Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'diamine'.

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • FPN Community
    • FPN News
    • Introductions
    • Clubs, Meetings and Events
    • Pay It Forward, Loaner Programs & Group Buys
  • The Market Place
    • The Mall
    • Market Watch
    • Historical Sales Forums
  • Writing Instruments
    • Fountain & Dip Pens - First Stop
    • Fountain Pen Reviews
    • Of Nibs & Tines
    • It Writes, But It Is Not A Fountain Pen ....
    • Pen History
    • Repair Q&A
  • Brand Focus
    • Cross
    • Esterbrook
    • Lamy
    • Mabie Todd Research/Special Interest Forum/Group
    • Montblanc
    • Parker
    • Pelikan
    • Sheaffer
    • TWSBI
    • Wahl-Eversharp
    • Waterman
  • Regional Focus
    • China, Korea and Others (Far East, Asia)
    • Great Britain & Ireland - Europe
    • India & Subcontinent (Asia)
    • Italy - Europe
    • Japan - Asia
    • USA - North America
    • Other Brands - Europe
  • Inks, Inc.
    • Inky Thoughts
    • Ink Reviews
    • Ink Comparisons
    • Co-Razy-Views
    • Th-INKing Outside the Bottle
    • Inky Recipes
  • Paper, and Pen Accessories
    • Paper and Pen Paraphernalia
    • Paper & Pen Paraphernalia Reviews and Articles
  • Creative Expressions
    • Pen Turning and Making
    • Pictures & Pen Photography
    • The Write Stuff
    • Handwriting & Handwriting Improvement
    • Calligraphy Discussions
    • Pointed Pen Calligraphy
    • Broad (or Edged) Pen Calligraphy

Blogs

  • FPN Board Talk
  • Incoherent Ramblings from Murphy Towers
  • The Blogg of Me
  • FPN Admin Column
  • Rules, Guidelines, FAQs, Guides
  • Musings on matters pen
  • Marketing & Sales
  • Iguana Sell Pens Blog
  • Newton Pens' Blog
  • Peyton Street Pens Blog
  • holygrail's Blog
  • A Gift For Words
  • I Don't Have a Name; So This Will Do
  • Karas Kustoms' Blog
  • Debbie Ohi's Inky Journal
  • Sus Minervam docet
  • Crud!
  • Clut and Clutter
  • Federalist Pens

Product Groups

  • FPN Pens
  • FPN Inks
  • FPN Donations
  • Premium/Trading/Retailer Accounts

Categories

  • Fonts
  • Tools & Software
  • Rules for Notepads & Paper

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

  1. yazeh

    Diamine Dark Forest

    Diamine Dark Forest Many thanks @Lithium466 for the sample. 馃檹 This is a dependable dark green/ teal, part of Diamine's 150th anniversary inks It鈥檚 a very well-behaved dark green, especially with a Japanese Ef nib, which was quite pleasant. From M onwards the colour changes from a dark green to a dark teal (shading appears also from M nibs onwards, despite what the scan wants you to believe. And it doesn鈥檛 like copy paper. It's a great ink to do washes, surprisingly creating a teal effect, even though I don't see any blue in the chroma: Writing Samples: My apologies for the misspelling. I must have been thinking of another Forrest I couldn鈥檛 fill the Nib creaper, so it is not a real representative of a flex nib, and finally I stumbled on my Tomoe River notebook (don鈥檛 ask) hence the major smudging, which I believe shows the range of the ink Photo: Comparison: Water test: and finally an art work. As you saw with the quotes, the name of the ink, conjured the Enchanted Wood, by Enid Blyton. This is a rendition of the Magic Farway tree, by my child's mind. Noodler's Polar Brown Sailor Kiwa-guro Octopus White Polar Bear J Herbin 脡clat de Saphir 路 Pens used: Pilot Kakuno Ef, Lamy (EF/F/M/B, BB, 1.1), Nib creaper dipped 路 What I liked: Writing with M/ B nibs. Doing washes. 路 What I did not like: Nothing much. 路 What some might not like: If you use copy paper, it鈥檚 not for you. 路 Shading: M nibs onwards. 路 Ghosting: Yes, on cheap paper. 路 Bleed through: Yes, on cheap paper. 路 Flow Rate: Nice and wet. 路 Lubrication: Generous. 路 Nib Dry-out: Did not notice. 路 Start-up: I had some difficulties when switching nibs. 路 Saturation: Nice and dark. 路 Shading Potential: M /B nibs. 路 Sheen: Did not notice. 路 Spread / Feathering / Woolly Line: Did not notice. 路 Nib Creep / 鈥淐rud鈥: Did not notice. 路 Staining (pen): No. 路 Clogging: Did not notice. 路 Cleaning: Easy 路 Water resistance: Inexistant. 路 Availability: 40 ml bottles / Cartridges Please don't hesitate to share your experience, writing samples or any other comments. The more the merrier
  2. visvamitra

