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  1. I already had some staining on one from Noodler's black, and had some shimmer left over in another one from Colorverse's Gluon, both inside the barrel where the small grooves are. What are the inks I should definitely stay away from if I don't want to permanently stain the barrel? Are there specific colors that stain more than others? What are the easy to wash out inks?
  2. Can anyone explain to me why they like the designs so I can appreciate it more? I don’t mean to be rude or criticize people for what they like, I am just curious why you like the look of these pens. Just please reply! I really want to know what the appeal is. Thank you for your help! W. Major
  3. mariom

    My franken-TWSBI

    I've wanted to try a gold nib in my Rose Gold 580 for a while. Not because there was anything wrong with the stock nib, but, well, just because. Each time I ended up with a nib from an unrecoverable vintage pen, I'd give it a try. Every one was the wrong size - too long, short, broad or narrow. When I ended up with this Skyline nib, it looked about right when compared side by side, so I pulled the nib and feed and it just slid in. I had to do a bit of heat setting to get the feed in contact with it, but it now writes very well. The feed doesn't supply enough ink to allow it to flex to its full extent without railroading, but it's smooth and very pleasant to write with. Mario
  4. TWSBI FRANKENPEN Flex Hi all I've been in search of a twsbi with a flex nib and with some work I was able to tinker with a TWSBI Eco and an FPR Ultraflex to create a flexy TWSBI Eco and I wanted to share what I did and how it turned out. I have heard of Fountain pen revolution and recently I have had the pleasure of purchasing a few of their pens. Great pens and seamless experience. One of the pens that I purchased from FPR was the Indus pen. Comparing the feeds of the TWSBI Eco and the Indus, the feeds looked to be the same size. 1. The first thing I tried was straight swapping the nib/feed from the Indus pen into the TWSBI Eco. This wasn't successful because the feed while of a similar size was not exactly the same and didn't seat well into the Eco. 2. My next attempt was to take the feed from the Eco and put the FPR nib on it. At first glance there was a gap between the nib and the feed. When searching through fpn history I found that there were two possible solutions. Either to bend the nib to meet the feed or to somehow bend the feed to meet the nib. The recommendation was to whenever possible bend the feed. Bending the nib may result in tines too close together. 3. The solution is not recommended and not for the faint of heart but did work YMMV. Its common knowledge that you can heat set an ebonite feed, however the TWSBI feed is plastic. Per suggestions I boiled a cup of water and held part of the feed under water for 10 seconds. Then I slowly and little by little pressed the feed against a solid counter to force the feed to bend upwards (repeat as necessary, better safe than sorry). 4. At this point I put the FPR Nib + TWSBI feed and section together and ended up with a pen that wrote. Another problem arose while I fiddled with the nib. It was super loose ( no effort to remove the nib ). Back to FPN I went for suggestions. I found a few solutions, either to use shellac to create a wedging effect or to bend the nib at the base (furthest part of the nib away from the writing tip) by flattening it a bit. Also risky and not recommended for the faint of heart. Little by little I got the feed nib and section to play well together. I've attached some shots of the writing (first image I was running low on ink which caused the railroading)
  5. So today I got to my dusty now pen holder and took out 3 Twsbi ECOs which were sitting there unused for around 2 years half-inked. They did not dry! To my surprise they even wrote from first nib touch to the paper, amazing! The inks were quite decent quality as well, Iroshizuku Kon Peki, Sailor Yama-Dori and Souten, so that may have been a factor too, colours however did come out much darker than normally attributing for some H2O loss.
  6. My preordered TWBI ECO in yellow arrived in the mail today. YAY!!! I was thrilled to see that it wasn't a dull orange-yellow or an eye-stabbing neon yellow, nor yet a depressing school bus yellow (which never fails to look dingy to my eye). Nope! What I have is a sunny cheerful yellow. See it below! Now I just have to ink this pretty pen up ... but though I would like to use a yellow to yellow-orange ink (but nothing mustard-like) I don't know which ink I should use. Would anyone like to offer up any suggestions as to which ink I can pair up with my new pen? Please and thank you!
  7. drwell

