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  1. Sakura Fountain Pen Gallery generously sent me Robert Oster Red Clay. It is an ink in the inkArt.ink line ( http://www.inkartink.com/ ) They are available in 50 and 100 ml and have added UV protection. Red Clay is a a nice "muted" red. Clay can have a lot of different colors, but this looks for me like the red bricks used for building in the Netherlands. The ink shows shading and what I particularly like is the dark outline of the letters (see writing and dip pen). There is some black sheen. Behavior of the ink is good, like most Robert Oster inks, and especially the use with dip pen and for calligraphy is excellent, as expected for an Art ink The chromo shows three colors, 2 of them very distinct. Closest thing to the chromo is Shaeffer Skrip Red, but this red is far more brighter. I like the color and behavior of the ink, not only for art but also for writing.
  2. namrehsnoom

    Robert Oster Signature - Bronze

    Robert Oster Signature - Bronze Robert Oster is an Australian ink maker that is well-known for its unique range of colours. On his website, he describes our shared love quite eloquently: “Robert Oster Signature originates from one of the most famous wine producing regions of the world, the Coonawarra district of South Australia, an idyllic setting with great influence on the senses. There is my inspiration. It’s a joy to share it with you.” Well, we are certainly fortunate to have inspiring ink makers like Robert Oster to satiate our thirst for glorious inks. In this review, the center stage is taken by Bronze, a fascinating olive-green ink with a noticeable old-rose undertone that is present just behind the surface, and that gives the ink a really nice vintage look. The name “bronze” is spot-on for this Robert Oster creation – the colour reminds me of these ancient bronze pots with lovely patina you can find at your local museum. This is an ink that really stands out from the crowd – in a good way. The ink contrasts nicely with the paper, but – unfortunately – looks a bit flat when writing with an EF-nib. Starting with F-nibs though, the ink opens up and shows its character, with strong shading in the broader nibs. To show you the impact of saturation on the ink’s look & feel on paper, I made some scribbles where I really saturated portions of the paper with ink. This gives you a good idea of what the ink is capable of in terms of colour range. On heavily saturated parts, Bronze shifts from olive-green towards more of a brown-green colour, with those tantalizing old-rose undertones just beneath the surface (the scan seems to lose these old-rose undertones somewhat, but trust me – they are there, and they are what makes this ink so special). Like most Robert Oster inks, Bronze totally lacks any water resistance. Short exposures to water completely obliterate the text, leaving only some old-rose smudges. This is evident from the chromatography – the ink detaches easily from the paper, as can be seen in the bottom part of the chroma. The ink is reasonably smudge-resistant though… there are some greenish smudges when rubbing a line of text with a most Q-tip cotton swab, but the text itself remains perfectly readable. I’ve tested the ink on a wide variety of paper – from crappy Moleskine to high-end Tomoe River. On every small band of paper I show you:An ink swab, made with a cotton Q-tip1-2-3 pass swab, to show increasing saturationAn ink scribble made with an M-nib fountain penThe name of the paper used, written with a B-nibA small text sample, written with an M-nibDrying times of the ink on the paper (with the M-nib)Robert Oster Bronze behaved perfectly on all paper types, and even wrote surprisingly well on Moleskine paper (although with very noticeable show-through and bleed-through). The ink is equally at home on both white and more yellowish paper. While writing, the ink lays down a rather wet line, but still dries quickly within the 5 to 10 second range (with an M-nib). The initial wetness means that you have to look out for smudging while writing – as such it’s not an ideal ink for lefties. Inkxperiment - bronze landscape I’ve recently started to experiment with ink drawings, keeping things simple and more-or-less abstract due to my lack of drawing skills (which can use lots more practice). But I find it to be a fun extension of the hobby, and have found single-ink drawings a nice challenge. In this drawing I started with completely wet 300 gsm watercolour paper, and applied Bronze with a brush. For the sky I used lots of water while spreading the ink. The highlights in the sky were obtained by blending in some bleach (thank you Nick Stewart for pointing out the possibilities of using bleach on inks). With the background almost dry, I added in the trees, letting the ink spread a bit. When the paper was almost completely dry, I added the fence and some details to the trees. I wouldn’t call it a masterpiece ;-) , but the drawing does show what can be obtained with Bronze in a more artistic setting. ConclusionRobert Oster Bronze is a great olive-green ink with a strong vintage vibe – mostly due to the old-rose component that shimmers beneath the surface. The ink looks good in all nib types, and can handle even low-quality paper fairly well. Unfortunately, the ink has zero water resistance – but I can live with that. Overall, I liked Bronze a lot – it certainly stands out from the crowd. Recommended! Technical test results on Rhodia N° 16 notepad paper, written with Lamy Safari, M-nib Back-side of writing samples on different paper types
  3. A fantastic write-up by the people at NoteMaker (an Australian Stationary with products as unique as you are..). It finally answers the question we have been asking ourselves.. Who is Robert Oster? http://blog.notemaker.com.au/meet-designer-robert-oster-signature-inks/ C.
  4. visvamitra

