
  3. soniknitr

    Twsbi Diamond 580 Review

    With the latest Twsbi Eco making news, I decided to give my old 580 another shot just to make sure whether I should go for another. Find one is good enough for me (personal opinion). Here is also a link to my blog: TWSBI Diamond 580 Review Here goes my review of the 580: My sole motivation behind getting a TWSBI was to disassemble the pen and have all the fun, which I missed. And I got a clear demonstrator, packaged with a nice-looking wrench. THE TWSBI STORY TWSBI (called Twiz-Bee) refers to San Wen Tong, i.e when TWS is spelled backwards and it means ‘Hall of Three Cultures’ according to their website. BI at the end refers to writing instruments. Ta Shin Precision manufactured everything from toy lego parts to high-end writing instruments for several luxury brands (both American & Japanese) for well over 40 years. So that’s plastic, metal & precision, precisely what’s required to make and sell a nice writing instrument, under your own brand name. Which luxury brands? They don’t reveal those due to privacy agreements. I have reasonable doubt from various reviews that one of them is Levenger. And TWSBI Nibs are said to be sourced from JoWo (earlier it was Bock & Schimdt), Germany (same as for Faber-Castell Design Pens). THE FPN CONNECTION An FPN member by the name of speedy started a post with a prototype development for an inexpensive piston filling fountain pen somewhere around late October, 2009. He clarified that he was a pen-maker and shared pictures of TWSBI 530 prototypes in this post. It showed a metallic piston system. And it became a popular brand within a short period of time. http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-aXanzzgVZpc/Vb2tFd_RXXI/AAAAAAAAFAc/VMOIxx7069c/s1600/Prototype.jpg PRESENTATION That’s probably one of the great aspects of marketing. Inside a brown cardboard box, you will find the pen residing within a clear plastic case. You will instantly fall in love with the presentation part of it. For the lack of a better word, I call it The Apple packaging. http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-2v-U9j8mEdg/Vb2r5a2wXVI/AAAAAAAAE_Q/PCrDoboa4xw/s1600/DSC_4802.jpg There is an instruction sheet on disassembly of the pen, highlighting the pen parts. Below the white pen-holding shelf, you will find the 7mm TWSBI wrench and a vial of silicone grease in two slots. http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-1wEqgLBfRVA/Vb2tSxNRwAI/AAAAAAAAFA0/8dvHgT0DmhA/s1600/box.jpg DESIGN - THE GEOMETRICAL TRANSPARENCY (4/6) The build looks sturdy without adding much weight. Plastic economizes both cost and weight of fittings. This pen endorses practical utility rather than art with which you will probably associate a Pelikan or a Visconti. I do find an element of industrial look with the pen. http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-COLWtQyBr-o/Vb2rvkWHSqI/AAAAAAAAE_I/_C5pGu7HVTk/s1600/DSC_4833.jpg Most of it is visible engineering, while use of plastic is quite evident in its piston-system. The barrel and cap are made of thick polycarbonate, with a protective heat treated layer for increased resistance to scratches, along with the crystal transparence. The overall fitment is still an area of improvement. One of my experiences is with the piston knob, which does not tighten itself well, as the piston head is pulled back in. http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-vVlXAJhf34U/Vb2r7Unlx0I/AAAAAAAAE_Y/A6R6VKiUpMQ/s1600/DSC_4829.jpg The cap feels substantial and unscrews with a single turn, revealing a rather dagger-like nib. There is a metallic