    Hi From Sydney Australia

    Hi All I just wanted to let you know that I lurked for a while and read your advice on buying my first fountain pen. Many people recommended the TWSBI Vac700R as a good starter that is quite reliable. A few people emphasized to consider what size pen to get. They saved me from making a bad choice with the Lamy (my original preference) which has too small a diameter for my hand. I bought the TWSBI from Pulp Addiction in fire affected Victoria. I chose the fine nib. After writing for a while I changed my mind and went from a fine nib to a medium.I wanted to let everyone know how pleased I am with it and say thanks. Also, I wanted to thank the people who have done the detailed ink reviews and detailed ink swatches and spectrometer analyses. You have been a big help in making some choices of red/brown colored inks which for some reason I find stimulates me to write. Warm regards gary
  8. Disclaimer: English is not my first language and this is my first review. The history on how I got the pen: A bit more than a year ago I started really getting invested in this hobby and the wonderful world of fountain pens, even though I have used them for my whole life preferring the feel of a nib rather than a rollerball. I wanted to buy my first own fountain pen (still using the OHTO Tasche that my father gave my for my 12th birthday, it was very beat up, but still working fine) that would be my new workhorse for school. A fountain pen that could take a beating (still in school), did not work on cartridges, was easy to clean, is pretty, reliable, has a nice fun factor and is somewhat unique (not the cigar shaped black and gold ones you see everywhere). The last one meant for me that the nib would not be a nail, but have some give that I could play with. After weeks on end looking up on fountain pens and falling deeper and deeper in this rabbit hole I settled on the one fountain pen that I just couldn't take my eyes off: the TWSBI precision fountain pen with a 40ml bottle of Diamine velvet blue, bought at Cultpens. The nib: 9/10 The nib is a steel JoWo #5 nib. I got it with an EF nib since my writing is pretty small and I often times have to utilize crappy paper. The nib is stamped with the TWSBI logo. It is a decently wet writer and quite smooth, which is nice since it is an EF. It has a tiny bit of feedback, which I like. All in all, a very nice nib, which is expected of a JoWo Build quality: 8.5/10 This pen is almost entirely made out of aluminum. The barrel and cap are made out of a solid milled out rod of aluminum and have a brushed finish. The section has the same finish which is nice since it makes it not slippery even with sweaty fingers after a long writing session. The piston operates very smoothly and has not shown any signs of issues within a year of use. The clip is strong but not too stiff, it works just fine and will hold the pen in place. The facets line up when capping the pen, although I have found some examples of where this hasn't been the case. (hence the point reduction) The pen has an inkwindow which is an acrylic clear section of about 4mm in length. This inkwindow is very usable since you can see the ink clearly sloshing around but there are some (barely visible) seems. Writing experience: 9/10 The pen is not a light one but I like that. You do not need to post the pen but it can be done. However, the balance shifts to the rear of the pen when you do that since the cap isn't light either and sits quite high on the back of the pen. When not capped the balance is just right and the metal is nice and cool to the touch for the first few minutes. The section is on the thin side which could be an issue for people with big hands combined with thick fingers. It is not an issue for me, in fact, I find the section to be very comfortable. The pen is a piston filler so it has great ink capacity, being able to write pages and pages on end. This nib offers a bit of line variation and I find that really nice to have. It gives a little extra to your writing. All in all, a nice experience even with boring tasks. Summary: I really like this pen and do not know why so little people care about it. It writes really well and gives me joy every time I use it. If you have any experience with JoWo nibs the nib will not surprise you but the pen might. The modern and industrial design makes it an eye catcher and having the ability to completely disassemble the pen (and I mean completely) is a feature I wish more pens would have. If you have $80 dollars to spare on a very nice pen that competes with pens of a much higher price, consider this pen. Thank you for reading and if you have any tips or suggestions, I would be glad to hear them for future reviews.
  9. Hi everyone! Has anyone seen the news about the new model of TWSBI Eco-T in Mint slated for release next week on 16 Dec 2019? So far, I've seen it here, here , and here. (Edited to add: And here.) I have about 7 TWSBI Ecos and a single TWSBI Diamond 580, but I haven't yet purchased an Eco-T. Is the performance the same as an Eco or 580? Or is it different enough to warrant getting one? I confess, the lovely translucent mint color is making it hard to resist buying it. It looks like the palest of chrysocolla, the gem-grade variety ... which, had the pen parts been made of the actual gem material, would price this pen right out of a lot of people's budgets (but would have been hellaciously awesome!) Anybody have an opinion about the Eco T they feel like sharing with a newbie?
  10. sockmonkey

    Vac Mini: Where Does This O-Ring Go?

