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  1. If you're into fountain pens, chances are you know who Kanwrite is. They're the largest nib manufacturer in India and their models like the desire and heritage have garnered critical acclaim all over the world. They also (allegedly) make some of Noodler's pens as well. But that's not all the models they make. They make some pretty good inexpensive pens as well... some of which are a good choice for students and beginners who would like to start their fountain pen journey. Today I'm going to look at Kanwrite's cheapest offering, the Apex. A simple eyedropper pen that can be found at about ₹60 - 100/- INR(less than $1-2 USD) in India. And for the TL;DR of it, it's a pen that, if you want a good beginner pen or you want to venture into the world of eyedropper pens, this is a good place to start. So, let's crack on... Design and Build This is the cheapest pen that Kanwrite offers, and you can tell... not necessarily on the build quality, but you can tell why they chose to go with an eyedropper for this, you're basically paying for the nib, feed and a plastic housing. But beauty lies in simplicity... right? For the minimal amount of materials used the pen looks and feels solid. Even though it's at the bottom of the barrel compared to other Kanwrites, ink it up and it has the same amount of character and appeal as other fountain pens. They have various tints for the plastic, but I went for the demonstrator look because, well... I'm a sucker for those. The pen is made of the same plastic that is called a "celluloid derivative" by Mr.Nathan Tardif himself, and yes... it has the smell, but not that much compared to other pens that I have that's made of the same material(lookin' at you... Kanwrite PC converter). and yes... it can handle drops like a ballpoint... I accidentally dropped it back side down about 3ft from the ground, and aside from a temporary ink fountain that covered my floor with purple ink, the pen wrote as soon as I picked it up and put It on paper(probably because the fall helped prime the feed even more). The cap is a simple screw in cap that takes around 2 turns to open/close. and the clip is sufficiently tight yet easy to clip into even thick fabrics. it also has Kanwrite stamped on it, alongside the heat embossed Kanwrite logo in the barrel. Overall for a ₹60/- pen, it looks distinctive, and that's good in my books. The only issue is that the pen has minor flashing marks on the inside of the section, probably due to not properly trimming the injection molded parts, but other than that, a solid pen that is well built. As for size, well... it's a small pen... From left to right: Kanwrite Relik Jinhao X450 Airmail/Wality 71JB(cartridge converter system) Kanwrite Desire Kanwrite Apex Nib, Feed and Writing Experience Kanwrite is a company Known for their nibs, so it shouldn't be a surprise that this one will also be a good nib, right? Well, we'll get to that in a bit. Let's first take a look at the nib, shall we? The nib is a Kanwrite No.00 stell nib in fine. The same nib that is used in the Relik and perhaps even the same size as in the Airmail 77 and Camlin 47. It's a tiny fella, and couple that with an ebonite feed that is sufficiently finned, and you can rest assure that reliability will be a strong suit of this pen... and it is. I have never run into any dry out issues even when left uncapped for the better part of an hour. So suffice to say, it's a reliable writer. Talking about how it feels while writing, well, the pen is a small guy. But even for me, a guy with a hand the shape of a kayak(slim and long...) writing it unposted was fine, but I'd still recommend posting it as then it's in my opinion a perfect size for writing with. Talking about writing, and well... It writes just like a Kanwrite. Very smooth for the most part with a hint of a feedback. It's less than you get while writing with a pencil but you feel that you are writing. This is with TNPL 70gsm copier paper though. Move on to a better paper like a Classmate or Rhodia, and the nib just glides... honestly, as much as the Airmail 69T that I shoehorned a Kanwrite No.35 nib into(Check that one out here). And I'm baffled that you can get this writing experience out of a pen that costs around the same as a ghee roast in a restaurant. Now the pen is an eyedropper and does take around 2ml of ink. And like most eyedroppers it does burp, but when the barrel is so low that you are not refilling the pen out of pure ignorance and laziness. So, refill it when the ink gets to about 1/8th mark, which'll last you more than 2-3 ballpoints. Plus, everything is friction fit, so it is easy to clean. Before getting into the conclusion here's a writing sample of this pen. Conclusion and Final verdict Honestly, there isn't much to say about it, if you have a Kanwrite PC, Saloon, Relik or any of the lower end ones, the experience is somewhat similar. and for just 60 rupees, you can't go wrong. Like I said in the beginning it's a pen that, if you want a good beginner pen or you want to venture into the world of eyedropper pens, this is a good place to start. It is a cheap and effective gateway drug into the world of fountain pen. couple this with a ₹25/- bottle of bril blue, and you're pretty much set for at least half a year, or more. Thanks for reading my write up and I'll see you around...
  2. I was perusing through the fountainpen forums the other day and came across @mehandiratta's review of the Airmail 71JT. He described how the pen was magnificent, but the nib it came with was a mess... literally, as it burped on first write... and he then swapped with a No.35(International #6 for anyone wondering) nib and now it's his daily writer. I was so astonished by the fact that you can swap a no.35 nib on an airmail pen which usually takes No.8(a stubbier version of a #6) nib. So being the curious and idiotic imbecile that I was, I started to find out how to fit a No.35 nib to my pen... Forgetting the fact that my pen is the smaller 69T instead of the 71JT(Which literally means Jumbo Transparent) that I bought from The Pen Hospital in my city (Thrissur) a while ago. At first I was surprised that the nib didn't fit as the diameter for No.8 and No.35 feed was identical... while I found a way to coax it in there, the cap wouldn't close properly... after about two days I got frustrated and abandoned the idea and planned to buy a 71JT... but then... While I was watching youtube, a channel called Penatomy appeared in my feed and I saw that he was able to fit a Kanwrite No.35 nib in an Airmail 69T... and I got my guts back... And I watched the video and found out that evenly scraping off the ebonite feed bit by bit until the nib fits in place... and voila... a No.35 nib on a 69T... And I have so much to say about it... Design And Build To be frank... this is one of the most beautiful budget pens I have (given that my pen collection only contains pens under ₹800/- at least for now). And it's the blend of a simple clear acrylic barrel that is hand turned with the randomness of the pattern of the plastic cap (that is made of the vegetal resin and it smells... but not as strongly as the converter in the Kanwrite PC was check that one here.), the chromed finish of the cap band and the simple clip to the clear crystal like portion on the back end... all come together to make a timeless and handsome looking fella... The build is also... for the price... reasonable. Yes you won't get the heft and the metallic build of a Jinhao... but this is an eyedropper pen and if it were made of metal... then it would have not been an airmail/wality wouldn't it (at least in my opinion). The pen is long enough to hold comfortably unposted and it's light enough to write without any fatigue for a long time... Posting it though... unless you have gorilla sized hands... don't use it posted... I have a very thin and long hands (like a canoe oar... if you will) and for me unposted is the way to go... and you might find the backweight a little too much when posted... The only sort of complaint that I have in regards to the looks is that for a pen with chrome trims, it comes with a sorta gold, sorta bronze type of plated steel nib (the nib shown above), and I'd rather have it a un-plated steel nib... thankfully the Kanwrite nib fixes that for me...