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  1. Dogpaws73

    A Conid On Its Way

    I finally got a few photos of my fountain pen from Belgium! This is going to be the longest week of waif ever!
  2. Hello to everyone. I found three really similiar looking fountain pens at my love's flat. I wonder what brand they could be or how old they must be, what their engraved subtitles refer to and so on. I took photos and luckily I can read small letters from close, so I can write what I found engraved on their tips. I will describe them according to their order on both photos, they are in the same order on both. On the left, no pattern: has a "Spirit of St Louis" graving at the bottom edge of the lid. On the point "Iridium point" and Germany are engraved with some nice spiral-decorated "frame" like pattern. It seems to be made of steel or some other lighter metal. Middle one, "stripy": on the tip it says "Radiant tipped" and "Made in USA". It has a very light, plastic feeling, especially the lid. The other two have more metal weight and feeling. On the right, with black shapes: on the tip it says "Matador", below that is an encircled "1" and below that is New York. The lid and body are made of metal. Thank you in advance Update: Found one more, it was in a Marksman titled case, but I'm not sure if it is one. It says "Iridium point" on the tip as well with the same nice swirls, but no "Germany" is engraved. It must have been a company gift, since there is a Philips logo on its lid. There is a very little figure on the golden clip which looks like a winged human figure standing on one leg and holding a stretch-out bow. Naturally the last photos with the dark blue pen count here.
  3. SGEPEN

    Unknown Fountain Pen

    Hello, I am currently assisting in an estate sale of a small collection of fountain pens. I have been able to find information on most of them, but this one eludes me. If anyone knows who this was made by or any other information about it, I would greatly appreciate it. Thank You
  4. NotFlashGordon

    Dubious Montblanc Pen - Pro's/con's List

    Hi Forum, My apologies that my first post is a "help identifying" post - but I hope to show that I at least put some initiative in researching this pen before approaching you guys. Pro: The pen has a serial number on the back of the top. The serial number begins with "HR"Con: After a thorough Google search, I cannot find any other pens that begin with "HR" - in fact, most of my search results are composed of Montblanc's Human ResourcesPro: Has Montblanc emblem on the top of the pen. Pro: Inside the clip it reads: "GERMANY" <signature>* Metal"Con: Doesn't say PIX.Pro: Newer pens do say metal. See: https://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/index.php/topic/249953-recent-changes-to-the-montblanc-classique-and-possibly-legrand-and-149/ and https://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/topic/252939-questionable-under-clip-engraving-on-a-new-mont-blanc-starwalker-resin-fineliner/Con: Has no "Montblanc ring" or "pen ring" Pro: It has a Montblanc case.Con: It is a bi-fold case and I cannot find another Montblanc bi-fold case anywhere.Pro: Inside it has a "Montblanc Ball Pen Refill" cartridge. Con: It is a twist pen.Pro: Montblanc did make twist pens, they are just (from what I understand) more seldom.*A footnote about the signature: This signature is replicated on the pen's case (see below), on the pen itself and on the back of the pen's clip. I cannot, for the life of me, make this signature out (Lehrer? Lehner? Lehre?) - Through my research, I discovered Montblanc's Signature for Good campaign - although I cannot find a website that has each year's respective campaign/signature, my search through Google and eBay yielded nothing A) similar to this pen or a name similar to the signature. I would genuinely appreciate your thoughts on this pen. Thank you in advance.
  5. I've been reading some threads on the pros and cons of the Moleskine-Fountain Pen Connection, but here I'd like a specific something: Im a huge fan of Leonard Cohen, and got a couple of limited edition Moleskines. Still drooling over them. Meantimes, I'd be grateful for any suggestions for specific pens, or inks. Im thinking a fine nib is best...? Photo at the bottom.... Alex
  6. Faber-Castell Ambition Review (Medium in Black Resin) I have owned this pen for a year now, and it has been used very heavily during that time. It was the first pen I bought and chose myself and it was a sort-of grail at the time. Th pen's design is very minimalistic. It's all straight and cylindrical. The cap is made of chrome with plastic internals, but it's very heavy. The barrel is made from brushed "precious" resin. After a year, the brushing has worn away, so it looks more polished. Still doesn't look smooth and glossy, though. The pen was breathtaking when it was new. The resin could be compared to the Lamy 2000's makrolon: Makrolon on top, resin below. Before buying the Ambition, my main concerns were the resin cracking and the comfort in the hand. There are no cracks in the pen to report, and the comfort isn't perfect, but it's fine. It's not for everyone, though. The step seen above is what concerns most. I hold the pen on the chrome section, but most hands would be too large to do so. I use the pen unposted, as posting throws the balance off a lot, due to the heavy cap. It does look very nice posted, though. The writing experience is far from perfect. The nib is very smooth, but it makes a lot of sound when writing, which makes you think it's scratchy. There is some feedback on left-to-right strokes, but it's only noticeable with pressure. Speaking of pressure, the nib is definitely a nail. Very hard with almost no line variation to be had. I would rate the flow 3/5 for wetness. The feed doesn't maintain the flow perfectly, but it's not horrible. Keep in mind the pen is only £40. Compared to other pens in this price, you get a great writer. The medium nib is quite fine, so it's suitable for everyday writing. All nib units within Faber-Castell's "Design" range are the same and compatible with other pens from the range. Overall, I enjoy the pen very much but it's not without its flaws. I would highly recommend it to anyone looking for a £40 pen that's both beautiful and a good writer. This was my first pen review. How did I do?
