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  1. Madak

    Platinum Pigmented

    Any one mixed Platinum Pigmented inks to get a nice dusky or voilet purple? Thinking 2:1 Rose Red and Blue. But know subtle hues can throw off color to a gray. Wanting to research before spending 40 (or 60 if need add Carbon Black to darken) plus dollars. Thanks, Madak
  2. visvamitra

    Kwzi Liquid Words 2018 Le Ink

    As some of you may know Poland is one of biggest exporters of cosmetics, furniture and fruits. But we also have inks. Or, to be more precise, one ink maker – KWZI. Konrad offers handmade inks in more than sixty colors. You can check his website here. Liquid Words is LE ink brewed for participants of polish Pen Show 2017. The ink is heavily saturated and was available for short time and in limited quantity. Flow: This ink is wet and dense. It flows well, I haven't experienced any hard starts or skipping.. Saturation: well saturated ink. There are stronger purples on the market, but for me, this level of saturation works fine. Lubrication: good and pleasant. Drying time: It can take a while, depending on the nib you use. 15-20 seconds on Rhodia, 5 – 8 seconds on absorbent paper. Feathering: present on bad quality papers. Bleedthrough: experienced only on Moleskine (crappiest paper ever) Water resistance: nope. Drops of ink on kitchen towel Color ID Color range Fabriano, Kaweco Classic Sport, medium nib Field Notes, Lamy Al-Star, medium nib Velin Paper, Lamy Al-Star, medium nib Water resistance
  3. These inks will be part of the fade test. Here are the current inks compared. http://www.sheismylawyer.com/2018-Ink/2018-05/slides/2018-05-03_Ink_1.jpg Much to my surprise, you can see some bleed through. http://www.sheismylawyer.com/2018-Ink/2018-05/slides/2018-05-03_Ink_2.jpg
  4. MONTEVERDE MULBERRY NOIR Monteverde Mulberry Noir is part of the new series of Monteverde inks called the "Noir" series. It is a nice dark purple shade which leans towards blue without being over-saturated. The ink is well behaved in the pens that I have used it in and flowed nicely from the nib. It does have some lubrication. It is reasonably quick drying, yet seems to have a bit of water resistance (I unintentionally soaked the page in water for 30 minutes. The letters were quite readable although blurred. The page fell apart when taking it out of the water). This first review is a scan which really brings out the purple. The next is a photo taken under LED lighting. I think this is more consistent with the actual color. This is written on Tomoe River paper: This is written on Rhodia paper:
  5. DEATRAMENTIS PEARL VIOLET This lovely ink is one of my top 5 favorite inks ever. This is made by DeAtramentis inks. They are hand-made in Hachenburg, German by Dr. Franz-Josef. The inks are completely hand-made, with all aspects done manually in their manufacturing center. The dyes used are high quality from well established European companies that include BASF and Bayer, meeting high European standards. The inks could be considered traditional, although DeAtramentis does make scented and other kinds of special inks including permanent inks and most recently "shimmer-types", and makes a variety of ink colors resembling great European beverages including fine wines, whiskeys and beer. DeAtramentis has a wide selection of colors to please every eye, although not all colors are sold in every country. The bottles are heavy dark glass which contain 35 ml of ink, deep enough and with a large enough opening for large pens. Prices for the standard ink are about $12.95 in the U.S. When I made my return to fountain pens several years ago, DeAtramentis inks were some of the first inks that I tried. Ever since then, they make up a significant portion of my ink collection. But of all the DeAtramentis inks, Pearl Violet is probably my favorite. It is a lovely shade of purple, leaning toward pink on the light side and grey on the dark side. I love the shading variation of this ink on the various papers that I use it on. On cream color paper, it has almost an antique feel, evocative of Victorian times - of lovely ladies with parasols and gentlemen with top hats. On