(the picture shown below is of a Kanwrite No.8 swap that I did before I ventured into a No.35 swap)... As for size comparison here it is next to: Kanwrite Desire Hero 336 Pilot Hi-Techpoint V7(That I eyedropper converted) Nib, Inking And Writing As I mentioned, the standard 69T comes with a No.8 Steel Airmail nib... And I might have been one of the lucky ones from what I hear about Wality nibs because at first it was a bit on the toothy side, but a little polishing fixed that... to some extent... it had a bit of scratchiness in the leftward strokes and I wasn't experienced enough at the time to remedy it, so I bought a No.8 kanwrite nib and wrote with that for a short time... and it worked. Well... Kind of... You see... Since it is an eyedropper, I was expecting some burping... but not when the ink is 7/8th of the barrel... and that issue pertained with both No.8 nibs... I then read about heat setting the ebonite feed... and that worked to an extent... but still about half full before the pen starts to burp is a bit too early in my opinion... So as per the intro, I started to try and fit the No.35 nib into the 69T. And suffice to say that I shoehorned it in there is an understatement It took a lot of trial and error but after bit by bit sanding off the feed, I was able to fit the nib deep enough that the cap can open/close in 2 turns... which was enough for me and that is how much the cap turned to open/close initially. But was all that trouble worth it? In short... Yes... The nib I fitted was a Kanwrite No.35 Fine nib in a steel finish... and I think it suits the pen better than the No.8 nibs that Airmail uses. that extra flare in the shoulder and the increased length really sets the proportions right for me... And when we come to the writing... Fine and smooth with a hint of feedback... Just the way I like it because it allows me to write fast enough without being too fast that my hand gets out of control... so I prefer pens with a slight feedback. But the feedback isn't intrusive and the pen just glides along the page. And remember, the amount of feedback depends on the paper used as well. On standard 70gsm copier paper like the one used in the writing test, the writing feels more pencil like. But if used in a higher quality paper like a Classmate or Rhodia, the feedback becomes, near as makes no difference, unnoticeable and the nib just glides over the page while putting on a generous, wet, fine line. The line is fine by western standards and a medium when compared to nibs like that from Pilot. But suffice to say that this is an upgrade that you should do. and with proper heat setting of the feed, there is absolutely no burping until the ink gets critically low, and by that time I would've refilled it anyway... All of these combined made my Airmail from never carry to daily carry. And for me, that's a win. Conclusion To conclude this for about ₹400-450/- for the pen and about ₹75/- for the nib which overall costs around ₹500-530/-(around $8 USD) this is a pen that punches way above it's weight and is a recommend from me... if you are not feeling that adventurous then a No.8 nib swap from Kanwrite can make you love your airmail even more... Trust me, if you have a Airmail/Wality 69/71 series,and you want to have an enhanced writing experience (and you're a bit frugal like me), don't buy another pen... just swap the nib with a better one. Your love for that pen will be enhanced... Just like my love for my 69T
  3. I'll just get right to it, starting with the hard facts: The Acriv Ebowrite Master is an oversized ebonite eyedropper with a crimped titanium nib. It measures 167mm capped, and 149mm uncapped. It posts, but... 149mm uncapped. Here it is next to a Lamy Al-Star: Brimful with ink it weighs 33gm. I paid $40 for the pen, it shipped for free, and was delivered to the US in about 5 weeks from the day I placed the order. It came with a genuine leather, zipper case, that struggles to contain the pen. I'm not a fan of zippered cases, but this one is actually rather nice and well made. Just a bit too small. The pen itself, is also well made. It's straight, no unevenness in the profile and the cap screws on straight. It has a matte, almost stealth-like, brushed finish. The matte effect is mostly due to very fine ebonite dust, however. After rubbing it clean with a paper towel and a dab of No-Oxi-Oil, it looks more like fine wood grain. Not glossy, but not stealthy either. I find it looks better, now. Lamy 2000-like. The section, like the rest of the pen, is made of ebonite. I'm a bit disappointed that it has a smooth finish. I also wish it had a slightly concave profile, rather than the straight taper. The cap takes 1 1/4 turns to unscrew, the barrel requires 8 turns. Both screw on tight. After several weeks of use I have yet to experience dry-outs or leaks. The barrel interior was full of ebonite dust and flakes, and required a thorough cleaning. I used No-Oxi-Oil and paper towels, and followed up with a thin coat of silicone grease. Pay attention to all threads as they tend to trap ebonite dust. The pen works only as an eyedropper. I did not try to measure ink capacity, but I'd say it's 4ml or more. The pen does have some other minor quality issues. The etching on the clip is not dead center, and the section lip has a rough edge. Also, after cleaning the exterior some flaws in the ebonite became visible; one orange spot and a few dings. They are all pinpoint sized (see 5th photo from the top) and barely noticeable. The crimped nib is somewhat scratchy. It's not awful, you can live with it, but it is scratchy. Nothing some 6000 grade Micromesh can't fix. Don't overdo it, though. Titanium, though hard, is much softer than Iridium. The feed is very wet. Too wet for anything other than Tomoe River, Clairefontaine, or similar. Too wet for the Fine this nib is supposed to be. It would have been just right if the nib was flexy. However, even though the nib seems to have some bounce, in practice it can't be called anything other than stiff. Verdict: This pen is worthy of a much better nib than the one that came with it. I have a vintage flex #8 nib from a parted-out Good Service that might fit. A #6 Jowo or Bock also might do the trick.
  4. Logen from Seremban