    Graphite - Diamine

    Manufacturers since 1864, Diamine Inks relocated to this purpose built 'state of the art' factory in Liverpool in 1925, where they successfully carried on using the traditional methods and formulas for ink production. Over the years the company has changed hands and are now located close to the world famous Aintree Race Course http://www.diamineinks.co.uk/images/DimaineFactory.gif http://www.diaminein...uk/AboutUs.aspx I'm still looking for perfect grey ink. Caran d'Ache Infinite Grey is close, the hue is stunning but the ink is average in terms of behavior. Diamine Graphite is definitely less expensive and it has this slate hue that I enjoy a lot in grey inks. The behavior is good, the ink flows smoothly and leaves reasonably wet line. In one pen (Pelikan M805) it caused hard start after doing a pause of 30 seconds. In other pens however it writes really well. I think it's undesrvedly underrated Diamine ink. I really enjoy this one although I still believe one of these days I'll discover perfect grey ink Drops of ink on kitchen towel Software ID Color range Tomoe River - Kaweco Classic Sport, broad nib Tomoe River, Pelikan M805, fine nib Leuchtturm 1917 - Kaweco AL Sport, broad nib Linen paper, Kaweco Classic Sport, broad nib Copy paper, Lamy Al-Star, broad nib No-name notebook, Lamy Al-Star, medium nib
  3. Diamine Majestic Blue vs De Atramentis Steel Blue An Ink comparison for a somewhat peculiar reason Notice Diamine and De Atramentis use similar lids There is of course nothing so special about comparing two inks especially then they are both blue inks. What is peculiar though that they are both very talented at smudging and staining. But I will come back to this later first have a look at the colours. I will enter in the links to the more extensive reviews of both inks at the end of this review Handwritten text comparison Let me "throw up" another comparison Q-Tipp comparison Sheeny Shiny happy Inks yeah How great both inks sheen The De Atramentis Ink sheen very well but is topped by Sheen Master Majestic Blue Judge Smudge Down here is the reason that gave me the idea for this comparison Both inks smear even after days of drying time. Just a drop of spit on the finger tip can cause this smudging It seems to be quite normal though, some inks tend to smudge alittle more, they are no IG or document inks after all In this comparisonThe Diamine seems to be the most talented when it cooms to smudging smudging. I once had Dr. J of De Atramentis test the Diamine Majestic Blue. Dr J Lsaid that the ink was perfetly well... He liked it a lot! Availability La Couronne du Comte I guess Dennis and Rik would even travel to the moon to get it for you (just pay them a million or 2) Well it is safe to say that they do almost everything to satisfy their customers鈥 Considering http://www.lacouronneducomte Bankers have Rothshield Ink lovers have the Goulet Pen Company. Rachel and Brian carry the almost* largest assortment of ink on earth an it's near surroundings http://www.gouletpens.com (*almost Dear Amberlea Davis carries the largest assortment in the universe but is not a seller Larry Post of Australia is a Great Supplier of Stationary and Artist Equipments. They carry a lot of De Atramentis Inks http://www.larrypost.com.au/ The same applies to Singapore based Arters of the utterly friendly Yitpeng and WeetekOng http://arters.com.sg Conclusion I really do like both inks. They both are lovely blues. Normally I am not so fond of blue inks because they are so standard that i believe that they are mor sommething for boring biro writers these inksmade me change my mind and I now use blue inks quite often The Diamine is the better sheener therefore the De Atramentis seems to " hold his liquor" better https://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/topic/352616-diamine-majestic-blue/ https://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/topic/352615-de-atramentis-steel-blue/
  4. When I tried Diamine Eclipse the first time, I just loved the color. It was such a unique blackish purple. And it seemed to work pretty well in my pens. So I started using it in one of my daily carries. Well, I've been using it for about six months now, and, while it certainly isn't the type of ink that would ruin a pen or anything like that, I just have gotten so I don't love the way it flows. In comparison to waterman or iroshizuku, it seems relatively 'dry' to me. And, well, I'm tired of it. But I still love the color. Has anyone come across another ink with a similar color?
  5. I cut a 5 cm strip of each of the Diamine writing samples from the previous post and left them in the window for three days. This is not Amberlea's massive fade test: I simply left the sheets in the window for three days. The window faces due west, not south. In England. In August. They may have gotten nine hours of direct sunlight. This is not meant to be a stress test; this is forgetting your notebook in the office window over the weekend. The sort of thing you might do. Below are the samples on Rhodia paper with the 5 cm strip pasted in with a blue border. Clearly, if you think this is a realistic test and it applies to you, then there are a dozen or so inks that are going to be problematic, including Amazing Amethyst (sort of survives)Imperial BlueMajestic Purple (still readable, but not purple)Lavender (colour change)Imperial PurpleHope Pink (almost completely gone!)Cerise (ditto!)Flamingo PinkPink (gone)Pumpkin (still readable, but different colour)CoralOchre (survives)Orange (almost gone)Peach Haze (gone)The results on the cartridge paper are at first glance similar and I will try to prepare the files later. I hope this is useful. Comments and suggestions are most welcome.
  6. Diamine Blood Orange (150th Anniversary II) The ink maker from Liverpool is one of the staple brands in ink-land. They consistently produce solid inks for a very reasonable price. In 2017, Diamine released their second ink series to commemorate their 150th Anniversary. I obtained my set shortly thereafter, but more or less forgot about them when my attention drifted to Japanese inks. About time to finish the reviews. Fortunately, these anniversary inks are still easily obtainable, so if you like what you see you can still get them. Blood Orange is a nicely saturated dark red that looks quite lovely. It鈥檚 muted and subdued, not a screaming red that jumps from the page. Quite suited for marking up papers, or correcting a pupil鈥檚 homework 鈥 it won鈥檛 scream 鈥淵ou made a mistake!鈥, but is more subtle 鈥淟ook, this is not what I expected鈥 here a some pointers to learn more about the topic, and to improve your test next time.