    Robert Oster Lemon Grass

    Robert Oster is new player in fountain pen ink market. He operates through worldwide network of wholesalers. The inks are sold in 50 ml PET bottles with a tightly secure twist cap. I don't know who makes the inks for the shop, but the colors look interesting and fresh. At the moment Robert Oster inks are available in billion colors - I lost track how many. Sample of Lemon Grass was sent to me by Akszugor. The color is interestig. I like it. The ink feels dryish and lubrication could be better but, overall, it's not bad. Drops of ink on kitchen towel Software ID Color range Rhodia, Visconti van Gogh, fine nib Midori, Lamy Al-Star, Visconti van Gogh, fine nib Water resistance
  5. visvamitra

    Robert Oster Torquay

    Robert Oster is new player in fountain pen ink market. He operates through worldwide network of wholesalers. The inks are sold in 50 ml PET bottles with a tightly secure twist cap. I don't know who makes the inks for the shop, but the colors look interesting and fresh. At the moment Robert Oster inks are available in billion colors - I lost track how many. Sample of Torquay was sent to me by Akszugor. While the ink behaves well, I strongly dislike the color. Drops of ink on kitchen towel Software ID Color range Discovery copy paper, Kaweco Classic, medium nib Maruman, Lamy Al-Star, medium nib Midori, Lamy Al-Star, medium nib
  6. Federalist Pens

    The Federalist Pens Papers#10 (October)

    October Newsletter/Blog at Fed Pens: http://www.federalistpensonline.com/October-Update_b_32.html -Inktober (Discount/Shipping!) -New Pelikan Products -Robert Oster Frankly Blue! -Columbus Pen Show- Nov 3rd- 5th! (Attending- same location!) Thank You! Frank
  7. namrehsnoom

    Robert Oster Signature - Blue Denim

    Robert Oster Signature - Blue Denim Robert Oster is an Australian ink maker that is well-known for its unique range of colours. On his website, he describes our shared love quite eloquently: “Robert Oster Signature originates from one of the most famous wine producing regions of the world, the Coonawarra district of South Australia, an idyllic setting with great influence on the senses. There is my inspiration. It’s a joy to share it with you.” Well, we are certainly fortunate to have inspiring ink makers like Robert Oster to satiate our thirst for glorious inks. In this review, the stage is taken by Blue Denim. Catherine from Sakura provided me with a sample of this ink to play around with – much appreciated! This particular Robert Oster creation is a nice teal ink that is a very close relative of both Pelikan Edelstein Aquamarine and iroshizuku ku-jaku. It’s a teal colour that leans towards the blue side of the spectrum, which I really appreciate. The ink contrasts nicely with the paper, and works well with all nib sizes. I found this ink to flow well with superb lubrication – a real pleasure to write with. The ink also offers lots of shading, even in finer nibs. To show you the impact of saturation on the ink’s look & feel on paper, I made some scribbles where I really saturated portions of the paper with ink. This gives you a good idea of what the ink is capable of in terms of colour range. What really wows here is the beautiful reddish sheen that the ink exhibits – quite nice! If you use broad & wet nibs, you’re in for a treat. Like most Robert Oster inks, Blue Denim has no water resistance. Short exposures to water completely obliterate the text. All that remains are some unreadable smudges. This is evident from the chromatography – the ink detaches easily from the paper, as can be seen in the bottom part of the chroma. The ink also smudges easily, with bluish smudges on the page. The text itself remains very readable though. I’ve tested the ink on a wide variety of paper – from crappy Moleskine to high-end Tomoe River. On every small band of paper I show you:An ink swab, made with a cotton Q-tip1-2-3 pass swab, to show increasing saturationAn ink scribble made with an M-nib fountain penThe name of the paper used, written with a B-nibA small text sample, written with an M-nibDrying times of the ink on the paper (with the M-nib)Blue Denim behaved perfectly on all paper types, with just a tiny bit of feathering on the Moleskine paper. The ink is equally at home on both white and more yellowish paper. While writing, the ink lays down a rather wet line, but still dries quickly within the 5 to 10 second range. The initial wetness means that you have to look out for smudging while writing – as such it’s not an ideal ink for lefties. I also show the back-side of the different paper types at the end of the review. No troubles there, except with the Moleskine paper, which shows a bit of bleed-through. All in all, a well-behaving ink. ConclusionRobert Oster Blue Denim is a beautiful teal ink, that is at home on all types of paper. The ink looks good in all nib sizes, and offers a very smooth writing experience. Unfortunately, the ink has zero water resistance – the briefest touch of water completely obliterates your writing. If you already own other teals like Aquamarine or ku-jaku, you might pass on this one. There is however that alluring reddish sheen, that might make it worth your while to get a bottle… Technical test results on Rhodia N° 16 notepad paper, written with Lamy Safari, M-nib Back-side of writing samples on different paper types
  8. visvamitra

