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  1. I haven’t heard many people talk about this, so I just wanted to make those who are unaware now aware. Here is just a quick thing on some price comparisons. “Retail” price was taken from online fountain pen and ink retailers: DIAMINE 30ml Cult Pens- $2.47 Retail- $7.50 PELIKAN 4001 30ml Cult Pens- $4.82 Retail- $11.75 ROHRER & KLINGNER 50ml Cult Pens- $5 Retail- $11.95 PARKER QUINK 57ml Cult Pens- $5.21 Retail- $11.02 DIAMINE 80ml Cult Pens- $6.21 Retail- $14.95 WATERMAN 50ml Cult Pens- $6.51 Retail- $12 PELIKAN 4001 62.5ml Cult Pens- $7.52 Retail- $16.50 DIAMINE 150th ANNIVERSARY 40ml Cult Pens- $8.15 Retail- $15.50 HERBIN 30ml Cult Pens- $8.40 Retail- $12.95 KAWECO 50ml Cult Pens- $8.41 Retail- $12 CROSS 62.5ml Cult Pens- $9.47 Retail- $16 LAMY CRYSTAL 30ml Cult Pens- $9.99 Retail- $16 JACQUES HERBIN 1670 50ml Cult Pens- $18.39 Retail- $29.50 JACQUES HERBIN 1798 50ml Cult Pens- $21.02 Retail- $29.50 MONTBLANC AROUND THE WORLD IN 80 DAYS BLUE 50ml Cult Pens- $33.66 Retail- $40 I just wanted to tell all of you who weren’t aware. Have a nice day, W. Major
  2. Three 'taupe' (grey brown) fountain pen inks, two French, one German: J. Herbin La Perle des Encres Cacao du Bresil L'Artisan Pastellier Classique Brun Ours Rohrer & Klingner Schreibtinte Sepia These three colors are very close. Two of them are nearly indistinguishable, at least to me, but there are differences. I'm tentatively planning a combined review of these three similarly-colored inks but, in the meantime, here's a teaser quiz: three writing samples with my normal, quick note-taking hand, all using the same type of pen - 3 different Pilot 78Gs with 'B' nibs, a dry pen with a fairly crisp italic nib that I enjoy a lot - Rhodia paper from a pad, and each writing sample uses a different one of the above three inks. The photos were taken in the same light at nearly the same time (late afternoon indirect sun). The goal of this quiz is to match the ink - Cacao du Bresil, Brun Ours, & Sepia - used with each writing sample: A, B, & C. After you have had a few days to take a guess I will try to post chromatography photos. And your impressions of the inks are welcome and encouraged, of course!
  3. Hello, I was just wondering if it’s just me or do you guys have a specific pen for a specific notebook? This ink color for this pen color only? I use my pilot kakunos (M,F,EF) with colors black, gris nuage, diamine grey, respectively, for my midori notebook journal. My kawecosport (BB) in the shade earl grey for midori everyday journal. 2 Kawecosport (EF) using Vinta in the shade perya and ubi for midori and rhodia notes. Kaweco perkeo (M) using smokey grey for random scribbles and midori travel journal. Am I the only one? Lol
  4. I have always loved and used Herbin Rouille D'Ancre, which, for all its quirks (listed elsewhere) I find to be a unique "Gentleman's Pink". . . . . until I discovered a near doppelganger which, ulp, might be an improvement on the original (although similarly loathed by reviewers on here!). . . . . and then yesterday a third, although this one tends a bit more "rust" . . . . which might also make it the salmon/coral that I have been searching for but not yet found? Still in the heady days of first love here, so I'll report back with clearer spectacles as the roses fall off, but here's a first sample: Another arrangement: I didn't label them as a kind of a quiz! One is the French original, one is from Japan (ergo costly as a US import), and one is from Germany - but which is which? (I'd be happy to tell, if anyone is interested!)
  5. From the Jacques Herbin site: "To celebrate the 350th anniversary of Jacques Herbin’s original brand, we are letting the people who know us best, our fans, choose the new colour of our next anniversary ink. This will form part of the official Jacques Herbin collection. Our ink experts have designed four very distinct shades. The range varies from pastel to dark, soft to flamboyant and tender to lively, each with shimmering and radiant reflections. Each one unique. And to mark this vintage in an even more spectacular way, we decided to create a unique Jacques Herbin ink with both silver and gold glitter that will add sparkle to your writing! So what do you need to do? You have until 16th March to vote and let us know your favourite below. The result will then be verified, and we will reveal the results by email in early April. As if you needed more of a reason to vote, the Jacques Herbin team will then randomly select FIVE voters to exclusively preview the new ink in the luxury of their own home. The winning ink will be available from selected stationery retailers, ink specialists and boutiques for purchase from September 2020." https://www.jacquesherbin.com/en/new-anniversary-ink-survey.html
  6. Eclipse157