bright white it is a joyful color reminding me of the first tulips of spring. I love the color of this ink. But what I love most about the ink is the way it behaves. In almost every pen that I own, this ink helps the pen perform to its very best - whether it be a very dry Chinese pen or my wet and wild Italix oblique italic pen. Most recently, I filled my Montblanc 144 with this ink for the first time. This Montblanc is a bit finicky in many respects, like you would expect from a fine Parisian lady. In fact, I had not found a really good ink for this pen . . . until I filled it with Pearl Violet. That's it . . . end of story. This is the ink for this pen. And just in the nick of time. I was seriously contemplating selling the pen because it seemed too fussy about inks and paper. Well, now this pen hums . . . yes hums. You know what I mean . . . when a pen is just happy with life. And that makes me happy as well. O.K. . . . o.k... here are the scans. Water Test: Right was treated with water drops left on the page for 5 minutes, then blotted. The scan above is the closest to the real color. This is made on my portable ScanSnap which is the best of my scanners in terms of color accuracy. The following two scans are done on my HP printer/scanner, which does a moderately reasonable job. Note the differences of the ink on the Rhodia paper, which is not as bright white as the HP copy paper above. But also notice the beauty of this ink on the cream colored Tomoe River paper. As you can see, this is not a heavily saturated ink. But it behaves very well on all papers that I have used it on, with little feathering, bleedthrough or showthrough except when the ink is used in really wet pens and pools. I can not say enough good things about this ink. BUT, it does have a couple of things against it. It is not water resistant. It does have some water resistance, leaving some remnants of readable letters behind. And it does not sheen... not even on Tomoe River paper. While I like sheen in some inks, for me it is not an important feature for an everyday ink. This is likely not an ink that you would in a formal business setting. I do use it for my business for markups, note taking, etc. But I don't use it for meetings with clients and signing documents. I have noted that in much older reviews, the reviewers stated that this ink is dry. I have not found that to be the case with my last two bottles, which were purchased in the last couple of years. I would consider it to be a moderately wet ink in most of my pens.
  6. Akkerman #14: Parkpop Purper Akkerman inks are made by P.W. Akkerman in The Hague. Akkerman inks have unique bottles that make filling pens very easy. This review is based off a sample that I purchased several months ago and I am just now getting around to trying. My overall impression is very favorable. The ink is not lubricated, but flows nicely and behaves well overall. But what really sets this ink apart is the sheen! I had seen some sheen when I wrote in my journal (MD Midori) and really saw sheen when I wrote a letter today. But I was hugely surprised to see so much sheen on the HP copy paper that I wrote this review on. My overall score is 8/10, with such great sheen! Thank you, KaB and lapis for your assistance to correct my typing blunders! I do appreciate it!
  7. Who is William Henry Perkin? The discoverer of Mauveine - the first synthetic organic dye. Made from aniline. Guess what? Most inks today are made from aniline dyes. What color is Mauveine? Purple. I thought this was pretty cool. Serendipity. Kind of like Sir William Henry Perkin's discovery. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Henry_Perkin https://www.forbes.com/sites/kionasmith/2018/03/12/mondays-google-doodle-celebrates-chemist-sir-william-henry-perkin/
  8. Please feel free to read my ink review: https://drpenfection.tumblr.com/post/170472057950/ink-review-franklin-christoph-ink-18-philly Also, please let me know if you have any problems with the above link. Is this inconvenient? I would appreciate your thoughts. I decided to post this on Tumbler as I thought it might be easier for photo posting. Your comments would be appreciated.
  9. thacky