  7. I have recently acquired a Karas Kustoms Ink with a fine palladium nib. The pen writes great and the fine line is excellent, but it is very very wet. Since I bought this pen to use as a versatile everyday pen in the physics lab, school, for journaling and every other writing need you can imagine, I don't really have much control over the paper I will be using it on. Therefore I need to find a black ink that is both dry and adaptable. I have already tried Pelikan Brilliant Black in it, but it still bleeds through on a lot of different kinds of paper. NOW THE MOST IMPORTANT PART AND THE HEART OF THE QUESTION: I have considered using Noodler's Bulletproof Black but it seems very polarising. Lots of people praise it as their most used ink but I have also seen many say that it leaves a residue that is very hard to wash out and over the long run, ends up clogging their pens. So I want to know once and for all is Noodler's Bulletproof Black safe enough that if I use it in my pen and practice good pen hygiene (say wash it every three fill or every three weeks or something like that) will it leave any residue? If so, are there other alternatives that still fit the bill but are safer? Thank you all in advance
  8. Hi! I have recently gotten back to using fountain pens after having used them in middle school, where it was mandatory. I find some old lens lying around the house and though i could identify most of them, I have no clue about this one. Please help! Im new to FPN and this is my first post, so if there is some other thread where I should be posting this, please direct me to that. Thanks in advance.
  9. I am currently hesitating between two pens: a Karas Kustoms Ink with a fine gold Buck nib, black anodised section and tumbled raw aluminium or polished aluminium barrel or Sheaffer Targa silver or black with a gold nib also. Both are metal c/c pens and both come in the same price range (unless you look at the really expensive Targas). One is more classic, the other is more modern. One is slimmer and lighter the other is chunky and heavy without being Jinhao 159-kind of heavy. What I am looking for is a pen that I will love to carry around without fear of dropping it and destroying the finish, that will be fun to write with for extended periods of time without getting cramps (I would say I have basketball-grabbing sized hands), that will be fun to look at, even in 5 years time, and that will, obviously be rugged. To give you an idea of the size of pens I like, I really enjoy writing with my MB 146. It feels just perfect in my hand in terms of weight and size, whereas my Sheaffer Balance (500), as much as I like it, sometimes feels a bit on the small side of things. Strangely enough, considering what I just said, my Estie J feels perfectly adequate in terms of size and weight. On the opposite hand of the spectrum, my Jinhao 159 is nice but just too heavy to be fun to use for any extended period of time. Given all of this, which pen would you guys choose? What is your take on this?
  10. Full disclosure: I have no affiliation with Birmingham Pens beyond being a happy customer. Birmingham is a small Pittsburgh-based concern — apparently a one-man operation, in fact. Based on my dealings, all very positive, I would like to see the proprietor, Nick, get the support that he needs and deserves from our community to maintain and grow his business. Back when Birmingham Pens was known as “XFountainPens,” I became a fan of their custom Chesterfield line of inks, and especially the “antique” colors. In truth, I wasn't initially interested in the new Birmingham ink line when it appeared. I had, however, ordered a TWSBI 580-AL turquoise from Nick, who was offering a bottle of his ink as a promotion. Based as much on its name as anything else, I selected Fred Rogers Cardigan Red — henceforth, fRED for short — as my freebie. Unfortunately, Nick quickly ran out of inventory on the TWSBI and was obliged to cancel my order. I think it speaks to his integrity that he nonetheless sent me a full 30 ml bottle of fRED. My most recent purchase from Birmingham included two Knox Avicenna pens, one 'Slate Gray' with an oblique double-broad nib, and one 'Deep Red' with an EF nib. I prefer finer Japanese nibs, so for me the OBB was a novelty, and ordering it a caprice catalyzed by the pen's affordability — it being at the time on sale for $9.99. I first tried out Birmingham fRED with a Delta Unica and greatly enjoyed it. So once I received my Avicenna in 'Deep Red,' the temptation to pair it with fRED proved irresistible. The Avicenna belongs to a line of metal, cartridge-converter pens — all named after renowned men of learning*, and all sporting German-made Knox nibs. Avicenna is a fairly heavy pen, around 35 grams filled, of which 13.5 g resides in the cap. So, it is probably just as well that the pen does not post. Unposted, it is long enough (~125 mm) and light enough to fit most hands comfortably (size comparison photos, capped and uncapped, attached). I've not used the other Knox pen models, but they seem to differ from the Avicenna, and from each other, merely stylistically. In fact, the Plato, Aristotle, Avicenna, and Galileo have perhaps more in common than do Platonism, Aristotelianism, or any four randomly chosen schools of philosophy. Available colors do vary by model, but all the Knox pens are about the same size and weight (though the Aristotle and especially the Plato are somewhat heavier), all come with a converter and a three-year warranty, all offer the same wide choice of nibs, and all (as of this writing) regularly sell for $14.99 at Birmingham. My Avicenna seems very well constructed, with due attention given to the fit (good tolerances, a satisfying snap of the cap) and finish (a deeply rich and lustrous red). My only reservation has to do with the threads mating the metal barrel to the plastic section. This attachment feels loose as one assembles the pen, but becomes secure enough once fully tightened. The Knox steel nib (photo attached) is gold plated and etched (possibly stamped?) with attractive scrollwork and a rampant lion logo. Both the EF and the OBB nibs proved smooth, wet, skip-free, and pleasant to write with. It appears to be a #5 nib, and it is more than good enough so that no one is likely to buy this pen with the intent of swapping in a better nib. All told, the Avicenna is well worth its retail