    4 Pink Purples

    KWZ Brown Pink Diamine Merlot Herbin Poussiere del Lune Diamine Tyrian Purple The KWZ, like many others from Konrad, looks almost black when pooled, with a velvety, matt sheen. It is the most free-flowing of the bunch. The Diamines have a very slight golden sheen, more evident on Tomoe than on this Rhodia; Tyrian Purple is the least saturated of the bunch and exhibits a more pronounced halo effect when used with the flat nib. Poussiere de Lune is more blue than the others. If I had to pick a favourite, it'd be Tyrian Purple
  7. LightYagami

    J Herbin Pronunciation

    As someone who has properly studied French, I cringe every single time when people pronounce the French brand J Herbin as 'Shay Herbaaaaaan.' Even S Brown, who seems particulate in the spelling of foreign words, makes this mistake, though I forgive him for that since his doctorate is not anything about language. Please, guys. Stop. I don't know why but if someone pronounces a German word wrong, someone else will correct him immediately, but that's never the case for French. The correct pronunciation is more like 'Shī Airbang.' So J in French is not Shay but sounds more like G; the 'her' in Herbin is pronounced without the 'H' sound; and the 'n' at the end is not pronounced. I'd like to encourage you to watch this short clip. The pronunciation here is on point. https://youtu.be/1DAaJa77ju0 Otherwise, just simply say Jay Her-bin. It's still much better sounding.
  8. Scented Inks — Encre Parfumée
  9. Eclipse157

    4 Brown Yellows

    In the end I won't be getting the Honey, it doesn't seem to be different enough to me.
  10. I was given some Poussière de Lune for Christmas, which was lovely. But I would prefer it to be a touch redder. I've tried blending it with Sheaffer Skrip Red, and that works, but even at 3 Poussière to 1 Skrip, it's a bit too red. Has anyone played around with something like this? I'm surprised relatively little of the Skrip makes so much difference. The perfect mix for me is probably around 5 or 6 to 1, but before I work on it further, I thought I would ask for some advice...
  11. Eclipse157

