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  1. Since I'm converting to Judaism (and like Judaism-inspired designs), I was looking into Judaism-related fountain pens, and I was struck by a curious trend: almost all the pens I could find related to Judaism or Israel are made by Italian companies. And it's not just one company or anything...a lot of major Italian brands seem to have made one at some point. For example: Delta Israel 60th anniversaryMontegrappa Fortuna ShemaOmas Israel 50th JubileeStipula Israel 65th anniversaryUrso MezuzahVisconti Twelve Tribes of IsraelVisconti Jewish BibleBy contrast, the only non-Italian Judaica pens I've found are the Bexley Israel 50th anniversary and the Curtis Australia State of Israel 60th anniversary. It's kind of an odd trend...I can understand Japanese companies not being interested in making Jewish pens, but you'd think that the US or Germany would make more. Is there some cultural or economic connection between Italy and Israel that would encourage this sort of design from Italian makers, or is this just a strange coincidence?
  2. visvamitra

    Stipula Sins (?)

    The title may not be accurate but,as many titles of this typy it has a potential to draw more knowledgeable people I'm interested in buying / trying some new Stipula inks however it seems it's practically impossible in EUrope (at least in my usual sources - La Couronne du Comte and Appelboom). Does anyone know why big e-retailers don't carry their products? I've tried to contact Stipula via their website but received no answer. I've never been interested in their pens so my knowledge about the company and it's market is limited. I'm interested in making it wider.
  3. Has anybody seen or reviewed the new Stipula Spash? It's supposed to be a demonstrator with a flexible steel nib! http://fpgeeks.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/stipula-splash-fountain-pens-posted.jpg Here's a link to one. http://www.fountainpenhospital.com/Index_Showcase.asp?BOD=/collections/collection.asp%3FMFG%3D37%26CK%3D1813
  4. visvamitra