price, especially if you consider that you can get two of them, ready to write, roughly for the cost of one Lamy Safari, sans converter. “Now let's talk ink, shall we?” As nearly as I can tell, red inks fall into two categories. (For the purposes of this review, I am excluding the 'light reds,' such as carmine, rouge, magenta, and pink. I am also leaving aside particulate inks such as J. Herbin's Rouge Hematite.) On the one hand there are the 'pure reds,' which cannot be mistaken for any other color. While indubitably vivid, these inks tend to have the disadvantage of shading very little or not at all. When read back, many also assault the eyes with a near-thermonuclear intensity. In this category, I include inks such as Shaeffer Skrip Red, Diamine Wild Strawberry, Noodlers Dragon's Napalm, and De Atramentis Poppy Red. I happen on occasion to enjoy some of these inks, but let's face it: Their chief advantage is their ability to stand out, which best suits them for applications such as grading papers. A second category includes the 'hybrid reds,' of which there are too many to shake a nib at. These are predominantly red admixtures with blue, black, orange, or brown. They include shades such as burgundy, crimson, maroon, brick, terracotta, burnt sienna, oxblood, and black cherry. These inks are often very lovely, and provide decent shading, but vary widely in the redness of their identities. That's how I see it, anyway. If anyone does have experience with a 'pure red' that isn't in some measure a combination of flat, loud, and obvious, I would very much like to hear of it. Absent such a wunderkind schreibtint, if one wishes to choose a red ink for more than annotation, it seems that the practical question is not whether the chosen hue will shift away from some Platonic essence of red, but rather in what direction. Now, this is a supremely subjective matter. But to my mind, Birmingham Fred Rogers Cardigan Red manages to walk the tightrope between 'pure' and 'hybrid' red as well as any ink I have used or known. And I believe the reason is that it is such an interesting hybrid. On the one hand, I can see a slight overall leaning toward orange, though much less so than with, say, Noodler's Habanero. On the other hand, fRED is darker than most orange-reds, and shows strong traces of burgundy in more heavily inked strokes. And in its very lightest traces, there are hints of pink. While it would not be confused with Skrip or the other pure reds, fRED manages overall to retain an unambiguous red identity. To my eye, it is as unshakeably red as is — say, Diamine Matador — but within that, offers much more in the way of richness and nuance. In Fred Rogers, Birmingham has produced a red ink that is interesting, solid, versatile, and legible. Like its namesake, it is also calm and dignified, perhaps not quite to the point of being work appropriate, but at least to the point of being congenial and companionable. Indeed, whole pages written with this ink read back ..... wait for it ..... readily. (Writing sample attached.) The ink's flow was perfect in both of the pens I tried it with. And, bucking the tendency of many reds to overstay their welcome, fRED cleaned up in a jiffy with no more than water. I tend to be fickle and impatient with ink, usually itching after a few days to exhaust my pen's converter so that I can rotate in a new color from my collection. But I have to say, I was so enjoying this ink in my Delta Unica that I was genuinely sorry when it ran dry. As I later wrote to Nick, my sole complaint about Fred Rogers Cardigan Red is that it comes exclusively in 30 ml bottles. As with my other favorite ink colors — J Herbin's Lie de Thé, for example — I would hate to run out of fRED now that I have so latched onto it. I'm hoping that eventually, Nick will see fit to, as J Herbin does with Lie de Thé, offer this color in 100 ml bottles as well. [ * It is a fine thing naming a pen so as to honor erudition above political station, athletic achievement, or mere celebrity. But, though classical philosophy is not exactly replete with exemplars, one still hopes someday to see women among those so named. Not to teeter overlong on this soapbox, but if there are any penmakers within the reach of my voice, how about Marie Curie or Emmy Noether, for starters? For that matter, wouldn't it be lovely for someone to craft a pen — assuming her family's consent in the matter — Wirthy to be named after our late friend Susan? ]
  11. Hello! I was just given this pen by my mother-in-law (from France) who knows I love anything vintage. I've wanted to get a MB pen for quite some time and always admired her collection. I'd love to get new ink for this so I can actually use it, but... I don't know what model it is. I even contacted MB and was told by a rep that she didn't think it could be an MB pen because they never made one like this. (I think she must be rather new there to not realize there's a lot of pens they USED to make, but do not anymore.) So on to the details: It appears to be chrome over brass (or another non-magnetic metal, possibly just solid stainless). It has three sliding switches which once you begin to slide one down, it will release whatever tip was currently selected and locked in. To just retract the tip, you select one of the other two sliders and slide it about 1/4 of the way down, and the extended tip then springs back up into the pen body. One of the selectors is a pencil, and to extend the lead, you slide the selector all the way out and hold it, which makes it protude about 1/2" and then you can rotate the pencil tip and it pushes more lead out. Then release the slider and the pencil tip just protudes from the pen body about 1/4". At the top of the pen is the MB snowcap, as part of a thumb-screw, which can be undone by hand, this removes the triangular spring clip which has the stamping "MADE IN GERMANY". Once removed, you can see the top of the retracting springs inside the pen body. There is a small brass set screw under the spring clip, but when I removed it, the mechanicals of the pen did not seem to come out easily, so I just left it be. At the top of the body is the name "MONTBLANC". No other words or numbers can be seen. It may be that the pen units are replaced by unscrewing them, but I didn't want to try this, for fear of damaging the unit. Does anyone have any knowledge of this piece? Merci Beaucoup!