鈥 With this ink, it鈥檚 definitely the fruit that is referred to, no orange colour that I can see in this ink. Diamine might just as well have called it Vampire Juice. As we are used to from Diamine, the ink performs well, and writes a saturated line in all nib sizes. Shading is present with M nibs and above, but fairly unobtrusive 鈥 there is not a lot of contrast between the light and darker parts. The ink itself is on the wet side: combine it with wet pens, and you get a deeply saturated red-black line that accentuates the shading. I simply love the way my Yard-o-Led with F-nib makes the most of this Diamine ink 鈥 see the nib-size sample below. Blood Orange plays well with both white and cream paper. Personally, I like it a touch better with the yellow papers in my test set鈥 they soften up the ink a bit more. The ink easily handles low-quality paper, with only a tiny amount of feathering on Moleskine. Expect some show-through and even a little bit of bleed-through 鈥 not a lot, but too much to use low-quality paper on both sides. To illustrate the colour span of Blood Orange, I did a swab on 52 gsm Tomoe River paper where I really saturated portions of the paper with ink. Blood Orange has a fairly narrow colour span, with not much contrast between the light and darker parts. This translates to soft shading when writing. Shading is definitely there (starting with M nibs and above) but remains fairly unobtrusive. Just enough to accentuate that you鈥檙e writing with a fountain pen. On the smudge test 鈥 rubbing text with a moist Q-tip cotton swab 鈥 the ink showed only a limited amount of smearing, with the written word remaining crisp and clear. Water resistance is totally absent 鈥 most colour disappears from the page, leaving only some red-purple smudges. Not an ink to use if water-resistance is high on your list. This is also evident from the bottom part of the chromatography. I鈥檝e tested the ink on a wide variety of paper 鈥 from crappy Moleskine to high-end Tomoe River. On each scrap of paper I show you: An ink swab, made with a cotton Q-tip 1-2-3 pass swab, to show increasing saturation An ink scribble made with a Lamy Safari M-nib fountain pen The name of the paper used, written with a Lamy Safari B-nib A small text sample, written with the Lamy Safari M-nib Source of the quote, written with a wet F-nib Yard-o-Led Drying times of the ink on the paper (with the M-nib Safari) The multi-paper writing test shows that Blood Orange handles all papers well, looking good on both white and cream paper. There is a small amount of feathering on the worst-quality paper (Moleskine), but nothing really extreme. With cheap paper, you do get a lot of see-through and some bleed-through, making it nigh impossible to use the backside of the paper. Drying times with the Lamy Safari M-nib varied widely, depending on the absorption characteristics of the paper (from 5 seconds on absorbent paper, to more than 20 seconds on hard Japanese paper). Because scans don't always capture an ink's colour and contrast with good precision, I also add a photo to give you an alternative look on this Diamine ink. To my eye, both scan and photo capture the colour quite well. Writing with different nib sizes The picture below shows the effect of nib sizes on the writing (written on Rhodia N掳16 80 gsm paper). All samples were written with a Lamy Safari. I also added a couple of visiting pens: a Pelikan M600 with M-nib, and my wet Yard-o-Led with F-nib. Blood Orange looks good in all pens, but really shines in the wet F-nib on the Yard-o-Led with some awesome-looking shading that looks almost 3-dimensional. Related inks To compare Diamine Blood Orange with related inks, I use my nine-grid format with the currently reviewed ink at the center. This format shows the name of related inks, a saturation sample, a 1-2-3 swab and a water resistance test 鈥 all in a very compact format. Blood Orange looks like a slightly darker version of TACCIA benitsuchi. Oh 鈥 and by the way 鈥 while writing this review I noticed that I selected benitsuchi twice (apparently I had two sample cards of this ink, and I just selected on colour without paying attention to the ink names). Inkxperiment 鈥 Jack the Ripper As a personal challenge, I try to create interesting drawings using only the ink I鈥檓 reviewing. I consider this a fun extension of the hobby, and these single-ink drawings are great for exploring the colour-range nuances that are present in the ink. I love doing them! Inspiration for this drawing comes from the book 鈥淎 Sympony of Echoes鈥 by Jodi Taylor (one of the books in the Chronicles of St Mary鈥檚 series 鈥 highly recommended for a light and enjoyable read). The book chronicles the adventures of a group of time-traveling historians documenting major events in our history. In this novel, our historians travel to London of 1888, where they have a nasty encounter with a wraith-like Jack the Ripper. I tried to capture this particular moment in my drawing. I started with an A4 piece of HP photo paper to which I added a background of squares representing the city blocks and winding streets of London. I then added some city elements (Big Ben and city lights) to set the scene and painted in our brave historians. I then used a fine brush to add the wraith-like figure of Jack the Ripper, roaming the streets in London鈥檚 Whitechapel district, ready to slay and maim his victims. I got carried away a bit while drawing the figure of Jack the Ripper resulting in too much clutter in the drawing. But still, you get a good feeling of what can be achieved with this Diamine ink in a more artsy context. For a red ink, there鈥檚 quite some potential there. Inkxpired 鈥 computational art I love experimenting with pen/ink/paper, and have added another layer as part of the hobby. I鈥檓 exploring computational art, inspired by the ink drawings I do during ink reviews. Another fun offshoot of the hobby鈥 and all that starting with a few drops of dye-coloured water on paper. Starting from the original drawing, I did a square cut-out and converted the drawing to black-and-white. Next I used a negative filter with gives a more ghost-like Jack the Ripper. I finally used an art filter to add some colour, and applied a radial blur filter that centered on the killer鈥檚 victim. Conclusion Diamine Blood Orange is a good-looking dark red 鈥 muted and with lots of character. What makes this ink stand out for me is the way it looks in my wet F-nib Yard-o-Led 鈥 simply amazing: an almost red-black with tons of shading and a 3-dimensional feel. The ink works well with both white and cream paper, and writes wet and well-saturated in all nib sizes. I enjoyed experimenting with it 鈥 both for writing and drawing - and can definitely recommend it if you like dark red inks. Technical test results on Rhodia N掳 16 notepad paper, written with Lamy Safari, M-nib Backside of writing samples on different paper types
  7. I'm looking to buy about 5-10 30ml Diamines bottles quite soon (Monday, but can be throughout the week) and was wondering which inks you all like and would recommend, colorwise. Inks that make you happy, left you pleasantly surprised, or you felt lived up to their good rep. I'm not particular about wetness, drying time, or feathering. Colorwise, I love blues, purples, yellow greens, maroons, deep greens, deep oranges, nickel azo types, and muted grayish colors. I tend to ignore oranges unless they shade, and my one yellow is enough for me. In terms of Diamine ink, I've got the overseas exclusives, Poppy red (which is enough for me in terms of vibrant non red-violet reds.) Magestic Blue, Oxford Blue, Sargasso Sea, Chocolate Brown. I'm already getting - Bilberry - Flamingo Pink - Oxblood - Tobacco Sunburst - Ancient Copper (considering) - Kung te Chung (considering) If you've got something you'd absolutely recommend, please tell me ASAP!
  8. visvamitra