insert for the nib unit, supplying necessary chrome accents for the aesthetics. The piston knob has a rather broad ring making the mark for disassembly. Multiple polygonal planes orchestrate light effectively within, dazzling both the pen and the ink inside the barrel. The decagonal geometry also prevents an open pen from rolling away. http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-5lnoYSQczHQ/Vb2sO5WHmuI/AAAAAAAAE_w/coWF8V-uyck/s1600/DSC_4837.jpg The cap has a wide chrome band carrying a laser engraved TWSBI on one side of it and DIAMOND 580 TAIWAN on the other, in three separate lines. Two concentric circles run on this band in the form of imprints. The finial carries a vibrant red & silver TWSBI logo of three pillars within a dome of transparent acrylic. The clip is spring-loaded within a visible system having a chrome tassie and it has a geometrical pyramid-like cut. The cap is heavy and has a smooth circular cross section which can roll the entire pen easily with its weight, until the clip restricts it. You can also observe the relatively greyish inner cap, which prevents the nib from drying out. http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-hvFDb1IoLBQ/Vb2tS3yDViI/AAAAAAAAFA4/O1cIkYuxahU/s1600/cap.jpg FILLING SYSTEM (5/6) As a piston filler, it does have a good ink capacity around 1.8~2mL. The knob unscrews with three complete turns and manages to draw ink quite efficiently from the bottle. The feeder hole is rather a channel to enable efficient ink suction. One of the improvements could be with the piston knob, which should increasingly tighten itself, as the piston head is pulled back in. Mine stays loosely fastened (after I applied some silicone grease on the piston head) and is directly proportional to the friction at the piston head. http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-zyu-R2d4OIY/Vb2tEOw3cII/AAAAAAAAFAY/b53TOE9_aQc/s1600/Filler.jpg DISASSEMBLY For this phase, rather than learning from the manual, you can have a look at a 580 disassembly video. I like the one with gouletpens or srebrown. Make sure you thoroughly flush the pen with water before disassembling it. 1. Rotating the piston end-cap counter-clockwise, the piston seal is lowered to a hinged stop inside the barrel. 2. Fit the wrench just below the piston-end-cap, which can unscrewed in a clockwise direction from the piston-knob. http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-NUkTmOyn-1U/Vb2sxi3fPxI/AAAAAAAAFAI/7YzC3qXppfM/s1600/DSC_4903.jpg 3. The piston mechanism has five different parts as you can see in the picture, though it’s not necessary to remove the rubber piston seal (or head) from the piston rod (spindle). The fittings of the mechanism can be made from higher grade material. http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-I1IdSoPmNms/Vb2sps-rsbI/AAAAAAAAFAA/LSsSEwOPHFE/s1600/DSC_4913%2Bcopy.jpg 4. The nib unit can be easily removed by first unscrewing the grip section from the barrel. 5. Since, nib is friction fit, you may remove the nib and feed from the unit, in case there is some heavy cleaning required (in case of a bad flow, sometimes the feed is coated with grease which restricts ink-flow). 