    The Right Blurple Ink

    I have been endlessly searching for the perfect blurple ink.I want an ink that when dry looks blue but is also purplish. I live in an area where there are sadly no pen stores that sell fountain pen ink. I have tried relying on samples shown online but when I receive an ink it is either too blue or too purple. The closest to what I want is Private Reserve Tanzanite. Tanzanite is a shade or two too purple. Does anyone have any suggestions of an ink that is slightly more blue, barely more blue, than Tanzanite? Inks that I am looking at online are: J. Herbin Eclat de Saphir(seems too blue in some pictures and too purple in others) De Atramentis Sapphire(seems close but maybe slightly too blue) Diamine Imperial Blue(same problem as with pictures of Eclat de Saphir) Diamine Sapphire Blue(seems too blue in pictures that I have found) Of course screen color calibration could show the wrong color as my screen has been off with the inks that I have tried which all looked perfect until I got them and used them. I have tried Private Reserve Cosmic Cobalt(too blue) and Private Reserve Electric DC Blue(too blue), Pilot Iroshizuku Asa-Gao(once again too blue), Private Reserve Tanzanite(close but slightly too purple). Thank you in advance.
  10. white_lotus

    De Atramentis Alexander Hamilton

    I got this ink a while back. Belatedly worked a review, and only recently took photos. I switched camera apps on the iPhone and I think the color here is better. But at last, I review an ink that everyone can buy! DeAtramentis inks are readily available. They have a wide selection made even wider by customizing the labels representing famous and infamous figures. The Alexander Hamilton ink is the exact same ink as DeAtramentis Aubergine, so it says on the bottle. This is a popular ink due to the resurgence of interest in its namesake due to a certain Broadway play. So it sometimes is out of stock depending upon your source. But the ink itself is really nice. It's a great color. I don't know how water resistant this color might be. My test was on a fairly absorbent paper, but water allowed some seepage of color to the verso. And it tends to spread and bleed. The ink held up fairly well to running 4 oz of water over it. But my general rule is that unless an ink is stated as being "permanent" or "waterproof" it probably isn't though some inks have more water resistance than others. This could be one such under the right circumstances. The color isn't quite as muted as in the pics. It was difficult to get images where the ink didn't just show as black. It's not a bright purple at all, definitely muted. Also quite dark, almost as dark as Sailor Bungbox Ink or Witch, but it doesn't go to black. This pen is very wet, and so some show through and a little bit of bleed through was experienced on more absorbent papers. A finer nib, less wet, may not have these minor issues. Buy it for the great color though. Pen: Edison Premiere (F-steel) Papers: MvL=Mohawk via Linen, TR=Tomoe River, Rhodia=Rhodia 90g ivory. Camera: iPhone 7 using Camera+ app
  11. Ink Review : Diamine Händel (Music Collection) Pen: Lamy Safari, M-nib Paper: Rhodia N°16 notepad 80 gsm Review London, summer of 1727. “I have been commissioned to write an anthem for the coronation ceremony of my benefactor Prince George – but what to use as a theme? Now, while attending mass in Westminster Abbey, my eye is drawn to the minister’s vestments. A whirlpool of dusty red and purple shades in the muted light of the cathedral. Ah… this setting inspires my muse. I see the theme of my anthem now… Zadok the Priest anointing King Solomon. Yes… that will be it.” In 2015 Diamine released the Music Collection, a set of 10 subdued ink colours named after well-known composers. In this review, we take a look at Händel. After the above introduction, you're sure to remember that this is a dusty red-purple ink. Diamine Händel is a muted purple ink, with a heavy red undertone as is obvious from the chromatography. The ink works really well in fine nibs – well lubricated, and good contrast with the paper resulting in an easy read. This is one ink that I actually like more in EF, F and M, than in the broader nibs. With broader nibs, the shading becomes very prominent and the red undertones of the purple colour become much more visible. I personally prefer my purples without too much red, so this makes the ink less attractive to me. Below you can see what the ink looks like when heavily saturated. I really poured the ink on Tomoe River paper and let it dry up. This gives you an idea of the ink's behaviour when used in very wet & broad nibs. Händel behaved really well on all the papers I tested – with only a touch of feathering and bleed-through on the Moleskine paper. Drying times varied widely from 5 seconds on absorbent paper, to 20 seconds on more glossy papers (all with M-nib). The ink’s look & feel is fairly consistent across paper types, and the result looks good on both white and more yellow paper. The ink has no water resistance to speak of – even short exposure to water will obliterate your writing. Diamine Händel is a nice muted purple, that looks great in finer nibs. Personally I’m not a fan of the strong red undertones in this ink, but your preferences may vary. Technically, Händel behaves very well on all types of paper. Just be aware that this ink has zero water resistance, so probably not a good ink for the workplace. My overall score: B+ Technical test results on Rhodia N°16 notepad paper using a Lamy Safari
  12. truthpil

    Diamine Cornflower Ink Review

    Hello again to all my FP friends, [This review has been sitting on my desk for months and I finally got around to posting it. Stay tuned for a comparison of Diamine Cornflower and Penbbs #116 Cornflower.] Diamine needs no introduction on this board. Suffice it to say that they have been making inks for over a century and produce many, many beautiful hues, a lot of which are prone to feathering and bleed through on everyday office paper. This ink up for review is from Diamine’s Flower Series. It is named after the cornflower (centaurea cyanus) which can be various shades of blue or lavender. I’ve never seen the flower in person, but by just comparing with various photographs online, the ink looks like a pretty good match to the flower. Diamine Cornflower is a deep and very saturated blue with a dash of purple. This ink dries quickly on absorbent paper, but has an average dry time on nicer papers. Sheening is nice and shading possible with wet nibs on good paper. It can be quite a stunning color with the write combination. Unfortunately, this ink’s downfall as a daily work ink is its tendency to feather and bleed through. Although feathering with finer nibs wasn’t too bad on copy paper, even the Japanese fine nib produced noticeable bleed. Water resistance is passible; a dark purplish line remains legible. This is a lovely vibrant color that reminds me of a dark counterpart to Noodler’s Baystate Blue. The color is also standard enough that it could be used in most professional environments. They only thing that keeps me from buying a bottle is that the feathering and bleed through make it impossible to use on any paper I would run into outside the house. However, if you like saturated, slightly purplish dark blues and mostly use good paper, then this is not an ink you’ll want to miss. *A special thanks to lapis for sending a sample of this ink to me! Pens used (in order): 1. Pilot 78G Fine 2. Lamy Safari Broad 3. Pilot Plumix Italic 4. Noodler’s Nib Creaper Flex 5. Hero 5028 1.9mm Stub Swab Paper Towel Drop 80gsm Rhodia Tomoe River *Many thanks to Lord Epic for kindly sending me some of this paper! Check out that subtle sheen! 70gms Deli Copy Paper Moleskine Water Resistance Comparison (More blues to be added later) Thanks for reading! SDG
  13. Amanda