    Diamine Grey

    Manufacturers since 1864, Diamine Inks relocated to this purpose built 'state of the art' factory in Liverpool in 1925, where they successfully carried on using the traditional methods and formulas for ink production. Over the years the company has changed hands and are now located close to the world famous Aintree Race Course http://www.diamineinks.co.uk/images/DimaineFactory.gif Diamine Grey is, in my eyes, one of the best choices for people who would luike to try grey ink. It's dependable, easily obtainable and cheap. It behaves really well on most papers (almost no feathering on crappiest paper - Moleskine) and remains legible. It has some interesting shading going on. As the ink dries (it happens quickly) the color lightens but the dark shadows remain visible. Usually where the ink pools at the end of a line. While it's neutral grey I wouldn't call it flat. It's rather enjoyable ink. Drops of ink on kitchen towel Software ID Color range Tomoe River, Caran d'Ache, broad nib Leuchtturm 1917 - Kaweco AL Sport, broad nib Moleskine, Caran d'Ache, broad nib No-name notebook manager, Kaweco Classic Sport, B Water resistance
  9. Diamine Golden Honey (150th Anniversary II) The ink maker from Liverpool is one of the staple brands in ink-land. They consistently produce solid inks for a very reasonable price. In 2017, Diamine released the second ink series to commemorate their 150th Anniversary. I obtained my set shortly thereafter, but more or less forgot about them when my attention drifted to Japanese inks. About time to do the reviews. Fortunately, these anniversary inks are still easily obtainable, so if you like what you see you can still get them. Golden Honey has a name that fits the colour: a really nice yellow-orange that looks great on paper. Beware that you need to choose your pens/nibs wisely: the ink鈥檚 lubrication is fairly bad in dry writers with finer nibs. But that鈥檚 easily solved using a wet pen or a broader nib 鈥 in my case, the ink is a perfect match for my Pelikan M600 Vibrant Orange with F-nib. Shading becomes really prominent in M-nibs and above, but with really broad stubs it鈥檚 a bit too much for me. For me, the ink works best with M-B-1.1 nibs, where it presents its best side. The ink writes nicely wet (but beware of that lubrication issue in fine-nibbed dry pens), and leaves a well-saturated line, even with the EF nib. The colour is definitely an orange, but leaning to yellow in low-saturated parts. Colourwise, it鈥檚 almost an exact match for Papier Plume Sazerac, but in a one-on-one fight this Diamine Golden Honey turns out to be the better ink. The ink works well with both white and cream paper, but the white papers do enhance the looks of the ink鈥檚 beautiful shading. With low-quality paper, there鈥檚 a tiny bit of feathering and you can expect a fair amount of show-through and bleed-through. To illustrate the colour span of Golden Honey, I did a swab on 52 gsm Tomoe River paper, where I really saturated portions of the paper with ink. Golden Honey has a broad dynamic range, evolving from a wispy almost yellow to a nicely saturated orange. This translates to strong shading when writing, but because the contrast between light and dark parts is nicely balanced, the shading never becomes too harsh. Nice! On the smudge test 鈥 rubbing text with a moist Q-tip cotton swab 鈥 the ink showed some 鈥 mostly yellow 鈥 smearing, but the text itself remains crips and clear. Water resistance is totally absent 鈥 some residue is left on the page, and with some detective work you might be able to reconstruct your writing (but don鈥檛 depend on it). Looking at the bottom part of the chromatography, I had expected better water resistance - but no. I鈥檝e tested the ink on a wide variety of paper 鈥 from crappy Moleskine to high-end Tomoe River. On each scrap of paper I show you: An ink swab, made with a cotton Q-tip 1-2-3 pass swab, to show increasing saturation An ink scribble made with a Lamy Safari M-nib fountain pen The name of the paper used, written with a Lamy Safari B-nib A small text sample, written with the Lamy Safari M-nib Source of the quote, written with an F-nib Pelikan M600 Drying times of the ink on the paper (with the M-nib Safari) The multi-paper writing test shows that Golden Honey handles most papers well, looking good on both white and cream paper. There is a small amount of feathering on low-quality paper, but nothing really extreme. With cheap paper, you do get a lot of see-through and some bleed-through, making it nigh impossible to use the backside of the paper. Drying times were about 5 seconds on absorbent paper, and about 15 seconds on most other papers (with my M-nib Lamy Safari). Because scans don't always capture an ink's colour and contrast with good precision, I also add a photo to give you an alternative look on this Diamine ink. To my eye, both scan and photo capture the colour well, but the scans definitely exaggerate the shading (too much contrast between the light and dark parts). Writing with different nib sizes The picture below shows the effect of nib sizes on the writing (written on Rhodia N掳16 80 gsm paper). All samples were written with a Lamy Safari. I also added a couple of visiting pens: a Pelikan M600 with F-nib, and an Esterbrook Estie with Journaler nib. Golden Honey looks definitely better in the wetter-writing visiting pens. My Pelikan M600 Vibrant Orange with F-nib captures its sweet spot: nicely saturated and just the right amount of shading. Related inks To compare Diamine Golden Honey with related inks, I use my nine-grid format with the currently reviewed ink at the center. This format shows the name of related inks, a saturation sample, a 1-2-3 swab and a water resistance test 鈥 all in a very compact format. Papier Plume Sazerac is almost identical, and Super 5 Delhi Orange comes close (and has the advantage of being waterproof). Inkxperiment 鈥 The Doors of Eden As a personal challenge, I try to create interesting drawings using only the ink I鈥檓 reviewing. I find this to be a fun extension of the hobby, and these single-ink drawings are great for exploring the colour-range nuances that are present in the ink. I love doing them! Inspiration for this drawing comes from Adrian Tchaikovsky鈥檚 鈥淭he Doors of Eden鈥 鈥 an SF masterpiece that explores the concept of parallel Earths. In each world, evolution took a slightly different path, with species other than homo sapiens coming out as top predator. And now these worlds are touching and merging鈥 which shouldn鈥檛 happen and threatens the fabric of existence. I started with an A4 piece of watercolour paper that I divided in panels representing the parallel worlds. Each section gets a mini drawing, identical in theme but slightly different 鈥 referring to the diverging paths evolution took on these worlds. Our own Earth gets slightly bigger panes. The painting builds up from heavily water-diluted Golden Honey, and then adds layers with more and more ink added to the mix. Final details were made with a fountain pen and pure Golden Honey. The resulting drawing shows the broad range of tones that can be extracted from this Diamine ink 鈥 simply great! You might also notice that on the absorbent watercolour paper, the colour in the panels gets a fairly one-dimensional, almost cartoony look. Overall, I really like this Golden Honey for this artsy type of activity. Inkxpired 鈥 computational art I love experimenting with pen/ink/paper, and have added another layer as part of the hobby. I鈥檓 exploring computational art, inspired by the ink drawings I do during ink reviews. Another fun offshoot of the hobby鈥 and all that starting with a few drops of dye-coloured water on paper. Starting from the original 鈥淭he Doors of Eden鈥 drawing, I first converted it to a black-and-white picture with exaggerated contrast. I then applied an 鈥渙ld photo鈥 filter, and added a sepia-toned gradient to the result. Finally, I used a 鈥減ixel sort鈥 filter to blur the boundaries between the different worlds. Conclusion Diamine Golden Honey is a lovely-looking yellow-orange, that I can recommend for both writing and painting. A happy colour, that is the perfect match for my Pelikan M600 Vibrant Orange with F-nib. Just be aware that it doesn鈥檛 like dry writers, and you鈥檒l be good. If you enjoy orange inks, this one is most certainly a must-have. Technical test results on Rhodia N掳 16 notepad paper, written with Lamy Safari, M-nib Backside of writing samples on different paper types
  10. essayfaire