  12. Gday everyone, Long time lurker first time poster I'd like to jump straight into it and go ahead and say that I've been having problems (or should i say A problem) with my Noodlers Bulletproof black. It's an absolutely wonderful ink in pretty much every way, except one. My 'Online German: Event' Pen doesn't seem to agree with the Noodlers ink. (I have a Noodlers Flex pen inked up in Noodlers black which works perfectly fine) I've inked it up through a converter and for about, I would say the first page and a half of writing, it writes fine. It flows well with no skipping etc. However once that 1-2 page thresh-hold has been passed the problems occur: The flow becomes weaker and the nib starts to dry outMinor skipping occurs (some shaking and tapping remedies this)Flow becomes near non-existent Every second stroke skips (No amount of shaking or tapping or wetting the nib remedies this)​I've went back and talked to the boutique owner and he says that he's not surprised that an American ink, especially the 'Bulletproof' line, works poorly with a European pen. At first I thought that maybe there was a problem with the nib/feed. However after purchasing some J-Herbin and Mont-Blanc inks I'm starting to think he may be right. MY PEN WRITES PERFECTLY!! It's a very wet writer and has never skipped or been prone to dry or anything of the sort. I decided to brave the Noodlers in my Online German again, but alas, the same exact problem. I've recently read a post somewhere that the Noodlers 'Bulletproof' line is not a very well lubricated ink and is prone to flowing problems. Anyway tell me what you guys think of my situation and if you've had any similar problems with any of the Noodlers inks. ​
  13. Graf Von Faber Castell Pen of the Year 2017 (Vikings) PVD Edition The version with a tough anthracite-coloured PVD coating has a particularly masculine appeal. Matt-grey smoked oak – the preferred wood for building the Viking ships – stands in exciting contrast to the gleaming metal parts of fountain pen and roller-ball pen, which change their appearance with every movement. A grey shimmering smoky quartz adorns the cap of all writing implements of this edition. Each of these writing implements is presented in a brightly polished black wooden case. A certificate bearing the signature of Count Charles von Faber-Castell confirms that this is a limited edition The name Graf von Faber-Castell is engraved in the end piece in runes Individually numbered writing instruments Exclusive, brightly polished black wooden box with an attractive brochure and the certificate of authenticity An additional insert offers space for six more writing instruments Limited to 500 pieces (230 PVD) For inquiries email us at orders@airlineintl.com or call (915) 778-1234
  14. I got this beautiful little Gladiator ringtop - French make, embossed silver band, 18k nib, but I noticed that some of the threads are separated where the barrel and section meet. I'm proposing to introduce a small amount of Gorilla Glue into the cracks via an insulin syringe, and hold it in place with dental floss. We have a fly-tying magnifier, too...where did I get all this stuff? Any other suggestions or alternatives? I could send it out but it's just come back. She's a harsh mistress, this pen.
  15. So, I got this retractable Victorian dip pen today. It's my first dip pen. It writes nicely and I am enjoying it. I was told this was made in late 1800's or early 1900's, but I don't have any other information. I appreciate it if you could help me identify this pen
  16. A few years ago, I bought a pen very similar to these pens (almost identical to the first one, but it had one color bubble, not three): - https://www.amazon.de/Wedo-256126-Vierfarb-Kugelschreiber-Sichtwahl-Druckmechanik-auswechselbaren/dp/B002K8X43K/ref=sr_1_13?ie=UTF8&qid=1500814383&sr=8-13&keywords=vierfarbkugelschreiber - http://www.ebay.de/itm/PELIKAN-4-1-Vierfarb-Kugelschreiber-4-Color-Ballpoint-Red-Chrome-1972-VINTAGE-/272734985022?hash=item3f80459b3e:g:MPgAAOSw4CFYnE46&autorefresh=true At a flea market. I LOVED it and used it every day... until it was stolen off my desk. I have been searching for it ever since, and only recently had the bright idea of asking my family for help. They searched for it in german terms (bought it at a german flea market with german family members) and my uncle found the above results. I can't seem to purchase it on Amazon, as it says it's out of stock and the last purchase was in 2016, and I can't even find it for sale anywhere else. To me it's really special because it's not one of those slider-pens, but instead uses gravity to choose the color it sends out. I've had bad experiences with the slider type getting stuck all the time. As I am still in school, I take a LOT of notes and like to color code for clarity, and I loved having this type of pen, and really miss it. Does anyone know what it is called? Or how I could possibly find it and buy it somewhere? Or even maybe have one they're willing to sell? I am rather poor but I'd like to at least give it a try. Thank you and I hope I didn't do anything wrong! This is my first post here, though I've read posts here for a while.