    Apa khabar semua

    Hello everyone, Greetings from Malaysia. I had been browsing as a guest on this site for months but only decided to sign-up a few days back (because a voice in my head told me to do so). I was introduced to fountain pens in school by my teachers when I was 11 and always had a fondness for them since then. My first fountain pen was a Hero, which was awful. Soon after, I got my self a Pilot Birdie which was a delight to use. I used it until I was 26 when I lost it in the office. Only in the past year that I seriously started collecting fountain pens as well as various shades of ink. This is my latest acquisition - A Ranga Model 8b eyedropper in matt black with a Kanwrite flex nib. I paid for it on Thursday and it was delivered on Monday to my amazement (Kudos to Ranga Pen Co and DHL). It is a thing of beauty but had a huge problem. The tines had a gap the size of Grand Canyon. So there was no ink flow at all. One of the advice on the internet is to soak the nib in hot water to bring the tines together. Unfortunately, that did not work. I resorted to using brute force and squeezing the nib to get the tines closer. That seem to have done the trick. I have filled it up with Pelikan Edelstein Moonstone and so far so good. Anyways, it is nice to be a part of this community. Regards, -Logen
  5. This advert is COMPLETED!

    • For Sale
    • Used

    With a lot of regret I offer this amazing pen for sale. I had Shawn Newton make me this beautiful pen with ebonite I selected, and an exquisite super-flex #2 Waterman nib I had out of an old broken BCHR Waterman 52 I had. The nib is spectacular, Fto BBB effortlessly, with beautiful return. It is not a 'wet noodle' per se, as it can write a plain fine line perfectly well, with a light hand. This is an EYEDROPPER pen. It does not post. The reason I am selling it is that it is just too wide for my very small hand. It is similar to a Pelikan M800 or Montblanc 146 in width. In addition, I find I do not care for the eyedropper fill style. Hence I have used it very little; there is essentially no wear on this pen. All I have is a phone camera so the photos are not very good, and I apologize for that.