    4 Blues.

    Hey guys! I was pondering whether or not to order a full bottle of KWZ Azure #1 and I made this to help me decide. It didn't look extremely ugly so I decided to share, maybe it can be useful or something
  12. Sometimes I get an ink and it exceeds all of my expectations. Everything clicks, and I love it immediately. That happened with J. Herbin's Vert de Gris. It was the last of 5 Herbin inks from my recent order that I opened and tested, as I thought "well, it's just a tealy gray, how special can it be?" I was wrong--it's very special! Vert de Gris, along with Bleu des Profoundeurs, are exceptional recent additions to the standard line-up of J. Herbin inks. Most here are probably well-familiar with J. Herbin inks in one form or another--the brand has been around for a very long time and offers inks in all colors of the rainbow, even with shimmer. The standard line of J. Herbin inks has been known as safe and gentle to fountain pens, even vintage. Saturation tends to be lower (thus easy flushing), and the formulations are advertised to be pH-neutral, though whether all the colors are close to pH-neutral has been contested by some. In any event, I've never had any problems with J. Herbin inks from their standard non-shimmer line, and since I own a bunch of vintage pens, I tend to go for more gentle inks. But gentle does not need to be boring! In fact, this ink is anything but boring. The interesting thing about it is how beautifully rich and matte it looks in high quantity (such as with a flex nib), and its beautiful hue in person. It looks especially good on ivory paper. Water resistance is very respectable--the tealy-blue components wash off leaving highly legible dark gray line, and water does not reduce writing to a smeary mess. If I'm going to fault this ink in one thing, it's that on worse paper it's more feathering prone than some other inks. No problems with feathering on good fountain pen-friendly paper.
  13. "HERE IT IS: The Kyanite du Népal from our exclusive 1798 Anniversary Ink Collection available 06/21 [21st June] About the ink: Kyanite is bright blue and pulling toward turquoise. It is magnified thanks to a cloud of silver glitter for a powerful and elegant writing. Since the discovery of the famous mining region of Nepal, Kali Gandaki, Kyanite has been recognized as a noble mineral because of its similarities with the rich tones of sapphire." https://www.instagram.com/p/BxPo8LxDyiC/ And see here https://www.reddit.com/r/fountainpens/comments/bmajwk/this_years_j_herbin_1798_ink_kyanite_du_n%C3%A9pal/
  14. I'm new to this ink, but it was exciting enough that I decided to write a mini review for it. Sorry for my crooked writing--I've been practicing a proper grip, which makes me write in chickenscratch J. Herbin - Rouille D'Ancre is an interesting ink. It's pink? No it's coral. No it's peachy faded red? Wait, let me turn on the table lamp, it looks different again... Yes, it's difficult to categorize. I honestly thought I would be getting a cross between true rose gold and Apple kind of anodized aluminum rose gold, but it's neither. It's always legible and not pale, unless you have a super dry writer. The color makes me happy for some reason, and I want to keep writing with this ink. I personally think it looks best with a pen that gives you some line and flow variation, like a stub nib, a vintage pen, or some kind of flexy nib. In my case, I decided to use it with a great FPR Himalaya that is equipped with an ebonite feed and "ultra flex" steel nib. Drying time is really good. Unless you're leaving globs of ink left and right, it dries very quickly. 