    Ink and plant pairings

    The very first orchid I ever received, which I have managed to rebloom a few times, is having a banner year. I am so happy that I wanted to pair it with a sample of Diamine Shimmering Frosted Orchid, as I think that is almost spot on one of the colors in the blooms, but there was too little remaining in my sample bottle. I came up with this Vinta instead:
  11. Audrey T

    Light, bright greens

    Robert Oster's Fizzy Lime vs. Diamine's Neon Lime:
  12. visvamitra

    Amazing Amethyst - Diamine

    Manufacturers since 1864, Diamine Inks relocated to this purpose built 'state of the art' factory in Liverpool in 1925, where they successfully carried on using the traditional methods and formulas for ink production. Over the years the company has changed hands and are now located close to the world famous Aintree Race Course http://www.diamineinks.co.uk/images/DimaineFactory.gif Amazing Amethyst is somewhere between violet and purple. It is muted, but quite rich in the right nib. It shades in nicely鈥 from medium pale to very dark violet-purple. This ink isn't very wet but the flow in most pens is enjoyable. Shading is rich. Behavior is proper. Drops of ink on kitchen towel Software ID Color range No name notebook - Mopntblanc 342, flexy nib Leuchtturm 1917 - Kaweco AL Sport, broad nib
  13. Diamine Tudor Blue (150th Anniversary II) The ink maker from Liverpool is one of the staple brands in ink-land. They consistently produce solid inks for a very reasonable price. In 2017, Diamine released a second ink series to commemorate their 150th Anniversary. I obtained my set shortly thereafter, but more or less forgot about them when my attention drifted to Japanese inks. About time to do the reviews. Fortunately, these anniversary inks are still easily obtainable, so if you like what you see you can still get them. At first sight, this Diamine ink looks like a fairly classic Royal Blue. On second sight, it definitely is a bit softer and darker, with a hint of purple undertones. For my personal taste though, it is too close to a standard blue to pique my interest. But it still is a solid performer, and a worthwhile workhorse ink. As can be expected from Diamine, the ink performs well, and writes a saturated line in all nib sizes. With F-nibs and above a fairly pronounced shading makes its appearance. Not too bad. The ink itself is fairly saturated. It can get quite a dark shade of blue when using wet pens. Also, wet pens tend to drown out the shading in this ink. I like it best in my drier pens 鈥 really nice in the Lamy Safari with 1.1 nib. Tudor Blue prefers good quality paper. On print/copy paper, I noticed a tiny bit of feathering (especially with a wet pen), and a fair amount of show-through and little points of bleed-through. Not an ink for the cheap copy paper in the workplace. To illustrate the colour span of this Diamine ink, I did a swab on 52 gsm Tomoe River paper, where I really saturated portions of the paper with ink. Tudor Blue has a rather low dynamic range, and quickly saturates. Dry pens tend to match with the left part of the saturation range 鈥 and you will get nice and soft shading. Wet pens match with the right side: here the ink is really saturated, with little difference between light and dark parts. So don鈥檛 expect much in the shading department with wet writers. On the smudge test 鈥 rubbing text with a moist Q-tip cotton swab 鈥 the ink behaved well. There is smearing, but the text itself remains crips and clear. Water resistance is non-existent though. All the blue dyes quickly disappear, leaving only some red-purple smudges behind. This can easily be deduced from the bottom part of the chromatography below - almost no ink remains in place. I鈥檝e tested the ink on a wide variety of paper 鈥 from crappy Moleskine to high-end Tomoe River. On each scrap of paper I show you: An ink swab, made with a cotton Q-tip 1-2-3 pass swab, to show increasing saturation An ink scribble made with a Lamy Safari M-nib fountain pen The name of the paper used, written with a Lamy Safari B-nib A small text sample, written with the Lamy Safari M-nib Source of the quote, written with an Edison Collier 1.1 stub Drying times of the ink on the paper (with the M-nib Safari) The multi-paper writing test shows Tudor Blue鈥檚 preference for good quality paper. With cheaper copy/print paper there is a tiny bit of feathering, and you also get lots of see-through and bits of bleed-through. It鈥檚 best to use this ink with high quality hard-surface paper 鈥 that鈥檚 the paper eco-system that it prefers. In my opinion, this is a white-paper ink. On cream paper it looks a bit sickly 鈥 the yellow shining through doesn鈥檛 combine well with the blue tones of the ink. Drying times for this ink are mostly in the 5-10 second range with a Lamy Safari M-nib. Because scans don't always capture an ink's colour and contrast with good precision, I also add a photo to give you an alternative look on this Diamine ink. In this case, the phote gives the closest match. The scans show too bright a blue, but still give you a good feel of the differences in behaviour across multiple types of paper. Writing with different nib sizes The picture below shows the effect of nib sizes on the writing (written on Rhodia N掳16 80 gsm paper). All samples were written with a Lamy Safari. I also added a couple of visiting pens: a Pelikan M120 with M-nib, and an Edison Collier with 1.1. stub. I personally like this Tudor Blue best with the dry-writing Safari pens. Related inks To compare Diamine Tudor Blue with related inks, I use my nine-grid format with the currently reviewed ink at the center. This format shows the name of related inks, a saturation sample, a 1-2-3 swab and a water resistance test 鈥 all in a very compact format. The ink is fairly similar to others in the grid 鈥 if you already have a blue in this range, there鈥檚 really no need to acquire this one. Inkxperiment 鈥 Singin' in the Rain As a personal challenge, I always try to draw an interesting little painting using only the ink I鈥檓 reviewing. This part of the review literally guarantees a moment of joy and creative challenge 鈥 I simply love exploring inks this way. A little while before doing this review I had a song that got stuck in my head. Everyone knows that silly tune from the 1952 musical 鈥淪ingin鈥 in the Rain鈥, with Gene Kelly dancing through puddles on the street. I have no idea how that tune wormed its way into my head, but it definitely was annoying 鈥 a real earworm. Anyway鈥 my inspiration for this inkxperiment is obvious now. I started with an A4 piece of HP photo paper. I taped out the tree trunk with washi tape, and then used a sponge with water-diluted ink to draw in the background. Next I used a paintbrush to add the cloud and rain puddles on the ground. I then used the rough end of a kitchen sponge to stamp in the foliage on the tree. After removing the washi tape, I used a plastic card with pure Tudor Blue to draw the tree trunk. The mother and child were drawn in using my B-nib Safari. To finish the painting, I used a toothpick dipped in ink to draw the raindrops. The resulting drawing is not too bad composition-wise, but Tudor Blue did not really succeed to bring the drawing to life鈥 there is not enough contrast, which makes the drawing a bit flat-looking. On the positive side, this little picture shows what can be achieved with this Diamine ink in a more artistic context (not much, I鈥檓 afraid 馃槈 Inkxpired 鈥 computational art I love experimenting with pen/ink/paper, and have added another layer as part of the hobby. I鈥檓 exploring computational art, inspired by the ink drawings I do during ink reviews. Another fun offshoot of the hobby鈥 and all that starting with a few drops of dye-coloured water on paper. I first used Irfanview with its Metallic Ice filter to create more or less a negative of the original drawing. Next, I used a PicsArt color filter to extend the colour range. A Photoleap Urban Art filter added the red & yellow tones 鈥 but I kept the blue in the umbrellas and tree trunk. I finally retouched the little girl to add more yellow to her dress. I like the thunderstorm atmosphere of the end result and the final colour palette that works quite well. Conclusion Diamine Tudor Blue is a fairly standard blue 鈥 a bit softer and darker than your run-of-the-mill royal blue. Not an exciting ink colour 鈥 my opinion of course. Not a bad ink, but also not a must-have. If you have other blues that are close, there鈥檚 no real reason to obtain this one. Technical test results on Rhodia N掳 16 notepad paper, written with Lamy Safari, M-nib Backside of writing samples on different paper types
  14. There are currently (August 2013) one hundred colours available in the standard series from Diamine. Below I have written one line with each colour first on low-absorbent paper (Rhodia No 18 dotpad) and second on normal absorbent paper (our corporate printer鈥檚 stock 鈥渃artridge鈥 paper). All lines are written with a medium Lamy Z50 nib on a Lamy Safari pen. Apologies for the corporate branding: I do not have blank cartridge stock paper. I hope it does not distract too much from the inks. If you want to calibrate your monitor, the blue and orange colours in the logo are Pantone Blue 072 and Pantone 1375, respectively. There are 25 colours on each sheet so 4 sheets in total. I will write more about the sorting of the ink colours later. For now: enjoy! and I hope this is useful. (And if someone wants to send me samples of the special edition Diamine inks that I do not have, then I will be happy to add them. This is mainly the Music set.) Colour set 1 Low-absorbent paper (Rhodia) Normal absorbent paper (cartridge)
  15. From the album: Some of Mercian鈥檚 inks