    Robert Oster Blue / Black

    Robert Oster is new player in fountain pen ink market. He operates through worldwide network of wholesalers. The inks are sold in 50 ml PET bottles with a tightly secure twist cap. I don't know who makes the inks for the shop, but the colors look interesting and fresh. At the moment Robert Oster inks are available in billion colors - I lost track how many. Sample of Blue Black was sent to me by Akszugor. The color is rather generic, but I liked this ink. It feels wet in my Kaweco Sport and the flow is very good. Lubrication could be better but the level we get is sufficient to enjoy writing. I wouldn't mind having more of this one. Drops of ink on kitchen towel Software ID Color range Discovery copy paper, Kaweco Classic, medium nib Maruman, Lamy Al-Star, medium nib Midori, Lamy Al-Star, medium nib Water resistance
  9. visvamitra

    Robert Oster Charcoal

    Robert Oster is new player in fountain pen ink market. He operates through worldwide network of wholesalers. The inks are sold in 50 ml PET bottles with a tightly secure twist cap. I don't know who makes the inks for the shop, but the colors look interesting and fresh. At the moment Robert Oster inks are available in billion colors - I lost track how many. Sample of Charcoal was sent to me by Akszugor. The color is dark purple. Don't expect true black. The flow is nice and other properties are satisfying. Drops of ink on kitchen towel Software ID Color range Oxford Optic, Hero, M nib Discovery 70 mgsm copy paper, Kaweco Sport Classic, BB Leuchtturm 1917, Kaweco Sport Classic, BB
  10. visvamitra

    Robert Oster Viola

    Robert Oster is new player in fountain pen ink market. He operates through worldwide network of wholesalers. The inks are sold in 50 ml PET bottles with a tightly secure twist cap. I don't know who makes the inks for the shop, but the colors look interesting and fresh. At the moment Robert Oster inks are available in billion colors - I lost track how many. Sample of Viola was sent to me by Akszugor. The color is uninspiring, the ink flows rather well although it may feel dryish. Also it lacks lubrication. Basically nothing interesting. Drops of ink on kitchen towel Software ID Color range Oxford Optic, Lamy Al-Star, medium nib Leuchtturm 1917, Lamy Al-Star, medium nib
  11. visvamitra

    Robert Oster Bronze

    Robert Oster is new player in fountain pen ink market. He operates through worldwide network of wholesalers. The inks are sold in 50 ml PET bottles with a tightly secure twist cap. I don't know who makes the inks for the shop, but the colors look interesting and fresh. At the moment Robert Oster inks are available in billion colors - I lost track how many. Sample of Bronze was sent to me by Akszugor. I must admit I enjoy the color because of it's complexity. The ink has very good flow and feels wet. As most RO inks it lacks lubrication. All in all I enjoy this one. Drops of ink on kitchen towel Software ID Color range Oxford Optic, Kevin & Sasa Crafts, EF nib Discovery 70 mgsm copy paper, Kevin & Sasa Crafts, EF nib Leuchtturm 1917, Kaweco Sport Classic, BB
  12. visvamitra