    Sheening Purple Ink Mix

    A saturated, slightly dusty purple with strong gold sheen(the writing samples below were from a fairly dry pen). Not much shading but diluting with water and using a wetter pen may bring it out. I've had it in my pen for 2 days and the ink doesn't seem to be doing anything strange, not too sure about staining but none of the inks used in the mix usually stains much. I don't have the exact ratio but it's mostly pilot iroshizuku Yama budo with some shin-Kai and blue denim(Robert oster), possibly 4:1:1. Lubrication:4/5 Flow:4/5 Dry time:4/5 Water resistance:3/5(runs but definitely readable) No bleedthrough or feathering, slight show through on the copier paper. Sorry for the sloppy photos, I did try to take them in different lighting situations. I might try diluting it or playing with the ratio if anyone's interested. 😊
  14. Honeybadgers

    Nemosine Alpha Centauri

    Being a huge sci-fi and space buff, when Nemosine launched a line of ten inks all with space themes, I couldn't help but buy them all. Unfortunately, Goulet sold out of this particular ink (they have at the time of this writing, restocked it today) so I was forced to buy from Nemosine directly. They billed me immediately but never shipped. I sent two emails, both going unresponded, but two full weeks later they shipped (I presume they were simply out of stock, but a simple email letting me know would have been great when I had contacted them twice) and I was pleased to see that they tossed in a free M nib singularity! So delay and poor communication aside, I am happy with my order. I'm even more happy with this ink. It's GORGEOUS. A lovely, dusky purple with some moderate, yet very present gold sheen, good manners on awful paper, moderate shading, good flow, and some water resistance. I have yet to get to the rest of the inks beyond the Aeolis Palus Red and Blue Snowball Nebula twinkle, but thusfar, they're all winners, and this in particular is just fantastic. Dry times seem a little long for rhodia, but on anything more absorbant, dry times are near-instant. The boxes are simple, with a small sticker mentioning the name of the ink, which is made in Slovenia. The nemosine name is present in raised letters. Not the most interesting box, but for $8/bottle and a really lovely bottle itself, I'm not complaining. The geographical coordinates of Nemosine's bottling location is indicated on the bottle (a street in Pittsburgh, PA), along with a nice, clean bottle with a wide mouth and a great, simple label. I give the bottle design high marks, it's thin enough to be quite usable until it gets low, and I enjoy the shape, giving the ink the appearance of floating. It's no mont blanc or iroshizuku bottle, but it's quite high up on my list of favorite bottle designs. The lid screws securely and doesn't get the inner seal stuck like a sailor or pilot bottle. 35ml of ink is a somewhat small amount, but I do appreciate the low price of $8 per bottle, and I'll probably pick up a second bottle of the colors I like most. Now on to the ink - all of my Nemosine reviews will have some sort of space or sci-fi theme. First I thought of was Apollo 13 and Tom Hanks's propensity for calamity while traveling. This is a great everyday ink, saturated enough to be clearly visible, well behaved in all the nibs of my CP-1. I was quite surprised at the water resistance. the water sat there for a good 20-30 seconds and the lines are very legible. I like how the sheen kind of permeates all of the letter in a very subtle manner. it's absolutely lovely, without being over the top. The color honestly reminds me of a duskier version of Lamy Dark Lilac. I love vivid, bright colors, but this slightly muted lavender is just perfect for me. When you're printing with a wet nib, the sheen is much more pronounced. Another shot of that lovely, pervasive and mild gold sheen showing up all through the ink, not just the edges. And a sample of the absolute worst paper I've ever been able to find. It's a few steps above toilet paper, and yet the feathering is quite controlled in the very wet EF nib. Showthrough was minimal and slight bleedthrough. Bear in mind this paper is INSANELY thin and very, very bad. Highly, highly recommended. Thusfar all three I've tested have been knocked right out of the ballpark and will be used regularly.
  15. L'Artisan Pastellier Callifolio - Violet L'Artisan Pastellier is a small company in southern France that specialises in natural pigments, and offers customers authentic and reliable products in beautiful colours based on mineral or vegetable pigments. In a collaboration with Loic Rainouard from Styloplume.net, the chemist Didier Boinnard from L'Artisan Pastellier created the line of Callifolio fountain pen inks. These pastel-coloured inks are traditionally crafted, and can be freely mixed and matched. Overall these inks are only moderately saturated, and have low water-resistance. The inks were specifically designed to work well with all types of paper, and all types of fountain pens. Being pastel-tinted, these inks have a watercolour-like appearance, and are not only fine inks for journaling, but are also really excellent inks for doodling & drawing. I only recently discovered them, and they are already the inks I gravitate