    A photo of the scrawl in my ink-testing book. This is a comparison of Diamine Chocolate Brown (top) with Waterman Havana (nowadays sold as Absolute Brown) underneath. At the bottom of the frame is some text in Parker Penman Mocha. My intent in this photo is to illustrate how 鈥榤aroon鈥 the Havana appears to be.

    • 0 B
    • x
  16. visvamitra

    Diamine Tyrian Purple

    Manufacturers since 1864, Diamine Inks relocated to this purpose built 'state of the art' factory in Liverpool in 1925, where they successfully carried on using the traditional methods and formulas for ink production. Over the years the company has changed hands and are now located close to the world famous Aintree Race Course http://www.diamineinks.co.uk/images/DimaineFactory.gif http://www.diaminein...uk/AboutUs.aspx Tyrian Purple is named after a reddish-purple dye made in Tyre, Phoenicia, from sea snails. Huge numbers of snails were collected and boiled in lead vats. The dye was meant to mimic clotted blood, and it was available mainly to the rich. I used to like this ink but nowadays, I don't think it's particularly good. It lacks saturation. It feels dryish in certain pens. Sure, drying time is reasonable and it doesn't clog the pen. Drops of ink on kitchen towel Software ID Color range Leuchtturm 1917 - Kaweco AL Sport, medium nib Tomoe River - Kaweco AL Sport, broad nib Herlitz, Hero 5028, stub 1.9
  17. Ink Review : Diamine Silver Fox (150th Anniversary Ink) Pen: Lamy Logo, F-nib Paper: Rhodia N掳16 notepad 80 gsm Review This ink is part of the 8-ink collection that Diamine released to celebrate their 150th anniversary (1864-2014). The set has a number of very interesting colors, and this is one of the better inks in this collection. Silver Fox... the name evokes the image of a snow-covered pine forest at sunrise. A black and white painting: white snow in the clearing, the almost black silhouette of the pine trees, dirty-grey snow on the forest floor. All is quiet... then movement... a shy silver fox silently appears, blending in with the landscape. The fox's fur providing perfect camouflage, with specs of white, light and dark grey, to almost black. A blink of the eye, and the stealthy canine has disappeared. All is quiet again... only paw-prints in the snow remain. This ink perfectly captures the above setting. A lovely grey with great shading properties, that covers the gamut from very light to almost black-grey tones. This is a pure grey with no colored undertones, as shown in the chromatography. A very satisfying ink with good flow and fabulous shading - even with the finer nibs. You might think that grey is dull - but not in this case ! This ink is like the playful fox... a joy to write with, and with a very eye-pleasing result on the paper. This ink is at home with all types of writing - from intimate love-letter to formal business letter. This Silver Fox adapts very nicely... I'm really fond of it. OK - but how does it behave on paper ? For this, I did some tests: Rhodia N掳16 notepad 80 gsm - drying time ~35 seconds, no feathering, no show-through and no bleed-throughPaperblanks journal paper - drying time 15-20 seconds, no feathering, no show-through, no bleed-throughGeneric notepad paper 70 gsm - drying time ~20 seconds, no feathering, minimal show-through, no bleed-throughMoleskine journal - drying time ~10 seconds, no feathering, noticeable show-through but no bleed-through (with my fine nib)This is a very well-behaving ink, even on cheap paper like that of a Moleskine journal. Drying times on fountain-pen-friendly paper are on the long side, but this hasn't really bothered me. Water resistance is surprisingly good. Even with 30 seconds under running tap water, a perfectly legible light-grey text remains. All-in-all, a top-notch ink. Conclusion Silver Fox is definitely a crown-jewel in the 150th Anniversary ink collection. It is a very well-behaving ink with a beautiful grey color. And that shading... it's just phenomenal ! Excellent work from Diamine. my overall score: A+
  18. Diamine Espresso (150th Anniversary II) The ink maker from Liverpool is one of the staple brands in ink-land. They consistently produce solid inks for a very reasonable price. In 2017, Diamine released their second ink series to commemorate their 150th Anniversary. I obtained my set shortly thereafter, but more or less forgot about them when my attention drifted to Japanese inks. About time to do the reviews. Fortunately, these anniversary inks are still easily obtainable, so if you like what you see you can still get them. The ink鈥檚 name was well chosen 鈥 Diamine Espresso is a fairly dark cool brown, definitely not a latt茅. Espresso can handle all types of papers and all nib sizes equally well. Good flow and lubrication 鈥 in that respect a typical Diamine ink. Being a dark brown, the ink shows good contrast even with the extra-fine nibs. It also looks quite serious and businesslike, which makes it a perfect choice for use at the office. Nothing exceptional, but more of an all-round workhorse that you can depend on. The ink itself is on the wet side: combine it with wet pens, and you get a deeply saturated line of very dark 鈥 almost black - brown. With dry pens, lighter brown tones appear, and you also get that subtle shading that gives some extra punch to your writing. Personally, I prefer this Espresso in combination with a dry pen 鈥 it just looks better. Espresso can handle all types of paper, even the lower quality ones. That鈥檚 a good thing for use at the office, where you usually need to cope with that lower-quality copy & printing paper. To illustrate the colour span of this Diamine ink, I did a swab on 52 gsm Tomoe River paper, where I really saturated portions of the paper with ink. Espresso has a fairly small colour span, with low contrast between the light and darker parts. This translates to soft shading when writing with dry pens. With wet pens, the increased saturation means that you lose most of the shading 鈥 there is just not enough distinction left between light & dark parts on the strokes. On the smudge test 鈥 rubbing text with a moist Q-tip cotton swab 鈥 the ink behaved well. There is smearing, but the text itself remains crips and clear. Water resistance is only so-so: most of the dyes disappear, but a faint-brown ghost image of your original writing remains, which is still readable with some effort. I鈥檝e tested the ink on a wide variety of paper 鈥 from crappy Moleskine to high-end Tomoe River. On each scrap of paper I show you: An ink swab, made with a cotton Q-tip 1-2-3 pass swab, to show increasing saturation An ink scribble made with a Lamy Safari M-nib fountain pen The name of the paper used, written with a Lamy Safari B-nib A small text sample, written with the Lamy Safari M-nib Source of the quote, written with a wet Gazing Far tm2 pen with M-nib Drying times of the ink on the paper (with the M-nib Safari) The multi-paper writing test shows that Diamine Espresso interacts well with all paper types. It鈥檚 surprisingly good with crappy paper 鈥 like Moleskine 鈥 with only minimal feathering, and just a tiny amount of bleed-through. Use it with a fine-nib EDC pen (like a Kaweco), and you鈥檝e got a great office ink. Drying times are mostly in the 10-15 second range, with some increases to 25 seconds on very hard-surfaced paper (like the Tomoe River and Kobeha GRAPHILO). Because scans don't always capture an ink's colour and contrast with good precision, I also add a photo to give you an alternative look on this Diamine ink. In this case, both scan & photo capture the ink well. The photo seems to give the best colour indication. Writing with different nib sizes The picture below shows the effect of nib sizes on the writing (written on Rhodia N掳16 80 gsm paper). All samples were written with a Lamy Safari. I also added a couple of visiting pens: a TWSBI Micarta v2 with F-nib, and a Pelikan M800 with F-nib. As you can see: not much shading going on. It鈥檚 mostly with the calligraphy nibs that the whole saturation spectrum is used, ranging from light to dark brown, with some expressive shading as the result. Related inks To compare Diamine Espresso with related inks, I use my nine-grid format with the currently reviewed ink at the center. This format shows the name of related inks, a saturation sample, a 1-2-3 swab and a water resistance test 鈥 all in a very compact format. Espresso manages to look different from my other browns of the same style. It sits somewhere between iroshizuku yama-guru (more gray) and Pelikan Edelstein Smoky Quartz (more yellow). Inkxperiment 鈥 a Day at the Races As a personal challenge, I try to create interesting drawings using only the ink I鈥檓 reviewing. For me, that鈥檚 where the fun starts: I really like playing and experimenting with my inks in a more creative context. These little one-ink drawings are always a great way to push my creativity. I love doing them! A major news event this week was the passing away of Queen Elizabeth of England. During her life, she got to experience the rapid technological progress of the past century. Which, if you think about it, has been truly amazing. Elizabeth also loved her horses, and especially the Royal Ascot Races. A horse race drawing would have been awesome, but that鈥檚 beyond my capabilities. But cars I can draw, so that鈥檚 what you鈥檒l get. I started with an A4 piece of 300 gsm watercoulor paper. I penciled in the outlines of the drawing, and used water diluted ink for the background. I then used Q-tips and multiple water-ink ratios to draw the grandstand, and added the audience with my fountain pen. Finally I used a piece of cardboard dipped in pure Espresso to draw the checkered flag pattern. Final touches to the drawing were done with my B-nib Lamy Safari. Espresso worked better than expected in this more artistic context. I had not expected that much variation in contrast, but with some water added you can coax a lot of brown tones from this Diamine ink. Inkxpired 鈥 computational art I love experimenting with pen/ink/paper, and have added another layer as part of the hobby. I鈥檓 exploring computational art, inspired by the ink drawings I do during ink reviews. Another fun offshoot of the hobby鈥 and all that starting with a few drops of dye-coloured water on paper. Starting from the car race inkxperiment, I cropped the drawing to a square form, and applied a filter that adds some green/red tones to the drawing. The resulting colours work well for this racing theme, and the result is a bit more expressive than the original inkxperiment. Conclusion Diamine Espresso is a saturated cool & dark brown, that works well with all nib sizes and with all types of papers. Not a very expressive writing ink (my opinion), but a good all-round workhorse that is a very fine choice for an EDC pen that sits in your pocket. In a more artistic context, it worked much better than expected. With some water dilution, you can coax a wide range of brown tones from Espresso, that combine really well together. Technical test results on Rhodia N掳 16 notepad paper, written with Lamy Safari, M-nib Backside of writing samples on different paper types
  19. Peter_H

    Extreme shading?