    Hi, I took my Vac Mini apart for a thorough cleaning today and found an o-ring when emptying the tank of my cleaner. I have no idea where it goes, but I bet someone here does. Any idea based on the attached photo? Thanks!
  11. essayfaire

    Twsbi Go Review (Brief)

    I recently have become very interested in the different filling mechanisms used in fountain pens. As a result, when the TWSBI Go was introduced with a spring-loaded piston mechanism at a reasonable (under US$20) price, I decided to order my first TWSBI. The Go is made of solid-feeling plastic. I like that everything on it feels nice and tight. The pen is a bit short, and I find the width a bit wide for the length of pen. It doesn't really seem to be intended for use posted, which is how I usually write (unless the pen is Capless). This is a demonstrator pen, so everything is on display from the spring that is responsible for drawing the ink to the large ink reservoir (making it easy to see what color is inside). it feels much more substantial in the hand then similar clear plastic pens. I purchased an F nib, which seems to be appropriately labeled. Not particularly smooth, but not scratchy either. I also like that the pen is tapered towards the nib; it makes the width of the pen more suitable (at least for my hand). Pros: LARGE ink reservoir, interesting and fun filling mechanism, price, seems pretty leak-proof Cons: A bit inelegant, a bit wide, the nib is just adequate Bottom Line: Though I like the filling mechanism and ink capacity of this pen, I don't expect to use it often. I did fall in love with the new ink I opened at the same time, however!
  12. boulderchips

    New Addict In Rhode Island

    Hi everyone — I've been lurking on the info forums for months, so I'm glad to finally join. Thanks to all for being such a cool community. I snagged my first fountain pen late last year and fell in love. I do much of my writing by hand, and fountain pens have changed my literary life for the better. I'm originally from Colorado but currently live in Providence, RI. My three favorite pens so far: Platinum 3776 (my only gold nib), TWSBI Eco, and Noodler's Ebonite Konrad. Still searching for that everyday-writer ink though... Happy writing.
  13. Hey guys! Normally post in the Japan pens forum but I picked up a TWSBI 580ALR from Mark Bacas with a special nib grind and I wanted to share some info about it. First off - the ALR is just like an AL except the cap band has a difference finish(?) and most importantly the grip section is 'ribbed.' The lines on the grip section feel amazing, really good to the touch. I consider it an upgrade from my AL, but you do have to be careful not to get ink in those lines because you would have to clean it out. Mark Bacas is a popular nibmeister. You can see his work at https://www.instagram.com/nibgrinder/ I got the 580ALR with a Blade Turk grind and if I had it to do over again I would send him my nicest pen because it's an amazing grind. The Blade Turk is a mini-architect grind with a gentle curve so you get a controlled gradation of line width from Platinum UEF to Japanese M. It's a really versatile tool. Anyone could just pick it up and write with it, but if you vary the angle up or down you can variation in width. An artist could probably build a whole career around this nib, as the more you use it the more you get to know what it can do and get the line widths you want without even thinking about it. Here's a video demo I made of the pen & nib: And here's an additional photoset: https://imgur.com/fpngallery/eXPLoO9 Mark Bacas deals TWSBI pens so I think you can just order a nib from him already ground to load into your TWSBI. This gives some additional options for nib types normally only found on Japanese pens, for example... or various architect grinds. Anyhow, I really love the pen and I'm considering sending him my King of Pen to work on next. This Blade Turk is just such an interesting and unique grind. I'd recommend it for any artist but also anyone who just wants an interesting fountain pen nib that is still appropriate for every day use.
  14. penzel_washinkton