6. Make sure you apply an adequate amount of silicone grease to the sides of the rubber piston seal (you may ignore the bottom surface) before reassembly. NIB - ALL THAT MATTERS (4/6) The nib/feed unit can be taken out or apart for cleaning purposes. The nib is stainless steel and has a rather small dagger-like design. It comes with four stock widths - EF, F, M, B and two special widths of Stub 1.1 & Stub 1.5. http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-pUw5Vdlnev4/Vb2sIzRr7-I/AAAAAAAAE_k/h6rOBMIZtfQ/s1600/DSC_4877.jpg The tail end specifies carries the nib width while the name TWSBI along with the logo rest above the tail. There are some curves adorning the inside symmetry of the tines. To be honest it’s kind of a plain design with limited nib leverage. A black plastic feed with a feed channel for ink suction and the thin fins on the other side ensures a good buffer capacity and prevents hard-starts. http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-vdkLuAmZ2NI/Vb2sJai3UzI/AAAAAAAAE_o/fZXFoCmyeW8/s1600/DSC_4893.jpg Earlier, TWSBI used to source its nibs from Schmidt and then Bock, which is incidentally the nib-supplier for Faber-Castell too. But it’s the alloys and then post-processing that can make a lot of difference even in steel-nibs. PHYSICS OF IT (6/6) – RELATIVELY SPEAKING The pen filled with ink, does have a good balance in terms of both weight and length. The pen is not meant to be posted. The grip is quite comfortable with a section around 1 cm thick. Uncapped Length ~ 13 cm Capped Length ~ 14 cm Nib Leverage ~ 2 cm Overall Weight ~ 28 g (Cap Weight ~ 14 g) Capped and uncapped and posted with a pelikan m805 runs below for your reference. A capped 580 looks similar to a m805. http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-NlHUezEy6vA/Vb2soSwhyvI/AAAAAAAAE_4/yewH-68smxg/s1600/DSC_4929.jpg Uncapped it obviously lacks the nib of a m805, although the lengths are well-matched. http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-zIo52iiZJXE/Vb2tCnSS2lI/AAAAAAAAFAQ/0xh7oZmbYUU/s1600/DSC_4937.jpg ECONOMIC VALUE (4/6) It retails at around Rs 5,500 ($ 86) here and I got it from a local store at around $ 70. The problem with ordering it from TWSBI’s website directly is that apart from heavy shipping charges, there are unseen duties to be paid for. Given the fact that you could get one of the usual butter-smooth and more responsive steel-nibbed Faber-Castell pens at a similar or even lesser price, it’s rather a decision of piston vs converter. I hope that the retail prices will get evened out with demand. OVERALL (4.6/6) This nib is wet with a hint of feedback which is expected of fine nibs. I purposely used a less wet ink, since the pen runs smooth with wet inks. There is some line variation which is evident with thicker vertical lines. A complete absence of any perceptible softness in this nib, kills the responsiveness part. The fine nib lays a line which runs between Japanese Fines and European Fines. Being a wet writer out of the box, the Fine nib puts a line which takes around 16-17 seconds to dry on MD Paper with Pelikan 4001 ink. http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-CwXFByod9IE/Vb2tIszp84I/AAAAAAAAFAo/K60KSx721a8/s1600/DSC_4943.jpg INNER CAP - INK RESIDUE In case you find any ink trapped between the inner cap and the cap, a wooden pencil fitted with attached eraser, can help clean it. I have experienced this kind of leakage during air-travel. 1. Take the wooden pencil (Standard #2) and insert the eraser-end into the cap. 2. Bend the cap in one direction, while putting pressure on the eraser in the opposite direction. 3. Slowly use the friction created by the eraser to pull out the inner cap. 4. Wash the ink out (Plain water is fine). 5. Re-insert the inner cap, and screw the pen back in, and it should friction-fit back into its original position. REFERENCES FPN TWSBI Bock Clientele Ink Residue Disassembly - gouletpens, srebrown Thank you for going through the review. You can find some more pen and paraphernalia reviews here.
  4. mehandiratta