towards for personal journaling. In this review, Callifolio Violet takes center stage: a springtime light-purple ink obviously named after the violet flower (aka viola of the Violaceae family of flowering plants). You can also think of the colour of lavender if you prefer. Violet is a fresh, lively and primarily beautiful looking ink. The ink gives me a playful feeling - perfectly suited for this late spring / early summer season. It is not too intrusive though, and in my opinion not only suited for personal journaling but also well adapted for notetaking at work. Be aware that this is a reformulated version of the older Callifolio Violet, and a totally different ink than the one previously reviewed by visvamitra (no golden glitter in this incarnation of the ink!). As far as I'm concerned, this ink doesn't need a golden shimmer to shine. It's a beauty in its own right. The ink works well in all nib sizes but is a bit undersaturated in drier fine nibs. It shows some really nice shading in the broader nibs, from light to dark violet. I'm not a fan of too bold a shading (with a large difference between light and dark) - here the contrast between the light & dark portions of the text is obviously present, but remains subdued with an aesthetically pleasing look. I really like it ! This flowery ink really blossoms in wetter nibs where it leaves a much more saturated and darker-looking line, which looks amazing. Be sure to find a wet pen to use with this ink - you'll be well rewarded with the eye-pleasing result. Below you'll find a writing sample with my drier Safari M and B nib, compared to the wet golden M-nib of my Lamy Dialog 3. The difference is obvious On the smudge test - rubbing text with a moist Q-tip cotton swab - Violet behaved perfectly with almost no smearing. Water resistance is remarkably good ! This is the first Callifolio ink I've used that is nearly water-proof. A 15-minute soak in still water posed no problem at all. Running tap water caused some purplish smudging, but the text remained perfectly readable. This water resistance makes Callifolio Violet all the more suited for the workplace, earning an extra plus from me. The ink's water resistance is demonstrated clearly in the chromatography, which shows that most of the ink remains in place when coming into contact with water. It also clearly shows that this is a one-pigment ink. I've tested the ink on a wide variety of paper - from crappy Moleskine to high-end Tomoe River. For the Callifolio reviews, I'm using a new format to show you the ink's appearance and behaviour on the different paper types. On every small band of paper I show you: An ink swab, made with a cotton Q-tip1-2-3 pass swab, to show increasing saturationAn ink scribble made with an M-nib fountain penThe name of the paper used, written with a B-nibA small text sample, written with an M-nibDrying times of the ink on the paper (with the M-nib)Callifolio Violet behaved perfectly on all the paper types I used, without any feathering even on the lower quality papers in my test set. Drying times are fairly short in the 5-10 second range on most papers. In my opinion, the ink looks best on true white paper, and is a bit less eye-pleasing on more yellow paper. I find it great-looking on the readily available Rhodia paper. At the end of the review, I also show the back-side of the different paper types, in the same order. The ink behaved superbly on all paper types. Only with Moleskine there was a tiny bit of bleed-through - given that Moleskine is a notoriously bad paper for fountain pens, this was really surprising (in a good way). Violet is a really well-behaving ink. Conclusion Callifolio Violet from L'Artisan Pastellier is a wonderful ink, perfectly suited for late spring / early summer. I am really impressed by the ink's performance on different paper types, as well as its near-perfect water resistance. But primarily I am totally charmed by the ink's colour, which looks fresh & beautiful, but is still not too out-of-bounds for an office setting. A great-looking ink for any occasion ! You should really try it out for yourself ! Technical test results on Rhodia N° 16 notepad paper, written with Lamy Safari, M-nib Backside of writing samples on different paper types
  16. There are more formal, and better reviews already posted, but as I have found the Purple I was looking for, here are a few thoughts: Note, that I'm not one of those weird people who like dry pens. I like pens that gush - both pens used are pretty wet writers. There's a reasonable amount of shading under that gold. Comes in a 50ml bottle. Not an expensive ink, but a little dearer than the excellent value standard Diamine Inks. Dry times are very paper and pen dependent, but I was getting smudging on most papers up to the 20 second mark (and beyond on less absorbent papers). Do a search - there are better reviews on here. I love it, and with a fine nib would happily use at work even with the odd sparkle. My fingers look like I've spent the day blackberry picking.