    Robert Oster Verde De Rio

    Robert Oster is new player in fountain pen ink market. He operates through worldwide network of wholesalers. The inks are sold in 50 ml PET bottles with a tightly secure twist cap. I don't know who makes the inks for the shop, but the colors look interesting and fresh. At the moment Robert Oster inks are available in billion colors - I lost track how many. Sample of Verde de Rio was sent to me by Akszugor. The color is fresh and nice. I like it a lot. The ink feels rather wet but, as most RO inks, lacks lubrication. There's no water resistance. Drops of ink on kitchen towel Software ID Color range Oxford Optic, Lamy Al-Star, medium nib Leuchtturm 1917, Lamy Al-Star, medium nib
  13. Robert Oster Signature - Marrone Mustard Robert Oster is an Australian ink maker that is well-known for its unique range of colours. On his website, he describes our shared love quite eloquently: “Robert Oster Signature originates from one of the most famous wine producing regions of the world, the Coonawarra district of South Australia, an idyllic setting with great influence on the senses. There is my inspiration. It’s a joy to share it with you.” Well, we are certainly fortunate to have inspiring ink makers like Robert Oster to satiate our thirst for glorious inks. In this review, I take a closer look at Marrone Mustard. Catherine from Sakura provided me with a sample of this ink to play around with – much appreciated! This particular incarnation of a Robert Oster ink is of the golden-brown variety. It’s a really nice light-brown colour with orange undertones. The ink contrasts nicely with the paper. It’s dark enough to make for a very readable text, yet not too contrast-rich in that it tries to dominate the page. Marrone Mustard is more at home in broader nibs. I didn’t like the way it looks in a EF nib – too flat and too light. In my opinion, this ink’s Goldilocks zone encompasses the M-B-1.1 range. Here the ink really shines, with great shading and the optimal expression of its colour range. With these wetter/broader nibs, you are rewarded with really good-looking writing. To show you the impact of saturation on the ink’s look & feel on paper, I made some scribbles where I really saturated portions of the paper with ink. This gives you a good idea of what the ink is capable of in terms of colour range. Like most Robert Oster inks, Marrone Mustard has no water resistance. Short exposures to water completely obliterate the text. All that remains are some orangy smudges. This is evident from the chromatography – the ink detaches easily from the paper, as can be seen in the bottom part of the chroma. The ink also smudges easily, with orange smudges on the page. The text itself remains very readable though. I’ve tested the ink on a wide variety of paper – from crappy Moleskine to high-end Tomoe River. On every small band of paper I show you:An ink swab, made with a cotton Q-tip1-2-3 pass swab, to show increasing saturationAn ink scribble made with an M-nib fountain penThe name of the paper used, written with a B-nibA small text sample, written with an M-nibDrying times of the ink on the paper (with the M-nib)Marrone Mustard behaved perfectly on all paper types, with just a tiny bit of feathering on the Moleskine paper. The ink manages to look good on both white and more yellowish paper. While writing, the ink lays down a rather wet line, but still dries quickly within the 5 to 10 second range. The initial wetness means that you have to look out for smudging while writing – as such it’s not an ideal ink for lefties. I also show the back-side of the different paper types at the end of the review. No troubles there, except with the Moleskine paper, which shows a bit of bleed-through. All in all, a very well-behaving ink. Conclusion Robert Oster Marrone Mustard is a beautiful golden-brown ink, that is at home on all types of paper. The ink is at its best in broader nibs, where it truly shows off its colour range and great shading. Unfortunately, the ink has zero water resistance – the briefest touch of water completely obliterates your writing. I consider Marrone Mustard an excellent choice for journaling, but be sure to use a wet M or B-nib to bring out the best from this ink. If you typically use EF/F nibs, this one is probably not for you. Technical test results on Rhodia N° 16 notepad paper, written with Lamy Safari, M-nib Back-side of writing samples on different paper types
  14. namrehsnoom