  17. FordPrefect8

    Is This Even Possible !?

    Today I've found this on Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B007GU1VVE/ref=olp_product_details?_encoding=UTF8&me= It's a Pilot Heritage 92 for... less than £10 !!! This isn't real, right? Has to be a scam... In any case I ordered 4 pens I always wanted since Amazon is great with refunds. Any thoughts? should I cancel straight away and not bother?
  18. Ink View: Ivy 108 - Papier Plume’s Chicago Pen Show Exclusive! I first came to know about this and the Lake Michigan Summer a couple of weeks ago while conversing with Papier Plume on new upcoming inks. At that point the inks weer already created and I was just at the tail end of it. I was lucky enough to receive a small sample of each. As teh main batch hadn't been done yet, I got what was left from what was sent to other reviewers. Still I was happy to tryout these inks, specially since I dont have an Ink Hookup at the Chicago Show to get me some these ink bottles. Still! Many thanks to Papier Plume for providing the sample. I meant to have this out a few days back but I was tasked with painting our Condo.... and lets say it has been time consuming to say the least. I do hope you enjoy reading this (re)view as much as I enjoyed writing it. A small evident warning: This is a limited ink to 60 Bottles only available at the Chicago Pen Show. I do not know any plans for re-releasing these inks in the future, one can hope Ivy 108 the name, the ink. As noted this (ink) is one of the two exclusive inks for the Chicago pen show , and it is customary , it is inspired in some meaningful aspect of the city or the people, in this case Chicago and what is one of Chicago Passions? The Cubs. I dont claim to be baseball fan , so please bear with me as I go a little bit more into the story of this ink's name The number 108, is number that any a Cubs fan should know, as the Cubs won the World Series in 2016 after 108 years. To quote Fountain Pen Follies from his review: “As for the ivy, the Cubs play in Wrigley Field, an old gem of a ballpark known for its tiny size and its ivy-covered outfield walls.” I later learned that the ivy is called the Wrigley Field Ivy, and was planted in 1937 to make the playing field similar to the Perry Stadium (which had it until 1996). Wrigley field is the 2nd oldest in the United States and the only field that has Ivy in the outfields walls, Every other field has padding as per regulation. Today the Wrigley Field Ivy is part of the Field’s landmark designation and, when in use, ground rules apply to how to handle a ball going in and staying stuck in the ivy. So how does the ivy look? Just like this: http://i.imgur.com/Msi27zG.jpg I couldn’t find a picture of a ball stuck on the Ivy (when is green). I did found a few videos, if you have time here is a link to a recompilation Here is a shot of the bottles for the Ivy 108 ink: http://i.imgur.com/4wFd4Pr.jpg How true is the inkcolor reflecting the actual color of the Ivy? Well .. Pretty, pretty close. This as most of PP’s inks has great shading properties, is medium saturated and with good flow. As for water resistance not the strongest suit for this ink but it looks amazing on paper Let’s see the swab in the Mnemosyne card: http://i.imgur.com/qAq5A23.jpg I found out that the shading does show on medium nibs and broader. I won’t say it can’t work on fine or finer nibs for that matter, but I would recommend a wetter nib in that case. So on to the tools: Pens: Franklin Christoph – Medium Stub and Van Graf FB – Sand – Medium. Paper: Tomoe River, Rhodia, Tomoe River 68 gr, Clairefountaine Thriomphe (CF), traditional copy paper, Velum paper and Oxford Optic 90gsm paper. Tests: Flow, saturation, shading, sheen, bleed-through, see-through/show-through, feathering and pooling. With other tests such as water, bleach and alcohol and dry times. Sometimes it will be a yes/no answer, sometimes 1-5 (1 being poor, 5 being excellent) CrossOver Card As with my other reviews here is the ink behaving across all papers . - PLease note that I poured bleach and alcohol in reverse order http://i.imgur.com/7TgfIuD.jpg http://i.imgur.com/OpwcZdc.jpg You can see that each column is representative of the paper used. Thoughts on the ink-paper behavior Flow: Flow is good, consistent in most papers, some feathering in traditional copy paper I would say this is a wet ink.Saturation: Medium, it will vary on how wet your pen is, but there is not a heavy saturation sometimes it looked more saturated depending on the paper, but it was within my expectations if I was looking for good shading.Sheen: None, Zip, Nada. Even when supersaturated there is no sheen on this ink.Shade: This is where PP’s trade mark all about the shade. with the exception of copy paper,I was able to get shading across the papers used. Bleed-through: Some bleed was observed on the copy paper, under normal writing circumstances. That being said when doing the sketch I was using a really fine nib and some did bleed at that point, but I was also scratching the paper. Extreme pooling will also make this ink bleed.Show-through: There is show through with Tomoe River 52gr and clairefountaine, copy paper and Vellum. in some you wont be able to write both sides .Feathering: The ink was fairly resistant to feathering in all papers but copy paper, and thiss to a point was expected.Pooling: (This is not the shading but more on the pooling on the edges of the letters, I enjoy when the inks provide this). There was none that I could observe in any of the papersWater Resistance: The tests shown on the card were done using an eyedropper, leaving it a few seconds then using a tissue paper to retrieve the excess. with this most of the ink on all papers with the exception of copy paper was almost gone. Alcohol Resistance: Very consistent