    Terra Di Siena (Brown) - Stipula

    Stipula Pen Company originates from Florentine, Italy and was established in 1973. Stipula is a historic term used by the ancient Romans to indicate faithfulness to an obligation. Stipula’s has accepted the obligation to its customers to produce quality pens utilizing ancient themes, designs, techniques and traditions. It sounds nice but from my limited experience with their pens it seems they doesn't really deliver what they promise. Happily Stipula pens come with a limited lifetime warranty so the buyers are covered in case the pen fails. Additionally there are rumors that Stipula has some problems and may cease operations. I'm not sure if it's the case but it seems their products availablility on the market (especially european) is limited and only few retailers carry their pens and inks. If anyone has some news / insights about Stipula situation I would appreciate the insights so that this review provides sound informations. Stipula offers a line of eight inks sold in nice glass 2.4 oz bottles. Interesting feature of the bottles is the fact they have light polyethylene seal pushed in the neck of the bottle, visible when you unscrew the cap. The seal (is it correcy english term?) is rather hard to remove without splashing some of ink onto desk, wall, closest entourage. The colors are: Blu della Robbia (Blue) Borgogna (Red) Nero (Black) Rosso Fiorentino (Florentine Red) Terra di Siena (Brown) Verde Muschiato (Musk Green) Violet (Violet) Zafferano (Saffron) Terra di Siena is rather pleasant ink. On the other hand it's surprisingly light. I've bought a bottle and comparted to the ink I tired three years ago it's much lighter. I believe guys from Stipula buy some base ink and then mix it so the result is not always consistent. Here however the difference is quite striking. ANyway the ink flows nicely and doens't cause any feathering or bleedthrough. The color is ok but it's niot the kind of brown I'm crazy about. Drops of ink on kitchen towel Software ID Color range Tomoe River, Kaweco Classic Sport, broad nib Leuchtturm 1917, Kaweco Classic Sport, broad nib Clairefontaine Triomphe, Kawecop Skylibe Sport, double broad Rhodia DotPad, TWSBI 580, stub 1.1 Water resistance
  5. I find FPN a very friendly community and an excellent resource, and I like the idea of giving back. This year, I have two Stipula pens that I no longer want, and which I would like to give away via FPN, to two winners. WHAT CAN YOU WIN? One of two Stipula pens. WHO CAN ENTER? Anyone. But, if you already have a Stipula pen, please think twice before entering. HOW CAN YOU ENTER? Write a comment in this thread, containing two pieces of information: 1) Which pen you are going for; 2) Why you want that pen and not the other one. HOW DOES IT WORK? Enter by the end of Wednesday 21 December; that is, by 23:59 on that day, wherever you are.Shortly thereafter I shall assign all entrants a number and pick one winner for each pen using a random number generator.I shall then announce the winners on this thread and contact them via PM. I shall probably post off the prizes in the week commencing 26 December, though it may be a little later.Winners who do not respond to me VIA PM by the end of December forfeit their prize and I shall draw another winner.I will cover the cost of standard (non-tracked, non-insured) postage anywhere in the world; if you want registered mail, we can discuss the cost bilaterally. THE PRIZES Xalegrafica Alpha Thin plastic pen made to look like vintage black hard rubber, with a push-button filling-system on the side, the button being held in place by a flat band (in practice, a little like a crescent filler). The nib is steel and probably a Fine. The cap is the same material and has no clip. Elegant, classic styling. Posts well and is nicely-balanced. I’ve had it for a few years and have only ever used it once, as I didn’t really get on with it. I think it wrote OK, but it is too thin for my above-average-sized hands, and the button-filler sticking out of the side makes it impractical. As far as I know, the Alpha is one of a line of Xalegrafica models that Stipula made for the Italian market, to pay homage to various vintage designs. I Castoni, Tiger’s Eye (I think that's the model) Translucent brown-and-grey barrel (acrylic?), with a metal section and a steel medium italic/stub nib. The cap is metal and has what looks like a tiger’s eye stone in the clip. Cartridge filling system (standard international, no converter with pen). The pen does post, but the metal cap makes it ridiculously unbalanced. The barrel has no marking – the only identifier is the Stipula branding on the nib. I know I’ve used it at least twice, but not for a while and I don’t remember the writing experience: it probably wrote fine, but as I like posting my pens, my abiding memory of using it is its unbalanced nature. As far as I know, there are various colours in the Castoni range, and most use matching materials for the cap and barrel, making a metal cap a little unusual.