10-15 seconds. The appearance on the page is matte. If you use a wet writer, there is some dark edging / outlining effect. The ink has some greenish-cyan components and more yellow-brown components, as can be seen on the paper towel droplet spread and water brush tests. I think the outlining effect is also enhanced due to this turquoise component. No feathering observed on typical fountain-pen-friendly paper, though my newly obtained HP Premium Choice 32lb 100-brightness paper did feather with this ink and J. Herbin Vert Empire. I've tried my best to represent my ink properly, though due to the readily color-shifting property of it, that was was not an easy task. Next to PenBBS "Rose Quartz" ink: (PenBBS Rose Quartz on the top right): Scan (not accurate for Rose Quartz--the photograph above is accurate):
  15. I love dark purple ink. Currently I have my Pilot Custom 823 inked up with Poussière de Lune but I almost run out. Im looking into Montblanc Lavender Purple now. I wonder whats the difference? Herbin Poussière de Lune is great for me. Since its dark enough but still have some shade. It is quite nice to take academic notes with. I have the following questions: 1. Is Montblanc darker or lighter? 2. How does the inkflow compare? 3. Saturation? 4. Any side by side comparison? 5. Anything else you would like to elaborate on. Thank you all!
  16. Since succumbing to the Hobonichi Cousin last year, I have been enjoying matching my fountain pen ink colour to that of the daily pages. The Japanese versions of this planner has lovely, slightly dusty, faded vintage colours which change for each month. The whole page is printed in that colour - grid, Japanese quote, date and day markets etc. So I thought it would be fun to write using a matching ink - a great excuse for exploring some of the glorious colours now available and a built in excuse for changing inks regularly. This idea was inspired by a blog I saw (sorry, can't remember who) where the writer had done a similar project but using gel pens. I know everyone's experiences of ink colour is different, depending on pen, nib, paper, how heavy-handed your are, phase of the moon (who knows? Maybe) but I thought someone out there may be doing something similar and we could share our thoughts. Anyway, here are my selections so far: January: burnt orange - Monteverde Fire Opal February: bronze brown - my own mix using Platinum mixable inks March: pinky purple - Herbin Larmes de Cassis April: red pink - Colorverse Sea Europa May: bright olive - KWZ green Gold Ii or Monami Olive June: grey green - another custom mix - see above July: grey turquoise - Birmingham Pen Co Fountain Turquoise August: blue grey - another custom mix - see above September: warm brown - Krishna Vaikhari October: grey purple - another custom mix - see above November: pine green - Birmingham Pen Co Fern Hollow Creek December: faded red - another custom mix - see above. As you can see, I've ended up mixing some colours myself - lots of fun, and I'm less happy with some of the other choices so will need to explore further. For example, I find the Herbin colours a bit watery but haven't yet found a similar colour to Larmes de Cassis; the Krishna Vaikhari is a nice colour but not quite yellow enough... I generally stick to relatively easily available inks and would like to expand the brands but I like this selection as a first pass. I should add that I'm using a Pilot Metro with a Plumix EF or F calligraphy nib. If anyone else is doing this, I'd love to see your choices or generally, any thoughts.
  17. If you need a bit of encouragement! Available at up to a 30% discount. https://www.jacquesherbin.com/en/ The only association I have with J Herbin is the Bleu Austral on my shelf.
  18. essayfaire