    Anybody Buying & Using Twsbi In India?

    Hello FPN Members Trying to get hold of TWSBI DIAMOND 580 at the prices comparable to international market.... can any one guide... what is your opinion about using these pens.... Looking forward to hear from Indian friends especially
  5. airline0

    David Oscarson Les Quatre Couleurs

    David Oscarson Les Quatre Couleurs The four suits now used in most of the world – Spades, Hearts, Diamonds and Clubs – originated in France about 1480. The Spade represents nobility or aristocracy; the Heart represents the Church or Clergy; the Diamond represents merchants or the wealthy and the Club represents peasantry with its reference to clover, or the food of swine. The Quatre Couleurs Collection incorporates multiple levels of guilloché engraving and a combination of translucent and opaque hard enamel. The entire body of each pen is first cut down to the level of the background, leaving the outer and inner lines of the four suits and decorative filigree motif in high relief. Translucent and opaque enamels are repeatedly kiln-fired and filed by hand, resulting in the beautiful and enduring finish of true Hard Enamel. For inquiries email us at orders@airlineintl.com
  6. airline0

    David Oscarson Les Quatre Couleurs

    David Oscarson Les Quatre Couleurs The four suits now used in most of the world – Spades, Hearts, Diamonds and Clubs – originated in France about 1480. The Spade represents nobility or aristocracy; the Heart represents the Church or Clergy; the Diamond represents merchants or the wealthy and the Club represents peasantry with its reference to clover, or the food of swine. The Quatre Couleurs Collection incorporates multiple levels of guilloché engraving and a combination of translucent and opaque hard enamel. The entire body of each pen is first cut down to the level of the background, leaving the outer and inner lines of the four suits and decorative filigree motif in high relief. Translucent and opaque enamels are repeatedly kiln-fired and filed by hand, resulting in the beautiful and enduring finish of true Hard Enamel. For inquiries email us at orders@airlineintl.com
  7. The mythological animal, Phoenix, has been watching over S.T Dupont ever since the brand was founded, giving them a passionate love for fire that transformed into art! This summer the Phoenix has reborn bringing three new collections: Phoenix Diamond, Phoenix Prestige and Phoenix Premium The Prestige collection: Natural laquer is enhanced by gold-finished insert. Every piece is hand-made individually and adorned with two citrine stones, the pen comes with a hand-sculpted Phoenix statue on a matching lacquered stand. The collection has 2016 pieces from which 30 are numbered. The Premium collection: The pieces of this collection stand out for their smoky black and grey lacquer sprinkled with meteorite dust. They are enhanced by gracefully engraved details with palladium finishes. You may complete the collection with matching cufflinks and luxury lighter. Limited to 2016 pieces. The Diamond collection: Smoky violet and black lacquer makes the perfect combination with the hand-scupted Phoenix which is plated with precious platinum. Each piece is produced by special order of 10 numbered pieces, enhanced with a 0.45 carat diamond solitaire. Part of the Phoenix collection is already available at Iguana Sell and more coming next week! For further information do not hesitate to contact us through info@iguanasell.com Don't to check it out: https://www.iguanasell.com/search?type=product&q=s.t+dupont+phoenix Take a peek at the Premium rollerball below!
  8. I recently had a Mont Blanc Diamond LeGrand fail. The pen was in my travel bag on a trip. When I opened the bag and checked my pen holder, I noticed the barrel had broken off at the end. Either the bag took a sharp impact or the barrel failed. I contacted a local Mont Blanc authorized dealer regarding repair and they indicated there was no option for repair. It was purchased in 2011 in the UK from Herrod's who is an authorized dealer and all of the paperwork, receipts, and boxes are still in my possession. The dealer indicated the pen did not have a repair option and I should look at a new pen. Seems crazy for an $600 pen. The diamond cap and other parts are all still intact. The barrel failed at the spring on the back end. I simply want to order a replacement barrel, not an entirely new pen. What are my options and any suggestions as to an Authorized Dealer who may be able to get parts? Thank you. Chris
  9. Eclectica

    Twsbi Diamond 580 'o's ?