  17. Hey, I really hate to open another topic on Baystate Blue. But I really don't know how to find ALL the BSB threads that are available, and check whether this has already been comented on (For what is worth, I have searched as best I could via Google, here and elsewhere, but I couldn't find an appropriate thread about this). So then, I thought I might ask everybody a question: Does YOUR (sample of) Baystate Blue turn purple on plain, white, copy paper (80-90 gsm), and predominantly on such paper? I don't mean a hint or a tinge of purple - rather bright, saturated, vibrant ... purple. To put a bit more context into it, I must say I just received my 3 oz. bottle of THE ink (ordered on Amazon, shipped by the manufacturer) a few days ago. I made sure to clean the pen extra well (flushed until water ran clear, THEN flushed with minor concentration dish-soap solution and left it in for 24hrs., THEN flushed until water ran clear of bubbles, and left another 24 hrs. with clean water in it, AND finally flushed dry, and left another 24hrs. to ... well, dry out, with nib resting on absorbent tissue paper - so, I guess the pen was .. clean), then loaded it with THE stuff. In case anybody is wondering, the pen is a black HERO 616 mini version with an M nib - I had well researched this ink beforehand (but apparently, still not well enough), so I knew well enough to choose a cheap pen. So far (3 days after) the pen behaves perfectly (with no melted plastic/feeder, or flow modification; it actually behaves better than with Diamine Blue Velvet in it; I do expect the rubber sac of the aerometric filler to be stained, but I couldn't care less; we'll see about the rest). And then I tried it on for size. First, on a glossy paper notebook - white (don't know what paper the supplier used, because the notebook is internal stationery at the HR firm I work at). And it came out ... purple. I felt my throat going dry. Secondly, on plain/cheap A4, 75gsm, ECF (Elementary Chlorine Free), Unpunched, Ecolabel copy paper - obviously, white (generic brand, nothing to do with printer manufacturers). And it came out ... purple. I was gutted. Not far from crying (not really, but still...), considering how many inconvenient properties and risks I am ready to put up with, just for this color. As in this BLUE color, not purple color! Then I needed to scribble something really quick, and the first paper that came to hand was the back of a store receipt (so thin, thermal paper, I would say, and also white), and the closest instrument at hand was the BSB pen. And what do you know - it came out as the perfect, pure, intense and bright cobalt blue I had thought I was buying. Exactly that! Amazed at my discovery, I started scribbling "Test Color" on every paper I had at hand - which means that now I have quite a few books and book covers scribbled on their last page in BSB. And the color stayed blue (albeit with some hints of purple in some cases, but which are BARELY discernible). Also, I checked ALL my results the following day, in plain daylight (on a beautiful sunny day, around noon). And they were unchanged: my (sample of) ink is purple on some papers, and the proper blue on others. And some papers are white, others are cream, and others plain yellow. Thus, it seems that my BSB reacts with the paper and changes hue, for I can think of no other explanations. Now, I know what many will say: Rhodia, Clairefontaine, Tomoe River, etc. And that's all fine - to each his own, but I am not really a fountain pen afficionado, nor do I plan on becoming one (I have only 3 inks, and ... let's see, erm... 7 fountain pens, and I really want to stay at this level). I really place practicality above tastes, and I consider it dandy enough to be using a fountain pen (in spite of the extinct-species/wolly-mammoth looks I get from some...), that I most certainly won't carry Tomoe River pads with me to the meeting room. Nothing wrong with those that will, as I was saying above. My point, however, to anybody reading this, is that performance on plain copy paper is THE deal breaker for ME, as I won't change paper except entirely accidentally. So it doesn't really help me to know how the ink performs on those FP dedicated papers (actually, I already do considering how much research I put into this color), and/or that I should change stationery. And the color is the deal-breaker part of the performance - as I was saying previously, I will put up with many things, but not with a different hue/color, because that makes it a different ink, actually. I have also read about reports that Noodler's inks have some relatively looser Q.C.s (i.e.quality controls), in that performance can vary from one batch to the another, within the same product line (for instance, different batches of BSB might behave differently). So then, I am well aware this could be a batch-related rather than a product-related problem. Being thus aware if that as well, I dare (after a mammoth post) phrase my question anew: Does YOUR (sample of) Baystate Blue turn purple on plain, white, copy paper (80-90 gsm), and predominantly on such paper? N.B.: for those who don't know/don't remember, would you be so kind as to test it a bit on some copy paper, if possible? I know it doesn't really do much for you, but I would really appreciate it, and it would mean A LOT to me to know whether I could still like this ink (that otherwise, I have to confess it, I would love in spite of all its other shortcomings... eh, true love i guess they call it, lol)
  18. MHBru