  6. For some reason that I cannot understand, I never wished to try Stipula inks. That was a terrible mistake. The next two inks that I'm going to review (Notturno Giannutri and Ferro dell'Elba) are two gorgeous inks, very classy and work appropriate. The ink I'm going to review now is Ferro dell'Elba (Elba's Island Iron). This ink is one of the most brilliant ink I had the pleasure to try. This inks name recalls iron rusted near the sea, and the colour of the iron rusted by the sea you get. Ferro dell'Elba is a grey ink with lovely warm rust brown undertones, that seems thinked to be absolutely work appropriate, without losing interesting details. If I've to define this ink with a single word, it would be "clever": good for the eyes of the passionate, good for the everyday use. On cheap copy paper, Ferro dell'Elba behaves just fine, a bit of feathering and bleedthrough, not particular shading, nice flow and fast drying times. The colour looks quite dark, a mix between a dark gray and sepia. On schizza e strappa this ink really begins to show it's full potential. No feathering nor bleedthrough, gorgeous shading with nice lighter grey lines that ends in darker grey brown inkpools, especially on broader nib. Inkpools and swabs look and reflects like velvet. Drying times are a little longer. On tracing paper this ink behaves just as on schizza and strappa, with a little more shading and longer drying times. Unfortunately, this ink as no water resistance. As you may notice from my soaking test, the ink simply vanishes in the water, so it's no waterproof at all (but also really easy to clean from fountain pens). Is this ink worth it? I always wanted an ink which could substitute black ink at work and after a few letters written with Ferro dell'Elba I realized that my search was over. I know it's subjective but in my opinion if you like grey inks, you should give this ink a try. For around 16€ you get a nice big 70ml bottle, and for me is worth every cent. Highly recommended! COPY PAPER SCHIZZA & STRAPPA PAPER TRACING PAPER SOAKING TEST CROMATOGRAPHY INKDROP
  7. Here we go - this tine I'll try to present Stipula Calamo line. I must say I like these inks. To be honest I don't really like Stipula fountain pens design. I've tried Passaporto and it wasn't good fountain pen. However their inks are really nice and they all have good properties. I like the bottle http://imageshack.com/a/img538/3034/Ws4ABZ.jpg and I like the content http://imageshack.com/a/img537/5260/9ZSFuj.jpg I hope you'll enjoy my presentation. So the contestants are: http://imageshack.com/a/img674/7866/6drCov.jpghttp://imageshack.com/a/img911/2522/ugskBa.jpg BLU DELLA ROBBIA (Deep Blue): subtle and delicate shade of blue. Normally I enjoy heavily saturated inks but I like this one. http://imageshack.com/a/img906/4742/rDd3IS.jpg BORGOGNA (Dark Red): decent red, not really original or unique but nice nevertheless. http://imageshack.com/a/img912/3300/8xLx6W.jpg NERO (Black): black wanna-be but it's not black. More of dark blue-black. I hate black ink so it's not surprising I don't like Nero http://imageshack.com/a/img537/8326/es3nxU.jpg ROSSO FIORENTINO: nice but not exciting http://imageshack.com/a/img905/5397/9RMSEA.jpg TERRA DI SIENA (Sepia): one of nicest browns I know. Love it. http://imageshack.com/a/img905/4092/eR1bln.jpg VERDE MUSCHIATO (Musk Green): most interesting Stipula ink. It has unique color. Of course it can be compared to Burma Road Brown, Hakodate Gagome or Join or Die Sepia but it's not really the same. It rocks. http://imageshack.com/a/img904/6276/mNA6Ht.jpg ZAFFERANO (Saffron): my personal favourite. Unhappily it's not really good ink. You have to choose good and pen to enjoy it. In most pens it looks boring and weak. Ok, let's check some scans and photos. SWABS (MONDI 90G) http://imageshack.com/a/img661/6057/bFqWI8.jpg INK ON KITCHEN TOWEL http://imageshack.com/a/img743/7972/NObegQ.jpg http://imageshack.com/a/img538/2772/fbMM7L.jpg CALENDAR http://imageshack.com/a/img674/521/QEhPZV.jpg http://imageshack.com/a/img674/153/bxboC0.jpg OXFORD PAPER http://imageshack.com/a/img536/8983/PgIqvW.jpg http://imageshack.com/a/img631/4647/YrHU7q.jpg RHODIA http://imageshack.com/a/img904/5035/cVbM18.jpg http://imageshack.com/a/img540/7233/kOBrvJ.jpg http://imageshack.com/a/img539/2888/dixF9W.jpg http://imageshack.com/a/img540/918/ht5c1c.jpg
  8. I bought a Stipula Faceted Etruria last Spring. The section came unglued from the barrel. I sent it to Yafa for repairs. They sent it to Stipula in Firenze. That was in July or August. I haven't gotten the pen back. Yafa cannot get a firm estimate of when Stipula will complete repairs and send the pen back. In fact, Clara at Yafa told me this morning that they have not received any repaired pens back from Stipula in six months! They keep telling her "We're working on it." Does anyone know if anyone is at home at Stipula? What's going on with them? I really love the Stipula Etrurias, but I am losing confidence in the company and hesitant to buy more of their pens, as much as I like the ones I have. David
  9. visvamitra