across. You would be able to recover from this one – almost no effect. (remember that I poured this one where the bleach should have gone )Bleach Resistance: None, Zip , nada. (remember that I poured this one where the alcohol should have gone )Dry Times: As noted this is a wet ink and the drying times were between the 20 and 30 second mark. Cleaning: as with PP's inks fairly easy to clean up from the pens used. Here are some other inks for comparison http://i.imgur.com/yOWt4AG.jpg From the top and then left to right: Ink Name / MakerComparison NotesKingdom Note - Sailorgold like green great shading Jade - Robert Oster an olive ink with good saturation - medium shadingVerde de Rioa lighter green than I was expecting subtly similar to jade, some sheen and medium shadingGreen Bay - Anderson PensOne of the most similar to Ivy 108. has more yellow in it and it is more muted. A very dry ink. Ivy 108 - Papier Plumen/aEmerald - Parker Penmana known ink with shading and red sheen properties more green than Ivy IG Green #3 - KWZIdarker green when dry with good shading even for an IGIG Green #4 - KWZIMore muted than #3 and with a touch more of blackStreet Car Greenanother limited of PP an ash green to better describe it And here is a quick sketch http://i.imgur.com/p2wppXy.jpg and writing samples http://i.imgur.com/SZysHNL.jpg Opinion I Like this ink. it sits on a sweet spot between of all the inks that I have, that I don't have. I always like a big story behind it and this is a nice one, but the ink itself has good things going for it, and it is safe for office use. Availability As noted at the beginning of this view this is an exclusive ink to the Chicago Pen Show and limited to 60 bottles. If you are going to the pen show, or have a friend that can pick up a bottle for you, and you are a fan of greens I strongly recommend it. Thank you again for keeping up with me up to this point ! Papier Plume notifies their ink availability through their newsletter first, then Instagram, then Facebook, and finally twitter (in that order).
  19. Pictures should be ok now Ink View: Lake Michigan Summer - Papier Plumes Chicago Pen Show Exclusive! I first came to know about this and the Ivy 108 a couple of weeks ago while conversing with Papier Plume on new upcoming inks. At that point the inks were already created and I was just at the tail end of it. I was lucky enough to receive a small sample of each. As the main batch hadn't been done yet, I got what was left from what was sent for review. Still I was happy to tryout these inks, especially since I dont have an Ink Hookup at the Chicago Show to get me some these ink bottles. Still! Many thanks to Papier Plume for providing the sample. I meant to have this out a few days back but I was tasked with painting our Condo.... and lets say it has been time consuming to say the least. I do hope you enjoy reading this (re)view as much as I enjoyed writing it. A small evident warning: This is a limited ink to 60 Bottles only available at the Chicago Pen Show. I do not know any plans for re-releasing these inks in the future, one can hope and I asked! Lake Michigan Summer (LMS) The Name and the Ink When I look at an ink I want to know if there is any story behind it, this could be a simple or could be an elaborate story, but in a way it helps me signal out an ink from many others that could be close in terms of color or properties. The Lake Michigan is the third largest of the Great Lakes (when measured by water surface) and the only Great Lake located entirely in the United States. The Lake Michigan Summer ink was meant to represent the colors of Lake Michigan in the Summer! Which when looking at the pictures you can find if the lake it does look like the ink spoilers I think it does. Here is a couple picture of the Lake Michigan in the summer http://i.imgur.com/qaYhBb1.jpghttp://i.imgur.com/D38WRN7.jpg How does the Lake Michigan gets its colors? As per some research : The blue is the color given by the light hitting the water with hues varying as the light hits sediment brought to the surface when strong winds churned the lakes.In the same way the green tint is the light hitting the algae and sea weed, reflecting the green(from the plants, which are filled with clorophile) from the waterHere is where the name meets the ink, the combination of the reflecting lights gives off a blue-green color. You can see that the LMS would probably be a teal color ink and it is. Here is the picture of the bottles http://i.imgur.com/79VVl8c.jpg Lets see the swab in the Mnemosyne card: http://i.imgur.com/WEkUXu4.jpg This ink looks consistent across different nib sizes (from EF to Stub), with main differences from one side to the other on shading and for some papers pooling. So on to the tools: Pens: Sailor Realo Medium, Franklin Christoph Blade Turk (Mark Bacas), Visconti HS Bronze Stub and Nemosyne Broad Waverly (Mark Bacas) Paper Tomoe River, Rhodia, Tomoe River 68 gr, Clairefountaine Thriomphe (CF), traditional copy paper, Velum paper and Oxford Optic 90gsm paper. Tests: Flow, saturation, shading, sheen, bleed-through, see-through/show-through, feathering and pooling. With other tests such as water, bleach and alcohol and dry times. Sometimes it will be a yes/no answer, sometimes 1-5 (1 being poor, 5 being excellent) CrossOver Card As with my other reviews here is the ink behaving across all papers . http://i.imgur.com/qL2dT6v.jpg You can see that each column is representative of the paper used. Thoughts on the ink-paper behavior · Flow: Flow is good, consistent in most papers, tiny feathering in traditional copy paper. · Saturation: Medium/Heavy, which is in part responsible for the ink color to be consistent · Sheen: there is a slight hint of sheen, it is mostly sheen when the ink is laid down heavily on paper i.e Tomoe