    $450

    Conway, Massachusetts - US

  6. Fox Point

    Wartime celluloid Pilot info

    Would any Pilot people have any model/date/celluloid info on this neat purple+transparent celluloid japanese eyedropper Pilot pen? I’m putting it at 1939 or 1940 due to it being “Pilot”, having the ridged clip, and having a steel nib and chrome fixtures. The nib says “Pilot, made in Japan, Shinever, 3”. Any insight? I previously posted about this pen in the repair forum seeking shrinkage help as the cap was loose but the barrel-section threaded mating was correct, but that seems to have mysteriously fixed itself, and the cork packing and nib needed no help at all.
  7. I want to convert my Platinum Preppy to an eyedropper pen. Its threads are too coarse to be sealed by silicone grease alone so an O-ring must be added to make an airtight seal. The problem is I have been unable to find O-rings for a reasonable price. I tried to find them over the internet but either 1) they cost far too much 2) are out of stock 3) are not of the appropriate size. None of my local hardware stores seem to have them, also tried the plumbing store and the motorcycle repair shop. Did anybody have better luck finding O-rings ?
  8. Most commericals pens do not arrive ready to be used as eyedroppers. Conversion is a possibility but sealing and ink flow problems often plague the converted pens. A lot of cartrifge pens also do not have feeds capable of buffering large amount of ink in the reservoir. Can any users recommend me beginner pens (below 50 USD) that have the ability to accomodate a converter, cartridge or ink straight from the tank? I already have ebonite eyedropper pens and also one made by Pilot. It would be good to know of a few more commercial eyedroppers.
  9. Sharing the pictures of my new Deccan Author Red Ebonite eyedropper pen. There are 2 previous posts discussing about the acrylic versions of this pen: https://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/topic/216836-deccan-aurelius-author/https://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/topic/224094-the-deccan-aurelius-aka-the-author/I bought the eyedropper, ebonite Author in red colour, with Deccan stock fine nib. Overall design: It is a simple and elegant design. The colour appears more brownish-red than bright red that is seen in images with light. The clip appears slightly off the center (but it doesn't matter to me). There were small fragments of chipped off ebonite material in the barrel. The cap opens in exactly 2 turns. With cap posted: Barrel is quite thick and the pen looks very sturdy: Nib: The junction of nib/feeder and section is beautiful. Deccan logo (stylized D with stars): It is quite comfortable to hold in hands while writing. I will use the pen for a couple of weeks and follow-up with how the nib writes. My favorite writing style of nib is a fine nib that puts down a wet line. I will do whatever tuning it takes to suit this pen to my regular writing need. Please share your pictures of this pen if you have.
  10. Hi, this is my finest stub and my oldest pen. A pre-1907 Mabie Todd & Bard Swan 3003 eyedropper with "short nib, fine" as it was called those times. And when they said fine, a very fine nib was meant: This one gives 0.28 to 0.30mm lines vertically and 0.21mm horizontally on paper. Best wishes Jens
  11. Straight outta Shanghai, crossing vast oceans and lands, comes the latest from PENBBS, the model 487 magnetic filler eyedropper. By now, you've all read about the revival in magnetism in fountain pen filling with the likes of Piedmonte Pen Design and the PENBBS Year of the Rat 492 Well this here's the one for the masses. Same set up as the 492 but a bit more accessible to purchase and just as competent on the magnetic cap pulls magnetic piston. Goodies My first fill brings out the delightful novelty, look ma, no rods! Neato, speedo! The mechanism is very easy with the clear instruction card provided. Initially the push/pull of the piston was stiff and ChrisRap52, Douglas Rathbun, What I Ink, Inky.Rocks YouTube reviews are good for unstuckth tips by turning the piston. This thing holds a lotta ink sans rod and the magnet is plenty strong, heck you can even turn it into a deskpen Fit and finish are superb. This is my first PenBBS pen and I am very pleased beyond the mechanism, if replaced or broken, this would serve as a superlative eyedropper regardless and that is a very good thing.It posts securely but makes the pen over long and I don't post even though I'm a serial poster. Purdy - Chatoyance, pearly pearls all the way from cap to barrel. Described as brume, mist or fog in French and I had to look that up; there went the college