    Wait.. That's A Twsbi? Twsbi Aurora

    So, lazy Sunday here and was just swiping through my IG feeds and caught a glimpse of a green acrylic pen that got me interested. Was thinking probably an Italian manufacturer that I follo or Moonman related pen but was nicely surprised that the it came from the official TWSBI Instagram. They are calling it the Aurora and will be a Limited Edition pen released on 18th of March (tomorrow!) so for those interested can prepare their wallet. Flat top and bottom, green swirly acrylic and a piston filler. The price is defined though at $100 which will make this the most priciest TWSBI pen ever released CMIIW. Here is the picture of the pen along with the TWSBI home link: https://www.twsbi.com/ (photo courtesy of TWSBI)
  15. I looking to buy a new pen and I'm tied between the TWSBI Vac 700r and the Pilot Custom 74. I know there quite a lot of differences between the two, but here's why I like them: I love the gold nib and smooth writing of the Custom 74, but I really want to try out a vacuum filler and a larger ink capacity is of great convenience to me, plus I like demonstrators. The Vac 700 sells for around 7,700 rupees whereas the Custom 74 sells for about 8000 rupees. Which one should I go for?
  16. Where can I buy nib Tuning Supplies like micro-mesh and mylar paper in India?
  17. Hi, is there anyone in India who is willing to sell the TWSBI diamond 580 or Vac 700r? I'm in for buying some Twsbi pens and wasn't sure where to look for them. I want to try them out. If you're interested in selling yours, message me:)
  18. Hi, I was thinking about buying my first TWSBI pen and I'm confused about which one I should buy. I've shortlisted the TWSBI Eco, TWSBI 580 and TWSBI Vac 700. If it were up to you, which pen would you buy and recommend?
  19. Hi, so, since most of us who love fountain pens can't really seem to stop buying pens, I thought it'd be cool to see how many pens you have in your pen collection. So, How many Fountain Pens do you have in your pen collection so far?
  20. Hello! I live in India and I am looking to buy the Pilot custom 74. Is there a good website where I can buy Pilot pens and Inks for a reasonable price? Amazon sells some of them, but I was wondering if there is better, more direct way of buying them?
  21. Some people can wield a big, fat stub and get amazing results. Not me. I'm a sloppy writer and still learning basic penmanship. I rotate my pens and stubs don't like that. I write fast, and stubs don't always forgive me for it. Just for fun, I made a quick comparison of the stubs that I have in my collection at the moment. ^---normal writing speed at left, slow in the middle, fast at right The TWSBI 1.1 stub I've personally got three of those, in two pens: the Eco and the Go. One is nice (in the Eco), one is okay (in the Go), one is sharp, scratchy, dry, unusable and out of rotation. They're the only ones in this comparison that have a small amount of bounce and they're not very sensitive to rotation (which is good news for me). They're dry-ish when writing at speed, as can be seen in the writing sample. In terms of line thickness, both their vertical and their horizontal strokes are the widest of the 1.1 nibs in this comparison. Crispness is OK but not exceptional. No hard starts (good). No railroads (good). Pens: TWSBI Eco with 1:1 mixture of J. Herbin Rouge Caroubier and Diamine Sunshine Yellow and TWSBI Go with Noodler's Burgundy. Verdict: a nice, all-round, rather forgiving stub. The Lamy 1.1 italic Lamy offers cheap 1.1, 1.5 and 1.9 replacement nibs that you can slide on to your Safaris and such. I can't even wield a 1.5 (see below under Kaweco) and therefore a 1.9 is way out of my league, so I bought the 1.1. This nib, which is an italic, offers you a hard deal: absolutely wonderful crispness at the cost of rotation sensitivity and scratchiness. I love the look of the text on paper, it's so nice, so crisp, so disctinctive... But with my unsteady hand, I can only use it with pleasure when writing slow. At normal writing speeds, I can tolerate it. When writing fast, it feels like an abomination. This nib could be a true gift to people who have a steady hand and good penmanship. No hard starts (good). No railroads (good). Pen: Lamy ABC with Lamy Blue ink, but it will also fit the Safari and some other Lamy pens (and supposedly even a Platinum Preppy!) Verdict: amazing crispness at the cost of forgiveness... Choose, because you can't have your cake and eat it too. Kaweco #2 1.1 stub One of the many charms of the Kaweco family is that the Liliput, the Sport, the Dia2 and the Special all sport the same #2 screw-in nib/feed collar, so instead of buying a dedicated pen for each nib size you can buy one nice pen and swab nibs in under 60 seconds. I'm not exaggerating: pull out the converter, unscrew the nib/feed collar, screw in the new one, pop in the converter, prime the feed and you're off to the races. Among other models I have a Dia2, which in my opinion is one of the best modern pens being sold today around its price point, and I've got several nibs to use with it, including the 1.1 stub. Its line width is slightly less than that of the