    I鈥檝e just read a note from my wife, written using Diamine Monboddo鈥檚 Hat. It looked black to me, so we had a discussion and she is still only using Monboddo to ink that pen. Further investigation showed this: (The contrast has been heavily reduced to show the effect on-camera, but the original is merely a more intense version of this) Horizontal lines come out as purple-ish, but the vertical ones - and cursive writing - show as totally black. Is this merely an example of extreme shading? The pen is a Jinhao clone (with Arrow clip) of the Parker Sonnet Silver Fougere, with bi-tone coated steel Jinhao F nib.
  20. From the album: Odds and ends

    150 opened bottles of inks now have no place in my (wife's work-from-home) desk's main storage space, which is absolutely chockers, so most of these now live inside clear, stackable Daiso plastic storage boxes under the spare bed in the same room. Then there are also the 25 Diamine Inkvent Red Edition inks, although technically I can squeeze this into one of the desk's shallow drawers:

    漏 A Smug Dill


    • 0 B
    • x
  21. Ink Shoot-Out : Diamine Safari vs Super5 Dublin Green In 2014, Diamine surprised us with a series of six inks to commemorate their 150th Anniversary. Within this set, Safari is one of my favourites. Some two years ago, I discovered the Super5 inks from papierlabor.de which are waterproof inks. One of them 鈥 Dublin Green 鈥 looks very similar to Safari in written text. That of course piqued my interest 鈥 time do a detailed comparison and find out which of these inks I like the most. Enter... the Ink Shoot-Out. A brutal fight spanning five rounds, where two inks engage in all-out battle to determine who is the winner. Today the billboard announces the exciting fight between two middle-weight female fighters. In the left corner 鈥 from Liverpool, England 鈥 the reigning champion Denise 鈥渢he Dancer鈥. In the right corner the challenger from Darmstadt, Germany: Hildegarde 鈥渢he Hook鈥. Both champions are evenly matched, so this promises to be an exciting fight! Tension in the boxing hall is building up... when the fighters enter the arena, they are welcomed to a thunderous applause. The bell rings, signaling the start of the first round. May the best ink win鈥 Round 1 鈥 First Impressions Both inks make a great first impression on me: murky, dirty greyish greens with a touch of yellow. Really nice-looking on all kinds of paper. This is the type of colour that appeals to me. Even though these are muted inks, they provide excellent contrast with the paper even in the finest nibs, leaving a well-saturated line on the Rhodia N掳16 notepad paper. Both inks exhibit strong and elegant shading, without too much contrast between the light and darker parts. This immediately elevates the aesthetics of your writing. The inks look nearly identical in writing, but there are some differences: Safari has a broader colour span, and shows more elegant moves. They don鈥檛 call her 鈥渢he Dancer鈥 for nothing. This is clearly illustrated in the saturation sample. Both inks shade nicely, but Dublin Green is a lot more subtle. Due to its narrower colour range, the shading is more subdued, and looks a bit more elegant to me. Dublin Green is a bit greyer, with no yellow in its dye composition. Both inks make a superb first impression 鈥 a choreography of dancing moves, circling their opponent and exchanging probing flurries of strikes and counter-strikes. And the public agrees 鈥 encouraging their champions with roaring approval and deafening applause. At the end of this first round, it really shows that these fighters are evenly matched. No clear winner emerges, and this round ends with a draw. Round 2 鈥 Writing Sample The writing sample was done on Rhodia N掳16 Notepad with 80 gsm paper. Both inks behaved flawlessly, with no feathering and no show-through or bleed-through. With the EF nib, Safari shows its strength, and looks much more saturated. Dublin Green feels less lubricated and leaves a less saturated line with the EF nib. With broader nibs, the Super5 ink no longer has lubrication issues, and both inks write equally well. Colourwise both inks look similar in writing, although there is definitely more of a grey undertone in the Dublin Green ink. Both inks also shade nicely, without too much contrast between light and dark parts. This aesthetically pleasing shading gives more character to your writing, and shows up even with the finer nibs. For this round, the focus is on writing, and here both inks are strong performers. At the beginning of the round, the Dancer from Liverpool broke through the defences of the German ink, delivering a powerful punch. But the Super5 ink recovered nicely, and for the rest of the round both champions were evenly matched. Almost a draw, but that initial punch counts, and so this round goes to Safari on points. Round 3 鈥 Pen on Paper This round allows the batlling inks to show how they behave on a range of fine writing papers. From top to bottom, we have : Midori notebook paper, Paperblanks 120 gsm paper, Tomoe River 52 gsm, Fantasticpaper, Original Crown Mill cotton paper and Clairefontaine Triomphe 90 gsm. All scribbling and writing was done with a Lamy Safari M-nib. Both champions did really well, with no show-through nor bleed-through. But this round is not about technicalities, it is about aesthetics and beauty. Are the fighters able to make the paper shine ? One thing is immediately apparent: these inks are at home on a wide range of papers, both white and off-white ones. On white paper, Dublin Green clearly shows its greyer nature 鈥 on cream paper, both inks look more or less the same. The Diamine ink is a bit more expressive and complex-looking in the swabs. Dublin Green, on the other hand, looks more subtle in the shading. Overall, really strong inks with only minimal differences in style. Both inks are on par with each other, with neither of the champions giving any ground. Both fighters gave their all, providing quite a spectacle. The crowd is loving it! But in the end, neither ink could score a solid hit, and as such the third round ends with a draw. The tension in the hall is now going up by the minute. Are both fighters really each other鈥檚 equal ? Will one of them show some weakness ? Let鈥檚 continue the fight to find out. Round 4 鈥 Ink Properties With the ring of the bell that announces the fourth round, Safari immediately dances to her opponent ready to bring more action to the fight. But wait鈥 what鈥檚 happening? The German ink breaks through the defenses with a solid left hook鈥 wham! Oh my god! Safari goes down and hits the canvas! The crowd is shocked into silence, then roars its approval! 10鈥 9鈥 8鈥 7鈥 Oh no鈥 this is a disaster鈥 Safari is groaning, and struggles to right itself 鈥 6鈥 5鈥 finally Denise 鈥渢he Dancer鈥 scrambles to her feet, groggily shaking her head. But the round is lost! The referee rightfully grants this round to the German fighter. In this round, the biggest difference between Safari and Dublin Green emerges. The Super5 ink is designed to be water-resistant, and it shows: no smudging, and the ink effortlessly survives a 15-minute soak in water. For the smudge test, I let both inks dry for 30 seconds, and then rubbed a moist Q-tip cotton swab over the text. For the droplet test, I dripped water on the grid and let it sit there for 15 minutes. The difference is clear: Super5 Dublin Green definitely is very water-resistant, making it a good ink for use at the office. Round 5 鈥 The Fun Factor Welcome to the final round. Here I give you a purely personal impression of both inks, where I judge which of them I like most when doing some fun stuff like doodling and drawing. Both inks do well, and show off a lovely colour spectrum, ranging from very light grey- and yellow-green to a really dark and saturated green. I really enjoyed using them. The drawing was done on a piece of 10x15cm HP photo paper. Personally I prefer the slightly greyer looks of Dublin Green. This ink also feels a bit more complex, with more character in the drawing. Safari looks soft and restrained 鈥 an ink with a joyous appearance but not too wild. Dublin Green on the other hand is more of a bad girl showing more temparement. In my opinion, the Super5 ink definitely looks better in this drawing. For this round, both champions are again well matched. But for this judge, Dublin Green showed the best moves, and wins this round on points. Mind鈥 this is a relative comparison. Standing on its own, Diamine Safari is still a terrific ink to play around with. But side by side, I definitely prefer the Dublin Green from Super5. The Verdict Both inks are real jewels, that work on all types of paper. These are real champions, that both deserve a place in your ink collection. But counting the points, it鈥檚 clear that the challenger from Germany proved to be stronger. Even if you ignore the whopping win in round 4 (i.e. you don鈥檛 care about water resistance), Dublin Green still manages to be the slightly better ink. So for this judge, the conclusion is clear: Super5 Dublin Green is the winner of this exciting fight.