French.Balance - this pen has "it" unposted which very few pens do for me. I love the taper and grip section, very well balanced like another fav balance, the FPR Himalaya v2 or Sheaffer ... Balance!Smoother writer - the RM, round medium has no skips and no leaks. The flow gushes with Monteverde Blue Black. Very surprised for my first PenBBS pen. Waay waay better than the (bleep) Moonman M8 dry junky nibs coming out recently Neutral This pen is long, like Cross Peerless, Pilot 743 length. But not an issue for me unposted Baddies Hard to say for only a week in of usage. There is so much good!! Well this pen does have magnets so I steer away from mechanical watches and maybe some electronics unless data scrambles from poor to nil gauss shielding. It does not stick to the titanium Conid though. Design flaw alert: Unlike the 492, the back end cap does not appear to unscrew meaning the end is not user accessible to poke a chopstick on the magnetic piston if it gets stuck. And oh boy, it done stick, stuck, stooky. I'm still on my first fill despite using it onstop daily journalling, scribbling, todoing. For fun, I tried moving the piston to dispel the empty void but no go. Argh!!! I had to syringe out the ink as my theory was the magnet is not strong enough to dispense against the feed. It did start moving again thankfully once the barrel is emptied with ink, but it shows a fatal design flaw where if the magnetic piston does get stuck at the end cap on full fill there is no way to release the piston short of a more powerful electromagnet. What I surmise is that the piston attaches to only one side and may displace at an angle if a weak push/pull attempt is made. If the piston gasket is askew from perpendicular from the inner barrel, stuck city. When I made another attempt on a full pen, the piston finally moved and jerkily burped ink successfully out the feed and onto my hand. This is definitely in need of some user practice or I'll settle for long serial fills at a time.That said, if the piston is irrevocably stuck, one still has a very competent eyedropper pen Summary Despite the non-end cap user accessibility, PenBBS 487 is a wonderful pen on its own write/right. Pretty, functional and balanced aside from its nifty novelty of filling mech.
  12. Hi, I've been looking for a second Swan eye dropper and so this one made it's way from England. It is a 3202 MED with stub nib made ca. 1915 to 1920 with an original leather pouch. I think it was good luck to find such a nice pen... Some photos, the Swan as it came, not much to do for restauration, needs some reallignment of the tines. Best wishes Jens
  13. Sharing some photographs of a 1902 Mabie Todd & Bard silver eyedropper with the ink flow control valve. Engraving on the barrel: The Swan Pen PAT. FEB 8 81. FEB 21.82. MAR 6.88 Mabie Todd & Bard New York Sterling Albert S Waller February 1902 In recognition of Faithful Service Mabie Todd & Bard As per the book, of Steve Hull, the ink control valve is illustrated below. I'm not sure that it is more of a marketing claim than a precision ink flow control! Anyone had good experience of using this ink control stopper? NB. The BCHR slip cap is not original, i'm sure looking at advertising of the time it would have been silver overlay. Regards. Kevin
  14. Hello everyone here at FPN, this is my first publication this year and I take this opportunity to show you my most recent acquisition. I made this purchase on eBay at a good price and it is a very interesting vintage flexible fountain pen: Measures length: 5 inchesBrand: UnknownPen material: EboniteClip material: SteelOverlay material: I don't knowFilling system: EyedropperInk capacity: 3mlNib: 14K Warranted # 8 flexFlow: Wet It is a fairly light and comfortable pen to use and is quite fun to use and enjoy its flexible nib and its fed is quite generous, but it requires me somewhat decent paper since the feed is wet. Next I will show you the photos of the fountain pen and some writing samples using flex and another without flex.
  15. I found this on eBay and I figured this is just what My Opus 88 Demonstrator needed. It's branded FANMU, though none of the few sellers on eBay who offer it market it as such. I always found eyedroppers to be inadequate for the purpose of filling their namesake pens; not enough capacity, a hassle to clean... boring... The Fanmu addresses all these shortcomings, IMHO. It basically works like the filling mechanism in the TWSBI Go and it works really well. It's fun to use and it's quite well made. Looks good too. It's one of those things that you didn't know you needed, but once you have one you wonder how you managed without.
  16. penzel_washinkton