    Japan Haul

    Look at all the lovely goodies my daughter brought me from Japan! I think the Herbin is the only exclusive, and the Pilot isn't the Capless in a non-exported color that I was hoping for, but it is engraved. I know the inks are more widely available now than the used to be, but I love that they were hand-delivered from the country that inspired them. It's also the first time I've been able to get my hands on proprietary cartridges that aren't black.
  19. Some of you like to match specific inks to specific pens. And I do that myself, sometimes. But do any of you try to match specific inks to specific papers? I really love Kaweco Paradise Blue but recently discovered that the strokes of ink form a weird greasy-looking halo, plus bleed-through, apparently only on cream-colored Rhodia paper after several months. I checked back in my Leuchtturm 1917 notebook where I had used the ink about a year or two ago with no such problems showing up (just a tiny bit of bleed-through). And some inks look dulled on off-white paper, while others look richer. Right now I am trying to find a good A5 notebook match for J. Herbin Cacao Du Brésil, my all time favorite ink. I was using it in my Bullet Journals but the color visually made the dot grid on my journal pages look extremely prominent, causing each page to look like a crazy Svengali hypnotic pattern (i.e. hard to read)! I’ve been trying lighter dot-grids than what is in the Rhodia “goalbook,” but I may have to move to a lined or blank journal if I want to use my favorite ink. What inks and papers do you like to use together?
  20. Some Birmingham Pen Co and Herbin inks. The bottom row is the April 2018 Pen Parcel 5-ink set: South Side Market Boysenberry, Enterprise Tower Aluminum, Mary Lou Williams Piano Girl Pink, George Ferris Jr. Fair Wheel Blue, and Allegheny Courthouse Justice Blue. The top rows are March's set plus some others for comparison. The Herbins are just colors I wanted to try and finally bought 10mL bottles of, plus some comparison colors from 30mL ones I already had. Halogen: Daylight:
  21. Hello dear members of FPN, I would like to know whether there are any ways to identify when the particular bottle of J Herbin has been manufactured. Also is there a shelf life to their inks (non-shimmer one, I am looking at Poussiere De Lune with interest). This is assuming that the ink itself was not sun-bathing on a window display or the bottle otherwise tampered with. I am also looking at PR Ebony Purple, but am wary of catching a bad sample, now that their inks are manufactured after the passing of the original owner (who presumably knew the secret sauce to make these colors tick). Read enough to know that I may also get one sample with slime/sludge/mold etc. Thanks in anticipation,
  22. I've just photographed a bunch of Col-O-Ring cards with darker blue-green inks, while comparing them to a custom-mixed ink discussed in Inky Recipes: https://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/topic/334121-masques-mix-black-swan-in-icelandic/ I thought I'd share the photographs here, in case they will be helpful for anyone. Since display calibration and general accuracy of representation varies, the main value of these is comparative between the shades. Though I did try to make the colors appear as I see them in person (at least on my devices). I think Fire& Ice should be slightly more saturated and a tad more green. Turquoise and Eau de Nil should be a bit less saturated, more matte. Diamine Asa Blue is a slightly turquoise medium blue. Birmingham Pen Co. Fountain Turquoise is a pale greenish turquoise. Lamy Petrol is similar to Noodler's Aircorp Blue Black in regular writing: both are quite green blue-blacks. ACBB has no sheen, Petrol has unique rose gold sheen. Sailor's Yama Dori was a disappointment to me: it's a dark teal-black that's got a kind of matte washed out appearance. Granted it does sheen easily, but I just didn't care for the lackluster base color. Robert Oster Fire & Ice: ranges from dark blue-teal to very vivid glowing turquoise, depending on the pen used (dry or wet). Sheen is pretty minimal unless you let the ink concentrate sitting in a pen for a few days. Diamine Eau de Nil: nice muted blue-teal, darker, not too vivid Robert Oster Tranquility: this is a green-teal Robert Oster Aqua: more green than Fire & Ice J. Herbin Emerald of Chivor: similar to Aqua in base color. Sheen and shimmer can be hit or miss, depending on paper and concentration Organics Studio Walden Pond "Blue" : definitely a misnomer, there is almost nothing blue about it. It's strongly green, though on the bluer green side. Sheens a vivid metallic magenta so easily, it can take over the whole writing. If you use a dip pen with it and low absorbent paper like Clairefontaine or greeting cards, the metallic sheen completely covers up the green-black, and the letters look like you wrote them with a metallic magenta ink.