    Narrowing Down My Choices

    With great help from this group I think I have my ink choices down the the final three and appreciate your opinions. For starters I write with an M800 fine nib and this is mostly business notecards. I am currently writing with Iroshizuku Ken-peki and Tsuki-yo. The goal is to find something that can be used for biz but with a little more character that standard blues. 😊 The finalists are: Cara d'ache Ullra Violet Sailor Shigure (one reviewer said this clogged his pens but only one person made that comment) Diamine Damson Thoughts, opinions, hearsay and gossip are all invited. TIA!
  19. L'Artisan Pastellier Callifolio - Grenat L’Artisan Pastellier is a small company in southern France that specialises in natural pigments, and offers customers authentic and reliable products in beautiful colours based on mineral or vegetable pigments. In a collaboration with Loic Rainouard from Styloplume.net, the chemist Didier Boinnard from L’Artisan Pastellier created the line of Callifolio fountain pen inks. These pastel-coloured inks are traditionally crafted, and can be freely mixed and matched. Overall these inks are only moderately saturated, and have low water-resistance. The inks were specifically designed to work well with all types of paper, and all types of fountain pens. Being pastel-tinted, these inks have a watercolour-like appearance, and are not only fine inks for journaling, but are also really excellent inks for doodling & drawing. I only recently discovered them, and they are already the inks I gravitate towards for personal journaling. In this review I take a closer look at Grenat, one of several purple inks of the Callifolio series. You might think that this colour gets its name from the gemstone. But this is no Edelstein, and the other purple Callifolio inks are named after elegant wines, so my guess is that this colour is also named after the produce of grapes. Grenat is a nicely saturated dark purple, that is at home both with fine and broad nibs. It writes well, and is nicely saturated for a Callifolio ink. Grenat also shows some fancy shading, but you need broader nibs to get the full effect. With fine nibs the shading is almost absent – you need to look closely to notice it’s still there. I personally like dark purple inks, and Grenat is one that doesn’t disappoint. This is an ink that stands out, and that is “conventional” enough to be used at work without getting strange looks. It also helps that the ink can handle cheaper paper well –no high quality journals to be found at the IT department where I work, only printing paper ;-) Like all Callifolio inks, this one is also great for doodling & drawing. On the smudge test – rubbing text with a moist Q-tip cotton swab – Grenat behaved really well. There is some smudging, but nothing that impacts readability. Water resistance is very low though. Only a faint purple-grey residue remains, as is also shown in the chromatography. What is left on the paper is still decipherable, but will require some detective work. This is not an ink to use when water resistance is high on your list. I’ve tested the ink on a wide variety of paper – from crappy Moleskine to high-end Tomoe River. For the Callifolio reviews, I’m using a new format to show you the ink’s appearance and behaviour on the different paper types. On every small band of paper I show you: An ink swab, made with a cotton Q-tip1-2-3 pass swab, to show increasing saturationAn ink scribble made with an M-nib fountain penThe name of the paper used, written with a B-nibA small text sample, written with an M-nibDrying times of the ink on the paper (with the M-nib)Callifolio Grenat behaved perfectly on all the paper types, with no apparent feathering even on the lower quality papers in my test set. Drying times with an M-nib are mostly in the 10-15 second range, even less on the very absorbent paper. I like the ink best on white paper, and it looks absolutely fantastic on Fantasticpaper (pun intended). If you haven’t tried this paper yet, you owe it yourself to hunt around for this notebook. That fantastic paper really brings out the best from a fountain pen ink ! I also show the back-side of the different paper types, in the same order. The ink behaved perfectly with almost all paper types. Only with the Moleskine paper, there was significant show-trough and some minor bleed-through. All in all a really well-behaving ink. Conclusion Grenat from L’Artisan Pastellier is a fine dark purple ink, that is suited for all occasions, and works with any paper you care to use it on. The ink writes nicely saturated even in finer nibs, and shows some pleasant shading in broader nibs. A great ink for note-taking at work – dark purples are conventional enough to be used in such a setting. I really enjoyed using this ink, and can heartily recommend it. Technical test results on Rhodia N° 16 notepad paper, written with Lamy Safari, M-nib
  20. white_lotus