    Opus 88 Flow

    Not sure if anyone seen it, Opus 88 is releasing a new pen after their Bella line up. The new release is called the "Flow": https://www.instagram.com/p/B7EGabljZen/ https://www.facebook.com/OPUS-88-%E8%A3%BD%E7%AD%86-%E7%B2%BE%E5%9F%BA-117055545603286/ It is the first of their pens to be fitted with a Bock nib unit housing I believe. In the past I had concerns on buying an Opus 88 pens due to their relatively high price point but was softening up for the Opus 88 Omar Demonstrator version. Then this came out. Better have an internal discussion with my head, wallet and heart again.
  17. Good morning! Technical - and perhaps stupid - question: how do I seal an eyedropper to prevent ink leakage from the point where the section screws into the barrel without using silicone grease? I've started using paraffin wax: once warmed with the fingers, it can be spread very homogeneously and seems to work well. However: - Am I doing potential damage? I.e., is paraffin wax able to corrode or damage ebonite, or is it safe? - Would it be better to use natural wax? I read somewhere that it contains potentially harmful acid substances?
  18. I have a Pilot EF that I think needs a bit of smoothing, but I am scared to death of ruining it. I bought a micro-mesh pad and decided to have a go at a Platinum Preppy that is in a color I don't use. Then I decided since I was already messing around with the pen that I might as well try to eyedropper it, something I have never done before. I used silicone grease and all seemed to be well except later on I noticed some ink spots on my hands, so I think it is leaking somewhere. I do hold my pens fairly close to the nibs. I can't find an o-ring in an appropriate size so I have temporarily added some plumber's tape but that is unsightly and makes it harder to cap the pen. Below is a photo, minus the plumber's tape. I think the smoothing went well but was not excessive, but I still need to come up with a better seal for the eyedropper; I'm trying to work up the courage to smooth out the Pilot EF a bit. The ink is Diamine Oxblood, which I'm testing out and seems quite nice. Do people add a ball to their eyedroppered pens to help keep the ink from drying up?
  19. During a recent trip to Berlin, I happened to stay near the excellent Papeterie Moranga (just off Winterfeldtplatz), and came across two beautiful pens from Taiwan that I'd never seen in the wild before. One was the Bronze Age eyedropper/converter (which I purchased) and another was the more recent version, Gold Armour, which another FPner writes a wonderful review of here. If you are in the US, I believe there are one or two online stores that carry these pens, but they are (so far) relatively difficult to track down. These pens are so great, though, that I imagine they will become much more visible in the next few years. To my eye, they are as interesting, if not more, than the Opus eyedroppers. Highly recommended! The pens are a striking combination of brass and transparent acrylic (at least I am assuming it's acrylic), which can double as both an eyedropper and converter. I was torn between them, but ultimately went with the faceted edges of the Bronze Age. (The Gold Armour version features a round cap that has small points to prevent it from rolling, and can also come with a beautiful bronze colored nib.) I have no connection to Moranga or Fine Writing International--just a happy pen-owner! And if you are in Berlin, Moranga also has a lot of other wonderful stationary items--including new Midori notepads that I haven't yet found for sale in the US. The owner is also super friendly, and let me try out a ton of pens, including the newish line of Sailor Naginata Togi nibs.
  20. GMJEbonobin