    Hi there, Apologies in advance for such a silly question! I have had a TWSBI diamond 580 for a while and was giving it a good clean the other day - you know, nib/section unscrewed and shaking the water out of the piston etc. - when I had a horrible thought that there might have been an 'O' ring in there somewhere. I looked on the floor but found nothing - if it was there, it could have gone down the plughole in sink, bath or worse! Now looking at the updated diagram of the 580 as supplied clearly shows 3 'o'-rings. http://www.peggysparlour.co.uk/pubpics/twsbi580-1.jpg Mine now does not have an 'o' ring immediately behind the feed where it connects to the piston reservoir. This is most likely 'o'-ring 3 in the diagram, albeit when in working position, it is to the left of 'o'-ring 7 on the inside. (It has the other 2 'o'-rings though; on the body and under the metal nib ring). http://www.peggysparlour.co.uk/pubpics/twsbi580.jpg My question is - Is the 'o'-ring at the union of the end of the black feed to the clear plastic piston body actually necessary or actually ever present? (If I need one where can I get one?) Clearly, I do not want to be in the situation where everything starts leaking all over the place in an important meeting etc! Happy New Year all. Eclectica
  10. Hi I recently bought this pen from ebay. It cost 400GBP at an auction! Initially I thought this was a bargain. Now I have doubts, whether this is real or fake. 3 things basically that concern me: 1) Feels extremely light. What is the weight of this pen? 2) The tip of the barrel is "very black" slightly different to the remaining of the barrel. reminds me some of the cheap counterfeits you see of metal starwalker pens you see on eBay. I have tried to capture that on the photos. 3) The Instructions booklet has a lot of Chinese instructions and certificate is right at the end. Now having said that I tried to compare this pen with the few available images on the net and it is not far off the nib barrel cap and so on. It has a serial number next to clip and the words Germany metal and Pix under the clip (but nowadays many fake do so). Also when you put it in bright light you can see the red tinge of the resin. Also like my rest of the MB FP when you place a magnet next to the nib it repels it. Can someone help me solve my dilemma. Ideally someone who knows or has this pen. What's the length of this pen with and without the cap. Also what was the original price of this pen? Cheers in advance.
  11. Here is another take on a TWSBI 580 Diamond FP with a Fine nib. The reviews at fpn did make me finally buy a TWSBI, just for the fun of dis-assembly and maintenance. In case there are any problems with pictures you can go to the below link on my blog. http://iwonder-thecartographer.blogspot.in/2014/11/twsbi-diamond-580-review.html Why did I get one ?Well, just to disassemble the pen and have all the fun. Plus, I get a clear demonstrator and a nice-looking wrench. What on earth is a TWSBI? (For the uninitiated like me, I doubt there are any left )TWSBI (called Twiz-Bee) refers to “San Wen Tong”, i.e when TWS is spelled backwards and it means ‘Hall of Three Cultures’ according to their website. BI at the end refers to “writing instruments”. And the company, Ta Shin Precision manufactured everything from toy lego parts to high-end writing instruments (as an OEM) for several luxury brands (American & Japanese) for well over 40 years. So that’s plastic, metal & precision, precisely what’s required to make and sell a lovely writing instrument, under your own brand name. Which luxury brands? They don’t tell it due to privacy agreements. I have reasonable doubt from various reviews that one of them is Levenger. Also, TWSBI Nibs are said to be sourced from JoWo, Germany (same as for Faber-Castell Design Pens). PackagingThat’s probably one of the great aspects of marketing the pen. For the lack of any other word, let’s call it ‘Apple’ packaging inside a brown cardboard box. http://s25.postimg.org/r1745r4mn/DSC_1025.jpgThere is an instruction sheet on disassembly of the pen, highlighting the pen parts.http://s25.postimg.org/m53he24hb/DSC_1029.jpghttp://s25.postimg.org/p5fqguqen/DSC_1031.jpgBelow the white pen-holding shelf, you will find the 7mm TWSBI wrench and a small bottle of silicone grease fitted into slots.http://s25.postimg.org/8j2rlimun/DSC_1036.jpg 580 DiamondWith a screw fit cap and relatively technical construction right from the nib unit to the end cap, this pen endorses practical utility rather than art (with which you will probably associate a Pelikan or a Visconti or an MB with). The entire pen along with the cap is made to disassemble, clean and reassemble. With a 13 cm length and comfortable grip diameter of 1cm, it can be used unposted with ease. The polygonal planes (Diamond-cut) shape of the barrel (almost a decagonal cross-section) prevents the pen from slipping and makes it quite photogenic for posing too . Cap has a circular cross section though. Embossed on the tail (steel bracket) band of the cap is TWSBI on one side and Diamond & 580 & TAIWAN on the other. http://s25.postimg.org/4k0yoy8tr/DSC_1043.jpghttp://s25.postimg.org/6fscdun1r/DSC_1048.jpg Posting gives it a space shuttle like appearance and the posted thing is altogether heavy and way too