  23. Ink Shoot-Out : Pelikan Edelstein Smoky Quartz vs J. Herbin Lie de Thé Last year, Pelikan pleasantly surprised me with its Ink of the Year 2017 - Smoky Quartz, and I've been really enjoying this smoky brown liquid. Fellow member Jan2016 then suggested that J. Herbin Lie de Thé is a very similar ink. That of course peaked my interest... so I got me a bottle of Lie de Thé and decided to pitch both inks against each other. Time to do a detailed comparison, and find out which of these is the better ink. Enter... the Ink Shoot-Out. A brutal fight spanning five rounds, where truly formidable inks do battle to determine who is the winner. And this time it's really a battle of giants! In the left corner - the new star from Hanover and Prussian heavyweight : Pelikan Edelstein Smoky Quartz. In the right corner, the crown jewel of Paris and offspring from a long line of giants : J. Herbin Lie de Thé. The boxing hall is packed to the roof, the crowds are cheering! Let the fight begin and may the best ink win... Round 1 First Impressions These are indeed heavyweights with a firm impression on the paper. Both inks leave a well-saturated line with excellent contrast to the page when used with my Lamy Safari M-nib on Rhodia N°16 notepad paper. Both inks also show subtle shading, without too much contrast between the light and darker parts, which I find aesthetically pleasing. The inks look quite similar, but there are some differences: Lie de Thé is a lighter brown, with more yellow undertones. This also shows in the chromatography of the inks. This lighter nature of Lie de Thé is most obvious in swatches, less so in written text.Lie de Thé lays down a wetter line. Smoky Quartz in contrast is a drier ink, but a really well lubricated one. With broader nibs, e.g. with the scribbles made with a 1.5 mm calligraphy nib, Smoky Quartz shows a bit more character, with a more pleasing appearance.Both inks make a great first impression. But when they climbed into the ring, the German champion radiated more confidence. I prefer its slightly darker hue, and the fact that it shows more character with the calligraphy nib. These inks are well matched, but for this round Smoky Quartz gets a small advantage from the judge. The chromatography clearly shows that both inks have lots in common. They have a really similar composition, with only a touch more yellow in the French ink's mix of dyes. Round 2 Writing Sample The writing sample was done on Rhodia N°16 Notepad with 80 gsm paper. Both inks behaved flawlessly, with no feathering and no show-through or bleed-through. With the EF nib, the darker complexion of Smoky Quartz comes into play, resulting in more contrast-rich writing. I also noticed that Smoky Quartz leaves a crisper line on the page, especially when using broader nibs. My guess is that this is due to the really pronounced initial wetness of Lie de Thé, which results in a slightly less well-defined line. Colourwise both inks look similar in writing, although there is definitely more of a yellow undertone in the J. Herbin ink. Both inks also shade nicely, without too much contrast between light and dark parts. This aesthetically pleasing shading gives more character to your writing. For this round, the focus is on writing, and here Smoky Quartz got a slight advantage. It works better with EF nibs, and also shows a crisper line. Not much of an advantage, but enough to result in a win on points. Round 3 Pen on Paper This round allows the batlling inks to show how they behave on a range of fine writing papers. From top to bottom, we have : FantasticPaper, Life Noble, Tomoe River and Original Crown Mill cotton paper. All scribbling and writing was done with a Lamy Safari M-nib. Both champions did well, with no show-through nor bleed-through. But this round is not about technicalities, it is about aesthetics and beauty. Are the fighters able to make the paper shine ? One thing is immediately apparent: these inks are at home on a wide range of papers, both white and off-white ones. On more absorbent paper like Fantasticpaper (top), the inks look really similar. With Tomoe River - definitely a non-absorbent paper - Lie de Thé shows its lighter nature. But it also lays down a less crisp line, making it look less interesting and losing some of its beauty. Both inks are on par with each other, but Smoky Quartz has a slight advantage in the looks department - it shows a more consistent look across the range of papers. For this round, victory is granted to Smoky Quartz. Not a knock-out, but definitely a win on points. Round 4 Ink Properties These inks are not fast-drying, requiring 20-25 seconds to dry completely (with an M-nib on Rhodia paper). Lie de Thé takes a bit more time to dry. Both inks are reasonably smudge-resistant. Some colour rubs off when using a moist Q-tip cotton swab, but the text itself remains crisp and clear. Being the lighter ink, the smudging is less pronounced with Lie de Thé. To test water resistance, I dripped water on the grid and let it sit there for 15 minutes, after which I removed the water with a paper towel. Both inks are remarkably water-resistant! The brown colour disappears, but a clearly readable dark-grey residue remains even after a 15 minute soak. Really impressive. For this round, both champions were well-matched, but Lie de Thé gets a small advantage for its less pronounced smudging. Round 5 The Fun Factor Welcome to the final round. Here I give you a purely personal impression of both inks, where I judge which of them I like most when doing some fun stuff like doodling and drawing. Both inks do well, and allow for some nice effects when using a water brush. I really enjoyed using them. With both inks, you can coax a broad colour range out of them. Dilute them with water, and you get the yellowish hues used for the background. Really saturate them, and you get a very similar looking dark brown. The foliage in the picture shows the undiluted colour, where Lie de Thé is obviously the lighter coloured ink. But overall, both champions did equally well, and no clear winner emerges. So for this round, I call it a draw - I greatly enjoyed playing with both of them. The Verdict Both inks are real jewels, that work on all types of paper. And being water-resistant, they make fine inks for use at work in an EDC pen. Is there a clear and definite winner? No. But the German champion did show a bit more promise : better contrast with EF nibs, and overall a crisper line on non-absorbent paper. Small advantages, but enough for this judge to declare Pelikan Edelstein Smoky Quartz the winner of this fight.





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