    Athena Brand Pens

    Hi guys! I found a seller on ebay that is selling some new old stock Athena brand pens. I was wondering if anyone could give me some information on them? Specifically I want to know if and/or when they started using eyedroppers with ink shut off (as that's kind I purchased)
  21. Hello FPNers, I just received my pens from Fosfor Pens. Wanted to share my first impressions with all of you! This review will not have any ratings. All I can tell you is, I simply love these pieces of art and highly recommend Fosfor Pens... Pen #1: - Parker Duofold style flat top pen with roller clip - Material : Vintage Mazzucchelli Cebloplast - Length : 138 mm capped, 128 mm uncapped, about 170 mm posted - Width : 13.6 mm at the barrel-cap threads - Nib : Jowo steel, Extra Fine The pen is beautiful, just magnificent. You can keep staring at the material, the depth is so amazing. Pictures taken by Manoj- Well, this pen, in a matter of seconds, became one of my favorites. Manoj has cut very smooth triple start threads and the cap takes just 2 turns to disengage from the barrel. It's polished so well. I asked him for a Jowo Steel EF nib and it had feedback, not scratchy, but just feedback. I smoothed it out and it is a joy to write with. It's wet and smooth, but puts down a precise line on the paper. It's a cartridge/converter filling system, but can be used as an eyedropper too. I am not used to writing with Extra Fine and Fine nibs, so I find it a bit difficult to get used to. Pen #2: - Parker Duofold style flat top pen with roller clip - Material : SEM Black Ebonite with Himalayan Cedar inlays on the cap and barrel ends. - Length : 138 mm capped, 128 mm uncapped, about 170 mm posted - Width : 13.6 mm at the barrel-cap threads - Nib : Jowo steel, 1.1 Stub (my all-time favorite) Many may brush aside this beauty thinking this is just another boring black pen...but hold on! There is something interesting, the cap finial and the barrel end have Himalayan Cedar inlaid to them. And the wood looks beautiful, it's a very good contrast. I contemplated about the inlay work, looked at some plastics with interesting patterns, but nothing enticed me more than the organic feel of the wood. But picking the type of wood to use was a challenge, because we have a very small surface area to show the grain. Manoj suggested that we use Himalayan Cedar which has good grain, some yellows, browns, pinks and reds. I am glad to have followed his suggestion. The pen is very beautiful. This has the same triple start threads like the other one has, but the threads don't feel as smooth, may be because it's ebonite. I just put some silicone grease and it helped a bit. Filling system is the same as on the other pen. Pictures taken by Manoj- This pen has my favorite Jowo steel 1.1 Stub nib. Its a great nib, smoothing it a little bit only helped. Usually the 1.1s have a scratchy diagonal upstroke (at least my experience with many of them). So I used some micromesh and it now writes like a dream. Writing Sample: My thanks to Manoj...he is an awesome penmaker, and his patience is remarkable. A lot of care has been taken while polishing, attention to detail is excellent. All my requests to him till now take numerous phone calls and emails, but he has been very patient and is always open to suggestions and challenges. If I could change something, it would be to increase the length of the cap and barrel by a couple of mm, in all make it about 145 mm. Hanging around together- Will post a review of another pen soon. Thanks for reading! Regards, Raghuram.
  22. NobleDel