    Nero (Black) - Stipula Calamo

    Stipula Pen Company originates from Florentine, Italy and was established in 1973. Stipula is a historic term used by the ancient Romans to indicate faithfulness to an obligation. Stipula’s has accepted the obligation to its customers to produce quality pens utilizing ancient themes, designs, techniques and traditions. It sounds nice but from my limited experience with their pens it seems they doesn't really deliver what they promise. Happily Stipula pens come with a limited lifetime warranty so the buyers are covered in case the pen fails. Additionally there are rumors that Stipula has some problems and may cease operations. I'm not sure if it's the case but it seems their products availablility on the market (especially european) is limited and only few retailers carry their pens and inks. If anyone has some news / insights about Stipula situation I would appreciate the insights so that this review provides sound informations. Stipula offers a line of eight inks sold in nice glass 2.4 oz bottles. Interesting feature of the bottles is the fact they have light polyethylene seal pushed in the neck of the bottle, visible when you unscrew the cap. The seal (is it correcy english term?) is rather hard to remove without splashing some of ink onto desk, wall, closest entourage. The colors are: Blu della Robbia (Blue) Borgogna (Red) Nero (Black) Rosso Fiorentino (Florentine Red) Terra di Siena (Brown) Verde Muschiato (Musk Green) Violet (Violet) Zafferano (Saffron) Nero is Stipula's black ink. Not the blackest black there is, but flows well and makes impression of a decent writing fluid. It doesn't lubricate the nib optimally and doesn't give smooth feel you'll get from using Private Reserve's Velvet Black, Kyonooto's Nurebairo or Rohrer & Klingner Leipziger-Schwarz. Drops of ink on kitchen towel Software ID Tomoe River, Kaweco Classic Sport, broad nib Leuchtturm 1917, Kaweco Classic Sport, broad nib Comparison
  10. Stipula Pen Company originates from Florentine, Italy and was established in 1973. Stipula is a historic term used by the ancient Romans to indicate faithfulness to an obligation. Stipula’s has accepted the obligation to its customers to produce quality pens utilizing ancient themes, designs, techniques and traditions. It sounds nice but from my limited experience with their pens it seems they doesn't really deliver what they promise. Happily Stipula pens come with a limited lifetime warranty so the buyers are covered in case the pen fails. Additionally there are rumors that Stipula has some problems and may cease operations. I'm not sure if it's the case but it seems their products availablility on the market (especially european) is limited and only few retailers carry their pens and inks. If anyone has some news / insights about Stipula situation I would appreciate the insights so that this review provides sound informations. Stipula offers a line of eight inks sold in nice glass 2.4 oz bottles. Interesting feature of the bottles is the fact they have light polyethylene seal pushed in the neck of the bottle, visible when you unscrew the cap. The seal (is it correcy english term?) is rather hard to remove without splashing some of ink onto desk, wall, closest entourage. I'll add photo of the bottle in Stipula Nero ink review. The colors are: Blu della Robbia (Blue) Borgogna (Red) Nero (Black) Rosso Fiorentino (Florentine Red) Terra di Siena (Brown) Verde Muschiato (Musk Green) Violet (Violet) Zafferano (Saffron)Zafferano is rather pleasant ink. Of course a lot depends on pen, paper, nib combo you use. I'm not sure if it's kind of ink you would enjoy while using dry fine nibs. Ijn wet and broad nibs it offers nice shading and very good flow. In Waterman hemisphere fine nib the flow was good but not exceptional and the shading was also visible but, obviously, not as dramatic as in Kaweco broad nib. I believe this ink can considered as safe and easy to clean. I haven't observed feathering or bleedthrough. Personally I enjoy Zafferano a lot but I limit my use of this ink to gushers. Drops of ink on kitchen towel Software ID Tomoe River, Kaweco Classic Sport, broad nib Leuchtturm 1917, Kaweco Classic Sport, broad nib
  11. I purchased this pen from Regina Martini because of the beautiful celluloid material, her assertion that it was a Stipula product and the availability of a Stipula 1.1 mm italic nib for it. I began looking for documentation of this pen's provenance after I had committed to the purchase. I was able to find quite a bit, but some facts remain unsettled. As best I can determine, Mercury was a luxury goods manufacturer and retailer established in Belgium in 1948. In 2002, the company was sold by the descendants of the founder. It was still in business in 2007, when my pen was produced, but appears to have subsequently closed. I don't know when. Mercury bought materials from manufacturers and assembled pens which were then sold under their name. Tibaldi was an important supplier of manufactured parts, including parts made from some of their famous celluloids. The Mercury "Francois des Trixhes" model utilized Tibaldi's Grey/Blue "Impero" celluloid. Eighty pens were made. However, it seems that the Tibaldi company itself went out of business before production was complete. My pen post-dates the Tibaldi closure. The pen is made with the same Tibaldi parts as the earlier numbers in the series. However, it is fitted with a Stipula nib and converter and was packaged in a Stipula box. I have seen claims that Mercury bought up Stipula's manufactured parts when the latter went out of business. Whether Mercury or Stipula actually assembled the pen is unclear. In any case, it is a beautiful pen. It appears to have impeccable fit and finish. It writes like a dream, as I expected from prior experience with a number of Stipula 14Kt gold 1.1mm italic nibs. How about some photos? Regular red Stipula pen box The pen sits in splendid isolation Mercury's engraving. Note that other reviews I have read show photos of pens with serial numbers lower that 40 which have Bock nibs with or without Tibaldi's name. All are xx/80 however. The pen came with a Stipula-branded converter already in the pen. The nib! I am very happy with this pen, but I remain quite curious about the history of its production. I am also curious about the model name. So far, I have been unable to find anything about "Francois des Trixhes," presumably a person after whom this model was named. One FPN topic said this model was produced in celebration of the 175th anniversary of Belgium. I am no expert on Belgian history (to say the least!), but my reading indicates that the modern nation was "born" out of a rebellion in 1830. 1830 + 175 = 2005. That is about right, although in another topic I read the pen was produced in 2007. A minor discrepancy, to my thinking. I would therefore suspect that M. F. des Trixhes was a Belgian historical figure who played some significant role in the creation of modern Belgium. "Trixhes" is a Belgian geographic name, so I assume Francois or his family was from there. Any one who can shed light on these mysteries is invited to do so. Meanwhile ... Happy writing! David
  12. PenChalet