    Robert Oster Signature - Plumb Nut

    Robert Oster Signature - Plumb Nut Robert Oster is an Australian ink maker that is well-known for its unique range of colours. On his website he describes our shared love quite eloquently: "Robert Oster Signature originates from one of the most famous wine producing regions of the world, the Coonawarra district of South Australia, an idyllic setting with great influence on the senses. There is my inspiration. It's a joy to share it with you." Well, we are certainly fortunate to have inspiring ink makers like Robert Oster to satiate our thirst for glorious inks. This review focuses on Plumb Nut. A big thank you to Catherine from Sakura for providing me with a sample of this ink to play around with - much appreciated ! Plumb Nut is of the pink variety - an ink that is outside my usual comfort zone. This is not an eye-searing pink however, it leans more to the salmon pink variety with some red-brown undertones. As such it's a more muted wall-flowery type of colour that doesn't try to dominate the stage. Plumb Nut works well in all nib sizes. The ink is easy on the eye, with a good contrast on all paper types, even when using fine nibs. The ink shows some nice shading in broad nibs that really enhances the character of your writing. Such shading is mostly absent with finer nibs though, resulting in a flat and - in my opinion - uninteresting look. This ink is definitely at its best with wet and/or broad nibs. Unfortunately, Plumb Nut really hates water. You typically don't buy Robert Oster inks for their water resistance, but this one is rather extreme. The ink has absolutely zero water resistance. Short exposures to water completely obliterate your writing. This is evident from the chromatography - the ink detaches easily from the paper, as can be seen in the bottom part of the chroma. Surprisingly, the ink performed really well on the smudge test, where I rub a line of ink with a moist Q-tip cotton swab. Here, there was only some mild smudging of the line, leaving the text mostly undisturbed. I’ve tested the ink on a wide variety of paper – from crappy Moleskine to high-end Tomoe River. On every small band of paper I show you:An ink swab, made with a cotton Q-tip1-2-3 pass swab, to show increasing saturationAn ink scribble made with an M-nib fountain penThe name of the paper used, written with a B-nibA small text sample, written with an M-nibDrying times of the ink on the paper (with the M-nib)Plumb Nut behaved perfectly on all paper types, without any feathering. The ink's chemistry clashes with Moleskine paper with a sickly colour as a result. Really strange - and I previously observed a similar effect with Robert's Purple Rock. There must be some chemical component he uses that just doesn't work with Moleskine paper. This is a relatively fast drying ink on most papers, with drying times in the 10 second range. In my opinion, Plumb Nut looks best on white paper, and is less good-looking on more yellow paper. I also show the back-side of the different paper types at the end of the review. No troubles there, except with the Moleskine paper, which shows significant bleed-through. Since only masochistic fountain-pen lovers adore Moleskine paper, this is not much of a problem ;-) Conclusion Robert Oster Plumb Nut is a classy salmon-pink ink with a vintage vibe. The ink looks its best in wet/broad nibs on white and creamy paper. It's not so good-looking in fine nibs and on more yellow paper. Unfortunately, the ink has zero water resistance - the briefest touch of water completely obliterates your writing. I did like the way Plumb Nut looks in drawings, but as a writing ink it is not a good match for me : it's not really my type of colour, and I typically use F/M nibs, which are too fine to bring out this ink's character. But I'm sure there are others out there that this ink will speak to. Technical test results on Rhodia N° 16 notepad paper, written with Lamy Safari, M-nib Back-side of writing samples on different paper types
  15. CharlieAndrews

    Sheen Vs. Shading

    Hey y'all! I just recently acquired a bottle of Robert Oster Blue Water Ice from Pen Chalet, nicely priced too. I was interested in such a pretty blue ink, and was surprised when I used it and there were hints of red on the edges when it dried! After some research I discovered that there's a whole world of inks out there that "Sheen" and "Shade". Now, I know that those are two different things completely, and that shimmer is also a separate entity of its own, but I came here to ask y'all what you think. Which do y'all prefer? Sheen? Or Shading?
  16. (Since July, 2016) Robert Oster Signature- "Frankly Blue" Ink! Celebrating One Year in the US! We were proud to be the first US Dealer, and to debut Oster Inks at last year's DC Show! You can now Pre-Order this ink at our site! This is our own custom blend! This will be one of two EXCLUSIVE Inks we will have at the DC Show! (The other color (Black Violet) will be available thru other dealers after DC) http://www.federalistpensonline.com/-Robert-Oster-Inks_c_107.html Save more during our Anniversary Event! Thank You for your support! Frank Federalist Pens
  17. Fun and quick illustrations to show how versatile the Robert Oster Signature ink collection can be. Inks used: Peach, Ruby, Barossa Grape, School Blue, Yellow Sunrise, Purple Rock and Pinky with bleach detailing. Test art onto Bockingford 200lb watercolour paper using a dip pen with titanium zebra G flex nib for the bleach work and man made fibre watercolour brushes for ink work. Ink samples very kindly donated by Robert Oster
  18. julia239

    Robert Oster Caffe Crema

    This ink has potential, but the lubrication isn't great. I felt rushed using it because even brief pauses resulted in false starts. It really didn't feel like I was using a Robert Oster ink. This review was done from a sample, so perhaps that affected the lubrication in some way. The color & shading are interesting. The sheen is so-so & I couldn't get a good picture of it, but I tried to describe it. There is more feathering on the Original Crown Mill than I realized - not very much, but I don't recall there being any when I did the review. Maybe it settled in to the paper as it dried?
  19. Robert Oster BLUE SEA This Oster color you know for sure. This was my first Oster. Blue ink bore me relatively fast, but I have several types to which I return. Blue Sea is one of them.That's how I imagine the waters surrounding Australia. The color is well saturated, with a hint of turquoise. It works perfectly in thin lines as well as in wider. Here I use it in nibs: Sailor H-M and Bexley's stub. Shading is awesome. And shining is also present! The drying time is about 13 seconds od Rhodia dotpad, on other papers shorter. Good flow.Ink works well in fountain pens, I had the opportunity to use it for a long time. It's safe. Blue comparisons on Clairefontaine. Here's a sample on Filofax notebook and Oxford. Enjoy!





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