    Esterbrook Eyedropper Question

    Hello, Can anyone provide information about this pen? I recently won an auction for this Esterbrook BCHR eyedropper pen. Per Paul Hoban's book, Esterbrook sold two eyedropper models around 1915 and 1920. One marked Relief 314, and one marked Made in U.S.A. The pen I won is marked Made in U.S.A. The nib is marked 14 ct. which may indicate it was made for the European market. This could explain the fact that the seller of this pen was in the UK. Any more info about this pen such as dates of production, manufacturer if not actually Esterbrook, etc., would be appreciated. Thank you very much.
  23. I have seen this pen by various Indian sellers. It is a cheapie, marketed at school children from the graphic. It looks more like a Monster Truck, just the sort of thing that might be more attractive than a flat colour. It looks very much like a Click Warvick. Well, it is by the same factory. The pen seems to be badged as a Fellowship brand pen. But does it have a name? I have a handful of other pens of this company that look very similar. If they are rough & scratchy I can fix that with the micro-mesh.
  24. Opus88 Omar Clear Demonstrator is one of the latest eyedropper pens from Taiwan based, Opus88 Many reviews have touched on the basics of these popular eyedropper filling mechanism based designs. They drink most any ink and have cornered the market on affordable modern eyedropper mechanism pens with piston shut-off. This is just a quick look at the largest size Omar in a clear demonstrator finish. The Omar is basically the demonstrator model plus a few stylish curved touches.The piston rod pulls out just like other opi/opuses to act as a shut-off from the main ink supply.I've never had one of these pens before and bought it for the looks, filling mechanism and Jowo #6 nib compatibility.Plus it is waay less expensive than a Namiki Emperor or vintage Ban-ei eyedropper with that cool eyedropper mechanism. Size is relative. But the Omar is a non-posting pen and skews to the larger side.I have smaller hands but I found the size very comfortable, more than say a Pilot Custom Urushi I'd put it between a Sailor KOP and Sailor 1911L; just right!! Top to Bottom size comparison: Pilot Custom Urushi, Opus88 Omar Clear, Lamy Safari Vista, Sailor 1911 Large Demonstrator, Aurora 88 Chrome cap, Pilot Kakuno So far the performance is the great standard out of the box, Jowo #6 medium nib: smooth and direct with little feedback using Monteverde Olivine ink I have not tried swapping the steel nib but I do believe that it would be compatible with Jowo #6 nibs on cartridge/converter pens like Franklin-Christoph, Edison Pens, Esterbrook Estie (Kenro), Carolina Pen Company, Ryan Krusac pens, et al.from other videos I think there is a teeny o-ring I need to retain unlike the c/c jowo which does not have one.One negative was the nib was askew from the feed out of the box, but a simple twist set the feed aligned symmetrically with the nib point.Built quality It's plastic and sturdy and clearIt has that plastic on plastic squeak/scratch sound between the threads (I'll probably silicone em up)the powder coated paint black matte clip seems pretty secure I wish more companies were like TWSBI and include extra goodies, as Opus88 could supply back-up o-ringsSummary I'd buy this pen again. It can serve a one pen person admirably. Feels sturdy though light. I like its styling good looks as I did not care for the colored versions of the Omar line.It's Jowo #6 interchangeable swapparoni niboroniIt can contain a good amount of ink as a testbed/sandbox for scary iron galls to shiny shimmery, pigmented (bleep) you cannot use on vintageIt has that cool eyedropper mechanism yet inexpensive enough that you don't break the bank having to finda Ban-ei living national treasure pen restorer in case it breaks.My biggest negative is that it does not POST
  25. Taiwan pen maker (and stationary products importer) Fine Writing International (尚羽堂) has released the 6th generation of their brass pen. The cap is a big part of the story of this pen. This is the first round cap in the series. The others were octagonal. It's also more ornate that previous iterations. It's crazy-cool. The design is inspired by patterns found in Chinese armour. It looks like the Mountain pattern armour (山文铠) which first appeared in the Tang Dynasty. Then there's the lion with the dagger in its mouth on the end of the cap. The concept is that given that the pen is mightier than the sword, it should be helpful to armour-up your pen (and give it a knife-baring mascot). The pen uses a #6 Jowo steel nib and comes with a converter. Eyedroppering is a natural, however. There's a o-ring on the section. I added silicon grease to the section threads. The cap itself is about 25g making the capped pen over 50g. Sans cap it is a much more reasonable weight - with a full barrel of ink. Capped 140mmUncapped 130.5mmSection diameter: 10.3 -11.9mmBarrel diameter: 13mmThe design balances the pen's proportions very well. The size and diameter of the section is comfortable. The length natural. The diameter of the barrel feels right. I got mine with a 1.1 stub. It's also available with EF, F, M, and B nibs. I picked KWZ Brown-Pink. The pen holds 4ml according to the included booklet. Writing with the Golden Armour is a treat. The nib couldn't be smoother and gives gentle but clear line variation. It's wet without being a gusher. The pen wrote perfectly from the first. The weight of the pen calms my writing - as much as that's possible. I find watching the letters form inspiring. Fine Writing International is far from a household name - though they are getting more attention lately. You may have seen their Planets series. I feel fortunate to have had my head up when this pen came along. The pen was just over US$90 direct from Fine Writing International. I understand retailers in the UK and Japan stock this pen. Not sure about the US. But FWI ships internationally as does Taipei retailer TY Lee. More pictures and comments here.





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