    Great Deals On Select Stipula Pens

    This week we have discounted the following Stipula pens at 40% Off while they last. Stipula Etruria Magnifica Collection Rollerball PensRetail: $175.00Sale: $105.00 available in 5 colors view details... Stipula Etruria Magnifica Collection Fountain PensRetail: $235.00Sale: $141.00 available in 2 colors view details... Stipula Model T Collection Ballpoint PensRetail: $135.00Sale: $81.00 available in 1 color view details... Stipula Model T Collection Rollerball PensRetail: $160.00Sale: $96.00 available in 2 colors view details... Stipula Model T Collection Fountain PensRetail: $265.00Sale: $159.00 available in 2 colors view details...
  13. Shavely Manden

    Anyone Used Stipula Israel 65?

    Has anyone used / does anyone have impressions of the Stipula Israel 65th anniversary LE? I can only find a single passing reference to it on FPN. Also, if anyone's used it, does it have an interchangeable nib?
  14. PenChalet

    50% Off Stipula Speed Fountain Pens

    We have the Stipula Speed Fountain Pens discounted at 50% Off while they last. We have several colors in different nib sizes. See selection below: This is a great price on the pen so order today before they are all gone: https://www.penchalet.com/fine_pens/...ntain_pen.html
  15. Hi, I was wondering if anyone in the community knows a way to service a Stipula Etruria Rainbow. any guidance and instructions are greatly appreciated!. thank you greatly Jack
  16. white_lotus

    Stipula Calamo Sepia

    Stipula makes a line of inks, one online shop had seven of their inks, another five. They don't seem to get much attention here on the forum. But I'm always interested in an ink named "sepia". They have big 70 ml bottles. This is my first bottle of theirs. There are old reviews here on FPN showing an ink with this name to be a muted gray-green. That is not what the ink currently is. The online shops correctly show the ink as a red-brown. It is nearly identical to Franklin-Christoph Brown in color, but very fast drying. The pictures here didn't quite capture the reddish hue here, and often just turned it dark. Maybe if I had a more modern iPhone I'd get better color capture. Perhaps someday. This ink washes red. It is not a replacement for PPM. There's nothing bad about this ink, but it is very similar to all the other red-brown inks out there. Not terribly water resistant.
  17. betweenthelens