    Sailor Maruzen Nihombashi Murasaki

    Not so long ago a message appeared in my inbox offering some inks from Japan. Of course this excited me, as these were re-issues of previous Limited Edition inks made for the Maruzen department store in the Nihombashi district of Tokyo. These inks are only available at the store, so they are very difficult to obtain, even more so than the usual Sailor shop-exclusive inks. This particular ink is a rich, deep purple or deep grape hue. It has a heavy dye load, so it's not really very shady. But it has quite a bit of sheen on Tomoe River paper. The ink dries fairly quickly. The reason to have this ink is for it's color. It's just very rich. The flow and lubrication were very good. While taking more effort than usual to completely flush out the pen, there did not appear to be any staining on the converter. The ink is not waterproof, and really doesn't have any water resistance other than the fact of a lot of dye. This spreads everywhere when wet. I have no idea if this ink is actually available even though it was only released perhaps a month ago or so. I don't know how many bottles were produced and available, whether any announcements were made about the release, or if any bottles were left at the end of the day. The Sailor "vase" bottle was packaged in a tall Sailor box with a nice, heavy label. There was no label on the bottle itself or the cap. Apparently, only some bottles had hand-written labels. Pen: Edison Premiere (F-steel) Papers: MvL=Mohawk via Linen, TR=Tomoe River, Hij=Hammermill 28 lb inkjet, Rhodia=Rhodia 90g ivory. Camera: iPhone 7
  21. I've been lurking here for a long time but joined today as I saw Noodler's Tchaikovsky and Rachmaninov did not have ink reviews but are both in my possession. I love looking at ink reviews, even the rubbish ones, so I was inspired to make my own modest contribution. This ink is probably not a good choice for lefties, as it takes a really long time to dry (still smearing at 20 seconds), it's also not a good choice for non-FP papers as it feathers like a beast. BUT - it is oh, so, so very pretty. It shades so incredibly richly - like Apache Sunset where it's one colour at the top of a stroke, a completely different one at the base - and my pen seems to really like it. Also, it is freakishly water resistant. Even after 15 seconds and rubbing, the q-tip sample stayed squarely intact. Full page is a scan, close-ups are iPhone photos in natural light on Rhodia dotpad and Field Notes. You guys, the shading. http://images4-e.ravelrycache.com/uploads/MrsDrG/440305860/_medium2.jpeg
  22. airline0

    David Oscarson Les Quatre Couleurs

    David Oscarson Les Quatre Couleurs The four suits now used in most of the world – Spades, Hearts, Diamonds and Clubs – originated in France about 1480. The Spade represents nobility or aristocracy; the Heart represents the Church or Clergy; the Diamond represents merchants or the wealthy and the Club represents peasantry with its reference to clover, or the food of swine. The Quatre Couleurs Collection incorporates multiple levels of guilloché engraving and a combination of translucent and opaque hard enamel. The entire body of each pen is first cut down to the level of the background, leaving the outer and inner lines of the four suits and decorative filigree motif in high relief. Translucent and opaque enamels are repeatedly kiln-fired and filed by hand, resulting in the beautiful and enduring finish of true Hard Enamel. For inquiries email us at orders@airlineintl.com
  23. airline0

    David Oscarson Les Quatre Couleurs

    David Oscarson Les Quatre Couleurs The four suits now used in most of the world – Spades, Hearts, Diamonds and Clubs – originated in France about 1480. The Spade represents nobility or aristocracy; the Heart represents the Church or Clergy; the Diamond represents merchants or the wealthy and the Club represents peasantry with its reference to clover, or the food of swine. The Quatre Couleurs Collection incorporates multiple levels of guilloché engraving and a combination of translucent and opaque hard enamel. The entire body of each pen is first cut down to the level of the background, leaving the outer and inner lines of the four suits and decorative filigree motif in high relief. Translucent and opaque enamels are repeatedly kiln-fired and filed by hand, resulting in the beautiful and enduring finish of true Hard Enamel. For inquiries email us at orders@airlineintl.com





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