long.http://s25.postimg.org/9g96udycv/DSC_1056.jpgThe finial carries the TWSBI trademarked logo on a red background. Clip has a smooth modern design with a diamond cut and quite springy to use. http://s25.postimg.org/ddwgjsl67/DSC_1060.jpg Nib has an industrial sword like look, and the unit is easy detachable and can be unscrewed from the grip section. Embossed is a brief arabesque along the tines with TWSBI logo, name and nib size mentioned at the tail-end. The metal cross section does amplify the industrial design of the pen. http://s25.postimg.org/f0lo50x7z/DSC_1068.jpg Along with the Custom 823 I am making a comparison with custom 823 only for its size. The nib and construction are very different for these two pens. And a pilot custom 823 is a heavier pen with a really big nib. http://s25.postimg.org/qklwjbgvj/DSC_1070.jpg http://s25.postimg.org/krbuir57z/DSC_1072.jpg Disassembly For this phase, rather than from the manual, you can have a look at a 580 disassembly video. I like the one with gouletpens or srebrown. However, do check the warranty terms, if you are not very sure of fixing it yourself. Make sure you flush the pen completely before doing it . By rotating the piston end-cap counter-clockwise, the piston seal is lowered to a hinged stop inside the barrel. The wrench then can be fitted just below the piston-end-cap (below the metal band), which is unscrewed in a clockwise direction from the piston-top. http://s25.postimg.org/64fhetvzj/DSC_1074.jpg The piston mechanism has five different parts as you can see in the picture, though it’s might not be necessary to remove the rubber piston seal from the piston rod. The nib unit can be easily removed by first unscrewing the grip section from the barrel and then the nib unit can be removed. Since, nib is friction fit, you may remove the nib and feed from the unit, in case there is some heavy cleaning required (in case of a bad flow, sometimes the feed is coated with grease which restricts ink-flow). However, if your flow is good, I don’t think there is anything broke to fix in the first place . http://s25.postimg.org/hob4fdq9b/DSC_1078.jpg Rest, reassembly might be an initial frustration and it took me a while to learn to fit the piston parts properly.Initially, I was left with the piston seal and rod inside (while everything else was outside!), while I tried to reassemble the pen for the first time. Tried many different things with tweezers, ear-buds and finally could remove it by using the piston parts only. My guess is that a little bit of experiment is required to get used to this. Make sure you apply an adequate amount of silicone grease to the sides of the rubber piston seal (you may ignore the bottom surface) at the end of the piston-rod, so that it glides smoothly along the barrel. I did that in the second reassembly attempt, because the piston seal seemed to have too much of friction, after the first reassembly. Inking & Writing Inking is easy piston filling and writing is kind of ‘ok’ smooth (not butter), with a rather wet flow. Initially, the ink feathered a little, on a moderate quality paper, but later on it adjusted well once the excess ink was used up.http://s25.postimg.org/hs9j9dl4f/DSC_1082.jpghttp://s25.postimg.org/b0j46iw4v/DSC_1085.jpg RatingsAlong with my own biases*Diamond 580 Feature - Rating (of 10)* Length - 10Capped ~ 14 cmPosted ~ 18 cm Unposted ~ 13 cm Nib Leverage ~ 2.0 cm - Unposted length is comfortable for long sessions Weight - 1028 g (~ 14g body + 14 g cap) - Balancing is good Design - 9Silver Steely Accent(Demonstrator) - Non-slip diamond (polygonal cross-section) design of barrel- Clip is quite innovative- Ease of disassembly & cleaning- Reassembly needs piston seal to be lubricated well else it won’t move Filling System - 9Piston - Ink capacity can be adjusted to be > 2.1 ml- Some play with the piston parts and end cap is required to get used to it Nib - 7Steel nib Balancing Length ~ 2.0 cm - Small Nib compared to the overall volume of the pen- Wet Flow- ‘Ok’ for smoothness Economic Value - 6- Retails in India at ~ INR 5500 ($90) and $ 50 in the US- Available at $70 (usually shipping would be around $20-25 if ordered from TWSBI site) - Should be priced at $50 in India too- A bit steep for a steel nib, when you can get a Pilot CH92 for a little more Accessories - 10- Elegant Packaging – Let’s call it ‘Apple’ packaging for the lack of any other word (iPhones/iPods come in a similar packaging)- 7mm steel TWSBI branded wrench- 1 small bottle of silicone grease for lubricating piston (seal) - Overall a nice set Overall Rating 8.7 / 10
  12. Hello, I'm new to the forum and was wondering if someone could help me verify if my montblanc pen is real. The plastic glows red under light. It has a pin on the cap "GV1084802" has GERMANY on cap, under the clip it says PIX. Their was a rubber seal on the cap(rollerball pen) what concerns me is the box, the pen I bought was a rollerball 75th anniversary, used. The guy I bought it from got it from a pawn shop(he owns it) the box had a black stretchy strip to keep the pen in the case without moving. It came with a montblanc gaurentee, but it wasn't stamped, as well as the warrantee wasn't stamped. Are their any indicators that I received a fake. Thank you so much, in advance.





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