River Both and Rhodia. · Shade: Shading is between 3 and 4 not bad shading not super shading and you can see it across most papers, vellum and copy paper excluded. · Bleed-through: I saw bleed through on copy paper and Tomoe River Both. This is a wet ink and if the paper is not well coated or thick you might find some bleed through. It was tiny tiny on the Tomoe River , but worth mentioning. · Show-through: Same as Bleed Through, This is a wet ink and if the paper is not well coated or thick you might find some show through. However in TR paper it is not enough (IMHO) to not be able to write on both sides. · Feathering: fairly good on fathering, with some on copy paper and some on Clairefountaine which incidentally I do get feathering on this paper with some inks. · Pooling: woohoo hoo you can have some pooling! TR being the best and Rhodia being the worst. No pooling on Vellum or CopyP · Water Resistance: Tests (eye dropper and smear ) show that the ink is not waterproof, and what is left id very faint making difficult to recover some of the writing if need be. · Alcohol Resistance: Very consistent across. You would be able to recover from this one almost no effect. · Bleach Resistance: None, Zip , nada. Ink was here and now is gone! Magic! · Dry Times: As noted this is a wet ink and the drying times were high with all, but copy paper, ranging from 20-30 secs. Cleaning was fairly quick and straight forward. Comparison Here are some other inks for comparison, http://i.imgur.com/NX7kmtb.jpg?1 From the top and then left to right: The biggest contendent ,in my opinion, is Diamine steel blue. Steel blue is darker and a little bit more saturated. Ink ComparisonSteel Blue - Diaminevery close to Lake MIchigan Summer - with a darker tone a a little more saturatedBlue Steel - Noodlersa lot more blue than green good shadingLake Michigan Summer- Papier Plumen/aIG. Turquoise - KWZIa good ink close to Blue steel Mentol Green - KWZIpictures does not show it but it is a good teal more close to LMS and Steel Blue than anything else Fire & Ice - Rober Osterlighter blue with red sheen And here is a quick sketch using Lake Michigan Summer http://i.imgur.com/RgeEAyR.jpg Here is some Cursive and Block writing for reference. http://i.imgur.com/hAJ6aJa.jpg Opinion I like teals and I dont have many of them, Im still waiting for Zeeblau from Akkermans Dutch Masters, which is currently in the mail. But teals are in that in between place of not being green or not being blue and for those ink lovers there is no in between for these types of colors : you either like it or you dont. I know some Ink lovers that will sit on either side of this opinion J That being said , from an objective perspective, this ink is okish for using on a work environment, I like it and I can find it to have while Im making notes. Everyday use is also not a bad thing, although I dont see this being an everywhere ink. The shading on this ink is great, whats more, the ink does pool giving that nice border effect and when concentrated and with the right paper it can even give you some hints of sheen. Someone said to me that sheen has to do with oxidization, I dont know how much of that is true, but it makes sense. After all sheen happens as the inks dries up. As always Im very grateful that I got this sample, and would be happy to have this ink as part of my collection even if it just as what is left of my sample Availability As noted at the beginning of this view this is an exclusive ink to the Chicago Pen Show and limited to 60 bottles. Which is an issue for me as I really like this ink, and I got a really small sample (only have a couple of ml left!) and Im actually going to Chicago but a month later! If you are going to the pen show, or have a friend that is picking up a bottle for you, and you are a fan of greens I strongly recommend it. Papier Plume notifies their ink availability through their newsletter first, then Instagram, then Facebook, and finally twitter (in that order). Thank you again for keeping up with me up to this point !
  20. Hi all. This is my first post so I might as well greet you pen and nib lovers in here! I am a drummer / composer / arranger and I enjoy either reading or writting music by hand, a habit that that i guess has grown out of studying scores and books that were partly or entirely written by hand. Even now, I supply the musicians with sheets that I personally write, being original score of mine or copies of clients. Quite recently I came across a video on youtube, where a famous copyist/ percussionist uses this particular pen/ nib that I immediately fell in love with. I am posting two video stills, plus the entire video link on youtube, in hope that someone might help identify this pen or suggest an alternative as close as possible to the one featured on the video. Here is the video link: Thanks for taking the time to check my post Kind regards, John A.
  21. Hello! I hope that this is the right place to post this. I'm sure some of you have heard now about the DC Pen Show's first ever Pay-It-Forward Table dedicated to giving back to the community! Krystle Azer of SquishyInk (creator of the Hippo Noto) will be at the table as well, running it with me. There will be starter kits available for new FP users, as well as items for FP veterans. So if you have any pens or pen paraphernalia that is collecting dust, we are happy to pass it along to other members of the community. The FP community is one of the very best things about the hobby, and this is just a way to further give and share in the spirit of ink. Check the link below for more details. https://www.thepenthusiast.com/dc-pen-show-pay-it-forward-table **this is not for profit and all things donated will be given free of charge or go toward the cost of the table.
  22. Tomewilkinson

    Best Pen Case?