    Le Stipula Davinci Samurai

    The LE Stipula DaVinci Samurai Review and photography by Laura Elizabeth Bullock Introduction The LE Stipula DaVinci Samurai was produced in a collaborative effort by music publisher Leeds Levy and Chatterley Luxuries’ Bryant Greer. Leeds and I have a mutual friend from the Big Apple Pen Club, Tim Ettenheim. Tim brought the pen to my attention and, along with Leeds, asked that I write a review of and photograph this unique pen, which is available for purchase at https://chatterleyluxuries.com/product/stipula-samurai-rose-gold-overlay-limited-edition-fountain-pen/ I am in no way affiliated with Stipula or Chatterley Luxuries and this review is a noncommercial effort. http://i1231.photobucket.com/albums/ee513/betweenthelens/IMG_7284.jpg Appearance and Design The barrel of this exquisite pen is transparent blue resin with rose gold vermeil overlay bonded permanently to solid sterling silver. The overlay is hallmarked in three places with 925 and a five-pointed star followed by 1770 and FI for Firenze. http://i1231.photobucket.com/albums/ee513/betweenthelens/IMG_7299.jpg The gorgeous overlay echoes the legendary tosei gusoku armor of Japanese samurai right down to the gilt kanamono used on the helmets, shoulder guards and plates. http://i1231.photobucket.com/albums/ee513/betweenthelens/IMG_7300.jpg The pen's trim is also rose gold vermeil as is the unique sword-like clip with the suggestion of a samurai at the top of the clip. http://i1231.photobucket.com/albums/ee513/betweenthelens/IMG_7314.jpg http://i1231.photobucket.com/albums/ee513/betweenthelens/IMG_7311.jpg The clear end of the blue resin barrel shows 0/18 as the pen is limited to 18 worldwide and this particular pen is a prototype. http://i1231.photobucket.com/albums/ee513/betweenthelens/IMG_7321.jpg Perhaps the most interesting and most unusual feature of the Samurai is its retractable nib that appears with a clockwise twist of the barrel through a half-moon shaped door bearing the Stipula name and disappears with a counterclockwise twist as it’s retracted and the door closes. http://i1231.photobucket.com/albums/ee513/betweenthelens/IMG_7326.jpg http://i1231.photobucket.com/albums/ee513/betweenthelens/IMG_7328.jpg http://i1231.photobucket.com/albums/ee513/betweenthelens/IMG_7330.jpg Finally, this Stipula pen features an interchangeable writing system. When the nib is retracted, the barrel pulled out and the universal cartridge or piston converter removed, the section and nib can be easily removed by applying light pressure to the section’s metal wings and gently pulling. http://i1231.photobucket.com/albums/ee513/betweenthelens/IMG_7309.jpg Construction and Quality The Samurai is extremely well made and hand-designed with superb attention to detail. Its sturdiness is apparent in its heft and solid construction. A firm grasp is required to remove the barrel and once the barrel is replaced, there is a satisfying, solid click. http://i1231.photobucket.com/albums/ee513/betweenthelens/IMG_7303.jpg The removable writing section is also of solid construction with a tab and hole mechanism to ensure its proper replacement without incurring damage to the nib. http://i1231.photobucket.com/albums/ee513/betweenthelens/IMG_7335.jpg Size The Samurai is 136-140 mm (5.35-5.51 inches) in length and the diameter is 16.1-18 mm (0.63-0.71 inches). Its weight is 61 grams (2.15 ounces). Its formidable size and girth are impressive. Because of this, it may be better suited to larger hands. However, this would not preclude usage by a woman. I am perfectly content using this pen and I can comfortably grip the barrel and write for an extended period of time. Nib and Performance This is a medium 14 kt. gold nib with the Stipula leaf logo in two places and a 585 gold mark, meaning the gold is near this percentage (58%) pure. http://i1231.photobucket.com/albums/ee513/betweenthelens/IMG_7331.jpg http://i1231.photobucket.com/albums/ee513/betweenthelens/IMG_7333.jpg The nib is not a flex nib; however, it does provide amazing line variation depending upon the angle at which the nib is used and how much pressure one exerts when writing. The paper I used to assess the nib’s performance included a Rhoda Webnotebook, L. Writing Paper made in Japan by Life Company, 60 lb. Fabriano sketch paper, a Moleskine lined Legendary Notebook, and 100 % cotton Crane Monarch sheets with Ecruwhite Kid Finish. The inks I used were J. Herbin Rouge Hematite, Waterman Florida Blue, Akkerman Passage Blauw, and Pelikan 4001 Violet. The Samurai performed well on all papers with all inks although the Moleskine did not provide quite the level of quality writing experience as the other papers. This paper paled in comparison to the similarly smooth, but higher quality, writing surfaces of the Rhodia and Life Company Japanese papers and there was even pleasant feedback on both the Crane and Fabriano papers. The pen performs better on higher quality, heavier papers but it must be mentioned that there was no skipping or hard starting on any of the papers with any of the inks. The pen performed well inked with the Pelikan 4001 Violet, the driest of the inks. There were consistent uniform color and even some subtle shading apparent. This pen was made for the very saturated J. Herbin Rouge Hematite with the extremely beautiful green-gold shading standing out and the rich color flowing freely. My Stipula Gladiator with medium nib is a wonderful pen; however, its nib doesn’t have the range of this Stipula Samurai and the Rouge Hematite in my Gladiator puts down a red line with no shading. I have to use a flex nib, such as the one on my Bayard LE 4 or the nib on my Morrison’s gold overlay ring top to see the shading. The Waterman Florida Blue (a wetter ink than the Pelikan 4001) and the Akkerman Passage Blauw (perhaps the