TWSBI 1.1, in both directions. It's also slightly more crisp than the TWSBI, which I like, especially since this crispness does not come at the expense of smoothness or rotation sensitivity. Compared to the Lamy, the downstroke is slightly wider and the sidestroke slightly more thin. This is a nib that offers both smoothness and good crispness (though nothing near the exceptional crispness of the Lamy). In fact, it's smoothness is incredible and needs to be felt to be believed. Performance is flawless: it always starts, it doesn't railroad. The TWSBI stub seems to offer more shading, though. Pen: Kaweco Dia2 GT with Iroshizuku Shin-Kai. Verdict: an amazingly smooth and forgiving stub without sacrificing too much crispness, solid performance, a good mix of qualities and clearly a notch above the TWSBI. Kaweco #2 1.5 stub This stub matches the smoothness of its smaller cousin, but that's where the similarities end. Perhaps it's me; perhaps I'm not ready to play with the grown-ups yet. After all, I also couldn't really befriend the Pineider La Grande Bellezo stub, nor the Leonardo 1.5 stub. To me, 1.5 feels as wide as the Grand Canyon and I really struggle to get something nice out of it. This Kaweco 1.5 is no exception to that, despite its amazing smoothness. Personal shortcomings aside, I do notice less crispness in the lines (the worst of this sample) and it's a severe hard-starter. To be specific, after capping the pen and putting it away, it doesn't write when you want to continue, especially on smooth paper. Not just on downstrokes either, it just doesn't write at all after a pauze and takes quite some effort to get going again. In terms of line width, this stub is wide enough to make standard line spacing in a notebook too small (in this case an Oxford 90 g/m^2 notebook with 8 mm line spacing). This is one big nib and it requires lots of space - that's how it was designed, so no criticism there. Pen: Kaweco Dia2 GT with Iroshizuku Shin-Kai. Verdict: very smooth and forgiving stub, but at the expense of crispness (at least when writing at normal and fast speeds). Obnoxious hard-starter, prefers rough paper. Should not be confined to the limitations of ordinary notebooks - this nib really wants to do calligraphy. The outsider: 1948 Onoto 5601 with #3 ST nib I added this Onoto for the sake of reference and comparison, not as a contender. This is a wonderful, narrow stub and they just don't seem to make 'em like that anymore. This is one of the few stubs that make me forget about the pen so that i can just focus on writing. Ink: J. Herbin Lierre Sauvage, Summary: Those who can handle the Lamy 1.1 italic will be highly rewarded by its amazing crispness. As an all-round, forgiving, wonderfully smooth steel stub that does not sacrifice much in terms of crispness, Kaweco's 1.1 is a thing of beauty and as such is the overall "winner". The TWSBI 1.1 is a solid all-round stub that lacks some of the finesse and smoothness of the Kaweco 1.1. The Kaweco 1.5 might be the ticket for those who require a really smooth nib for calligraphy purposes. (When I find the ultimate stub for me, I'll let you know. At the moment the chase seems to be even better than the catch.) EDIT: corrected the text about the Lamy 1.1, which is an italic.
  22. Hi, I've been involved with foulntain pens for the last six months, and so far I have one Metropolitan, one Vista, a few Jinhao pens and a Parker Frontier. I am looking to expand my collection. I prefer fine nibs that write moderately wet and give a little bit of feedback, I don't care much for the body of the pen as long as it's comfortable. What pen would you recommend under $45?
  23. What is the best Demonstrator pen for a budget of under 50 dollars?
  24. evaisnotonline

    New Twsbi Eco-T Piston Problems

    Hi all, This is my first post - it's so great to finally make an account after lurking for so long! I bought my third beginner fountain pen recently, a clear TWSBI Eco-T, which I have been lusting after for a long time, and finally arrived yesterday! I've already used one ink fill, and was screwing the barrel down to the refill it, and now it won't screw back up. the piston is at the bottom of the pen, near the nib, however there is no gap at the top of the pen where you should insert the wrench to unscrew the top. When I turn the top one way, it tried to press the piston further down into the pen (and it can't move any farther) and when I twist it the other way, it simply tightens the end cap! I've tried taking out the nib and using a thin crochet hook to push the piston up from the nib end of the pen, but it isn't moving and I don't want to force it. Attached is a picture of the pen body, nib attached but cap off. Any advice would be helpful, I'm new to piston pens and don't want to damage it! Thank you for your time! Eva.
  25. LemurInk

    Twsbi Pastels - December 14Th Release

    The pastel pink and blue ECOs were a China exclusive earlier this year, but will now be released worldwide December 14th. Only available in extra-fine and fine nibs, this will be a limited edition with maybe two production runs, and that's it.





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