  22. I've recently purchased a bottle of Diamine Dark Forest, which I was hoping would be more of a fir-tree green, but is, in fact, close to olive. What blue ink (presumably Diamine) should I blend with it to create a more beautiful, less olive, color? Thanks! Gary
  23. Diamine Purple Dream (150th Anniversary II) The ink maker from Liverpool is one of the staple brands in ink-land. They consistently produce solid inks for a very reasonable price. In 2017, Diamine released their second ink series to commemorate their 150th Anniversary. I obtained my set shortly thereafter, but more or less forgot about them when my attention drifted to Japanese inks. About time to do the reviews. Fortunately, these anniversary inks are still easily obtainable, so if you like what you see you can still get them. Purple Dream is a nicely saturated purple that looks quite lovely. This is what I consider a 鈥渟tandard鈥 purple 鈥 not too blue, not too red 鈥 but just bang in the middle. It鈥檚 a colour that works great for daily journaling, but is a bit too colourful for me to use at work. As we are used to from Diamine, the ink performs well and writes a saturated line in all nib sizes. Shading is present with F nibs and above, but fairly unobtrusive 鈥 there is not a lot of contrast between the light and darker parts. The ink itself is on the wet side: combine it with wet pens, and you get a deeply saturated purple line that almost 鈥 but not totally 鈥 drowns out the shading. With dry pens shading is more prominently visible, and can look quite stunning. Purple Dream works well with both white and cream paper. With low-quality paper, there is a tiny bit of feathering, and you can expect a fair amount of show-through and bleed-through. This Purple Dream is one of three purple colours in the 150 Anniversary II Series. Its siblings are Lilac Night and Burgundy Royale. Lilac Night is a beautiful muted blue-grey-purple that I really enjoy. Burgundy Royale is a reddish purple that has an old-rose quality to it 鈥 usually not my type of colour, but for some reason I find this Diamine implementation really attractive. I鈥檓 definitely going to explore this one in the near future. To illustrate the colour span of Purple Dream, I did a swab on 52 gsm Tomoe River paper, where I really saturated portions of the paper with ink. This Purple Dream has a fairly narrow colour span, with not much contrast between the light and darker parts. This translates to unobtrusive shading when writing. Shading is definitely there (starting with F nibs and above) but remains fairly low. Just enough to accentuate that you鈥檙e writing with a fountain pen. On the smudge test 鈥 rubbing text with a moist Q-tip cotton swab 鈥 the ink showed lots of smearing, but the text itself remains crips and clear. Water resistance is totally absent 鈥 most colour disappears from the page, leaving only some purple smudges. From the chroma, I expected a bit more water resistance, but that is not the case. I鈥檝e tested the ink on a wide variety of paper 鈥 from crappy Moleskine to high-end Tomoe River. On each scrap of paper I show you: An ink swab, made with a cotton Q-tip 1-2-3 pass swab, to show increasing saturation An ink scribble made with a Lamy Safari M-nib fountain pen The name of the paper used, written with a Lamy Safari B-nib A small text sample, written with the Lamy Safari M-nib Source of the quote, written with an F-nib Pelikan M600 Drying times of the ink on the paper (with the M-nib Safari) The multi-paper writing test shows that Purple Dream can handle most papers well, looking good on both white and cream paper. There is a small amount of feathering on low-quality paper, but nothing really extreme. With cheap paper, you do get a lot of see-through and some bleed-through, making it nigh impossible to use the backside of the paper. Drying times were mostly around the 10 second mark with the Lamy Safari M-nib. Because scans don't always capture an ink's colour and contrast with good precision, I also add a few photos to give you an alternative look on this Diamine ink. To my eye, the scans show the ink a bit too light, the photos a bit too dark 鈥 reality is a bit in between. Writing with different nib sizes The picture below shows the effect of nib sizes on the writing (written on Rhodia N掳16 80 gsm paper). All samples were written with a Lamy Safari. I also added a couple of visiting pens: a Pelikan M605 with F-nib, and an Edison Collier with M-nib. Purple Dream looks good in all pens, but shading is most visible with the dry-writing Lamy pen. Related inks To compare Diamine Purple Dream with related inks, I use my nine-grid format with the currently reviewed ink at the center. This format shows the name of related inks, a saturation sample, a 1-2-3 swab and a water resistance test 鈥 all in a very compact format. This Purple Dream seems to occupy the central space between more blue- and red-leaning purples. Perfectly mixed, and a pleasure to the eye! Inkxperiment 鈥 event horizon As a personal challenge, I try to create interesting drawings using only the ink I鈥檓 reviewing. I find this to be a fun extension of the hobby, and these single-ink drawings are great for exploring the colour-range nuances that are present in the ink. I love doing them! Inspiration for this drawing comes from the Sagitarius A* black-hole picture, released to the world on May 12, 2022. Astronomers, using the Event Horizon Telescope, released the first image of the accretion disk around the event horizon of Sagitarius A*, the supermassive black hole sitting at the center of our own galaxy. I used the concept of an 鈥渆vent horizon鈥 as central theme in the inkxperiment drawing. I started with an A5 piece of 300 gsm watercolour paper. I wetted two circular rings surrounding the top-left and bottom-right corners of the paper, and applied some pure ink using a brush. These circular areas constitute the event horizon. I then used cotton Q-tips to draw in the houses within the horizon 鈥 these are elongated and being drawn into the singularity present in the corners of the page. Between the two singularities, a distorted starry background appears, drawn with Q-tips and different water-ink ratios. The stars were added with a B-nibbed fountain pen. I finally did a final pass over the drawing, adding some finishing touches. Purple Dream turns out to be a really nice ink to draw with. It鈥檚 easy and fun to use, and the resulting drawing gives you a good idea of what can be achieved with this Diamine ink in a more artsy context. Inkxpired 鈥 computational art I love experimenting with pen/ink/paper, and am now adding another layer as part of the hobby. I鈥檓 exploring computational art, inspired by the ink drawings I do during ink reviews. Another fun offshoot of the hobby鈥 and all that starting with a few drops of dye-coloured water on paper. Starting from the 鈥渆vent horizon鈥 drawing, I applied some filters to the drawing (using the Oilist app on iPad), and then stitched two mirrored copies of the result together. What you get is a picture of a Yoda statue, sitting in its Jedi Shrine. Cool! Conclusion Diamine Purple Dream is a lovely-looking purple, that for me embodies the concept of a 鈥渟tandard鈥 purple. The ink works well with both white and cream paper, and writes fairly wet and well-saturated in all nib sizes. I enjoyed experimenting with it 鈥 both for writing and drawing - and can definitely recommend it if you enjoy purple inks. Technical test results on Rhodia N掳 16 notepad paper, written with Lamy Safari, M-nib Backside of writing samples on different paper types
  24. I recently got a couple of inks from PurePens, Noodler's Red-Black and J. Herbin Vert de Gris. Also a random ink sample which turned out to be Dominant Industry Royal Azalea (cute pink on it's lighter shades, a bit too much for me on the darker ones). One of the main reasons I had for getting Red-Black was my liking for Oxblood, but wishing it didn't get destroyed by any water droplets (as it already did a few times on my work notes). Here's a slightly not scientific comparison between the two. I'm still experimenting on which types of nibs I like Red-Black the best, but I love it already. The bottles: Comparison sheet (Rhodia 80 g/m虏): Red black shows some good resistance to water and bleach since it's at least partially bulletproof. The dry times are long, but that might be because of the nibs I used. The Ahab is very wet even when not flexing, and the Kaweco Sport used is a broad nib. I've seen reviews with lower drying times, so I'll keep an eye out for that as I use this ink more. Both inks look great, but Red-Black has more tone variation and shading, while Oxblood is more homogeneous. Chromatographies: Both inks seem to be formulated in a similar way, having a darker component, a red component, and a yellow. Noodler's red black also has a pink-ish side that shows up along with the red component. When I first inked up a pen with Red-Black, it came out as a bright red, since I had not shaken the bottle and I assume the dark and yellow tones had separated.





  • Create New...