    Hi! I'm starting to build my collection, but want to take multiple pens out with me, how ever, as I am a student, I don't want to be lugging around a large case to keep my pens safe. So what would you guys suggest, I'm after a small(ish) case, which can hold 3 pens which will protect them from becoming scratched or crushed within my bag. Hopefully something like this exists. If not, anything similar will help. And all answers appreciated. Many thanks Tom
  23. Hi guys, Somehow I am into brown-color pens these days. So far I only have Parker Vacumatic with golden brown color. I can't decide on which brown pen I should get next. Would you mind showing me the brown-color pens you have? Thank you!!
  24. Hello all! I don't really know which category this falls into, so i'll post it here. I'm looking for an ink that is dye based, relatively fade/water resistant, that does not corrode a pen if filled for an extended time (let's say 2-3 weeks) and is blue/blue-black/black (or any other color you would consider as work appropriate). Any recommendations?
  25. p{ margin:10px 0; padding:0; } table{ border-collapse:collapse; } h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6{ display:block; margin:0; padding:0; } img,a img{ border:0; height:auto; outline:none; text-decoration:none; } body,#bodyTable,#bodyCell{ height:100%; margin:0; padding:0; width:100%; } #outlook a{ padding:0; } img{ -ms-interpolation-mode:bicubic; } table{ mso-table-lspace:0pt; mso-table-rspace:0pt; } .ReadMsgBody{ width:100%; } .ExternalClass{ width:100%; } p,a,li,td,blockquote{ mso-line-height-rule:exactly; } a[href^=tel],a[href^=sms]{ color:inherit; cursor:default; text-decoration:none; } p,a,li,td,body,table,blockquote{ -ms-text-size-adjust:100%; -webkit-text-size-adjust:100%; } .ExternalClass,.ExternalClass p,.ExternalClass td,.ExternalClass div,.ExternalClass span,.ExternalClass font{ line-height:100%; } a[x-apple-data-detectors]{ color:inherit !important; text-decoration:none !important; font-size:inherit !important; font-family:inherit !important; font-weight:inherit !important; line-height:inherit !important; 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}} @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnImageGroupContent{ padding:9px !important; }} @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnCaptionLeftContentOuter .mcnTextContent,.mcnCaptionRightContentOuter .mcnTextContent{ padding-top:9px !important; }} @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnImageCardTopImageContent,.mcnCaptionBlockInner .mcnCaptionTopContent:last-child .mcnTextContent{ padding-top:18px !important; }} @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnImageCardBottomImageContent{ padding-bottom:9px !important; }} @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnImageGroupBlockInner{ padding-top:0 !important; padding-bottom:0 !important; }} @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnImageGroupBlockOuter{ padding-top:9px !important; padding-bottom:9px !important; }} @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnTextContent,.mcnBoxedTextContentColumn{ padding-right:18px !important; padding-left:18px !important; }} @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnImageCardLeftImageContent,.mcnImageCardRightImageContent{ padding-right:18px !important; padding-bottom:0 !important; padding-left:18px !important; }} @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcpreview-image-uploader{ display:none !important; width:100% !important; }} @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h1{ font-size:30px !important; line-height:125% !important; }} @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h2{ font-size:26px !important; line-height:125% !important; }} @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h3{ font-size:20px !important; line-height:150% !important; }} @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ h4{ font-size:18px !important; line-height:150% !important; }} @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .mcnBoxedTextContentContainer .mcnTextContent,.mcnBoxedTextContentContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:14px !important; line-height:150% !important; }} @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .headerContainer .mcnTextContent,.headerContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:16px !important; line-height:150% !important; }} @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .bodyContainer .mcnTextContent,.bodyContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:16px !important; line-height:150% !important; }} @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ .footerContainer .mcnTextContent,.footerContainer .mcnTextContent p{ font-size:14px !important; line-height:150% !important; }} Now accepting pre-orders Pelikan Limited Edition Raden M800 For inquiries or to place an order email us at orders@airlineintl.com Or call us at (915) 778-1234 Details Raden is a traditional Japanese decorative craft mainly used for lacquer ware and woodwork. By working with small stripes of precious shell material, the artist of the Raden pen creates a beautiful, impressive piece of art. Each piece is truly unique. The first step to create the fountain pen Raden M800 Royal Gold is to give the surface a deep black impression by using the special Japanese Urushi lacquer. Then the typical stripes are made with particles from the precious white mother of pearl shell. A 24 carat gold foil is carefully affixed to the backside of these stripes. The stripes are fixed to the cap and barrel by a coating of lacquer. Finally, the artist individually signs and numbers each fountain pen with the Maki-e technique, which used to be reserved exclusively for Japanese Royals as an indication of their power. With the limited edition Raden series, Pelikan applies this wonderful Japanese decorative craft to fountain pen models of its famous Souveraen series. The Raden M800 Royal Gold fountain pens are masterpieces with finely-chased 18 carat gold nib in the size M, accentuated with a rhodium decor. Each fountain pen is encased in a traditional Japanese gift box which is made of Paulownia wood. The Raden M800 Royal Gold will be available mid-June 2017 in a limited edition of 388 pieces worldwide. MSRP:$3,000.00 Copyright © *2017* *Airline International Luggage*, All rights reserved. @media only screen and (max-width: 480px){ table#canspamBar td{font-size:14px !important;} table#canspamBar td a{display:block !important; margin-top:10px !important;} }





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