wettest of the four inks) have a discernable flow, more so than that of the J. Herbin and especially more than that of the Pelikan 4001. Filling System The filling system utilizes a universal cartridge or piston converter, both of which are included with the pen. The converter took up the ink immediately. Cost and Value This pen retails for $1095. In my opinion, the pen is worth it. The quality and construction, the understated elegant design, uniqueness and outstanding performance are worthy enough to commandeer such a price. Conclusion This pen provides a truly luxurious writing experience. I’ve used it consistently for several days and for as much as an hour at a time. I’ve not experienced anything approaching fatigue or cramping, even owing to the pen’s size. If I were working a desk job, I would use this pen as a daily writer, however ostentatious it would appear; it’s that comfortable and that lovely with which to write. If one is looking to turn heads with a work of art that also happens to be a fountain pen, this is also the pen for you.
  18. Hello, Have you seen the latest interviews with these companiess? Interestingly Stipula was called Alba at the beginning and Aurora is building a huge pen museum. I wonder if anyone knows more about this. Some interesting pics from the factories. Especially the nib production steps i think. http://penficionado.thepengallery.com/ Louise
  19. The Stipula David Black Red Gold Trim Medium Nib Fountain Pen. Stipula presents David Black collection of pens dedicating to David, a historical figure and Michelangelo, who using his technical abilities, brought David into the good governance and safety of the Fatherland thus teaching us arrogance won’t survive in the face of courage. Red gold trim definitely adds in the outer looks! Fills via cartridge or converter. http://www.penboutique.com/p-15175-stipula-david-black-red-gold-trim-medium-nib-fountain-pen.aspx
  20. Stipula Passaporto - The 2015 special edition for Massdrop Massdrop recently closed a drop for a custom-manufactured Stipula Passaporto. I have one of the FPN LE Passaporto's from a couple years ago, and I have been thinking that a Passaporto would make a nice gift for a couple of my FP-using relatives. I had some concerns about changes in the pen design since the FPN LE's, especially the elimination of threading on the end of the barrel, making posting difficult. Massdrop's agreement with Stipula included specifications for threading and for metal connections between the section and barrel. This was encouraging. I ordered one, then ordered two more when the price became even more attractive. I received my first order a couple days ago. Here is a first look: There has been some concern regarding QA since before the recent Stipula reorganization, and some apparent problems with some of the Massdrop Passaportos reported on FPN. Mine showed no defects on visual inspection. I flushed the nib/feed well with a bulb syringe and installed a small standard cartridge of J. Herbin Perle Noire. Getting ink flow initially was a bit difficult, but with persistent cartridge squeezing, pen shaking, nib blotting, etc. flow commenced. Once started, flow was quite dry but consistent and satisfactory. With the J. Herbin ink and either Tomoe River or Rhodia paper, the pen writes quite smoothly. It is smooth enough to use for American cursive, but the ink flow is too restricted for rapid writing. For italic script, flow is adequate, and there is quite respectable thick/thin line differentiation, especially for such a narrow nib. (The photograph, as displayed on a computer screen, shows the difference as less than it is in reality.) For those unfamiliar with the Passaporto, it is very compact "pocket pen." It must be used posted to have sufficient length, I think, even for the smallest adult hands. Here, for comparison is the new Passaporto and the FPN LE Passaporto next to a more familiar Kaweco Al Sport: I ordered the Massdrop Passaporto with a 0.9 mm italic nib. My FPN LE Passaporto has a 1.1 mm italic nib. This may seem like a small difference, but the difference in height of minuscule letters would be 4.5 mm versus 5.5 mm, which is significant. The narrower nib will be better suited for the uses to which I intend to put this Passoporto, for example quick note taking, "to do list" editing, and the like. I plan to use this pen as an eye dropper filler. I do have some concern about corrosion of the metal connection between barrel and section. Advice about that would be appreciated. Happy writing! David
  21. Ok, some of you might remember the Summer of 2013 and our hunt for the OMAS MoMA, which ended in a fire sale at some of the german Manufactum sales-points - and a couple of happy FPN-members. I will make it short for not keeping you up for too long: there seems to be a new possibility with a different pen. As Manufactum in former times was dedicated to "the real cool stuff", they are right now on the way to "me too" - and they clean out their shops again. What I found this time is the Stipula DaVinci in two different models - black resin and ebonite in different colours. Most of them are "M", some are "1.1 Italic", all nibs are 14k, not titanium. Based on this I just ask: shall we do something like this again? To be honest: I already bought 4 of them... ... but I am sure they have at minimum again some 5 or 6 laying around. Resume: if this is interesting, let me know. And in general: this is not meant as a business sale or something like this - the thing in 2013 started and ended as (from my point of view) something like "friends help friends". If this is against the rules, feel free to eliminate this thread. It was not my idea to interfere with the guidelines of FPN. Ciao - Peter PS: they ask for 250,- Euro, independent from the model...
  22. Tadeusz

    Stipula Speed Fountain Pen

    Does anyone have this pen? I am unable to find reviews on it, but it seems to be on sale at a certain place. It is a piston filler with an innovative design, but I don't know much about the pen or how it functions. Does anyone have one of these that they would post about? Doesn't need to be a full review or anything, just a summary or quick snippet of your opinion on the pen: smoothness, ease of use, etc. Thanks! Tadeusz
  23. Stipula had discontinued production of the Passaporto. Massdrop members showed sufficient interest (800 people!) in this model that Stipula agreed to a special run, if enough folks commit. (I have committed to 3, if the lowest price is achieved.) Note that Stipula will produce the "original" version with steel threads and a threaded end for posting (like the FPN LE). 3 colors and various nibs, including a 0.9mm italic, are available. Here's a link: https://www.massdrop.com/buy/stipula-passaporto David
  24. I recently bought a Stipula Etruria and I am having difficulty filling it. I tried an international converter but this does not fit. Neither did an international (short) cartridge. The problem seams to be that the barrel is too narrow inside. I notice that the barrel has metal threading way up. You can just see this in the photo below. I have read here about converters and removable pistons. Can anybody explain what I need to do? This Etruria does not have the piston nob. It has gold trim and it has an 18K nib. I have attached a few photos if that helps.
  25. mbankirer

    Adding To My Italians...

    I pulled out my Pentrace 2004 Limited Edition that had been sitting for quite sometime, filled with PR Avocado (the newer formula) and it started right up! (Is Filcao still in business?) I have just added a Stipula Passoporto (the one I mentioned under the repair thread) and I did just order the Stipula Israel 65 as a gift to my husband.... All this got me thinking about my Italians....I have more than I realized! Delta (2), Filcao (3), Aurora(2), and Stipula (2)....





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